What I Learned From Ancient Whitetail Does

It was 1993, and Bill Clinton was sworn in as President. Jurassic Park was released. The premier issue of Quality Whitetails magazine was sent to QDMA members, and a whitetail doe was born in rural Washington County, New York. Though three of these four events likely evoke a memory or have some meaning for you, the last one stands out and …

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VIDEO: Jawbone Aging Part 2 – Tooth Wear

One of the most important skills for any deer manager involved in a Quality Deer Management (QDM) program is the ability to age deer after harvest.

Without knowing the deer’s age it is unfair to compare deer by body weight and antler size. It is also important to know the age structure of your deer herd to know where your program is and where it is going to set realistic goals and expectations.

The most commonly used technique to age deer after harvest is the tooth replacement and wear technique. As the name implies, this technique involves two processes – tooth replacement, simply the replacement of teeth over time as with humans, and tooth wear, the erosion of teeth over time.

In part one of our jawbone aging series, QDMA CEO and wildlife biologist Brian Murphy examines tooth replacement to classify deer ages into three groups – fawns, yearling (1.5 year old deer) and adult deer (2.5 or older).

Here in part two of the series, Brian demonstrates how the tooth wear technique can be used to age deer into the older age classes.

The final installment in the three-part series allows viewers to apply what they’ve learned with a jawbone aging quiz.

VIDEO: Jawbone Aging Part 1 – Tooth Replacement

One of the most important skills for any deer manager involved in a Quality Deer Management (QDM) program is the ability to age deer after harvest.

Without knowing the deer’s age it is unfair to compare deer by body weight and antler size. It is also important to know the age structure of your deer herd to know where your program is and where it is going to set realistic goals and expectations.

The most commonly used technique to age deer after harvest is the tooth replacement and wear technique. As the name implies, this technique involves two processes – tooth replacement, simply the replacement of teeth over time as with humans, and tooth wear, the erosion of teeth over time.

In part one of our jawbone aging series, QDMA CEO and wildlife biologist Brian Murphy examines tooth replacement to classify deer ages into three groups – fawns, yearling (1.5 year old deer) and adult deer (2.5 or older).

In part two of the series, Brian demonstrates how the tooth wear technique can be used to age deer into the older age classes.

The final installment in the three-part series allows viewers to apply what they’ve learned with a jawbone aging quiz.

A Leg Up: Judging Buck Age From Body Proportions

Is there a wall or door somewhere in your childhood home bearing pencil marks that track your height through the years? If we could just as easily track the body proportions of whitetail bucks as they grow, it would be a great help in estimating their age each time we see them again. I received …

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How Many Bucks Can I Harvest?

Let’s continue our discussion of harvest prescriptions with another common question: “How many bucks can I harvest?” The number of bucks you can harvest will depend highly on your level of restraint and the age classes you desire to shoot. If you choose to shoot a lot of yearling bucks (1½ years old), each year …

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