Whitetails are the most studied – and hunted – wildlife species in North America. QDMA helps fund scientific research that can help you be a more effective hunter and deer manager, and we’ll share the latest knowledge with our members.

Will Dominant Bucks Dominate the Breeding?

“Do a handful of bucks sire the majority of the fawns?” This question is often followed with a series of questions, such as: “If the dominant buck in my area has narrow antlers, will I start seeing more narrow-antlered bucks?” Or… “If someone shoots the dominant buck early in the season will it upset the …

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The Antler Growth Bell Curve

There’s a simple rule underlying antler development in whitetail bucks that all hunters should understand. Awareness of this rule provides a bridge over many of the false expectations, myths, mistakes and frustrations that lie waiting along your path to QDM success. The rule is this: If you could know all the gross antler scores for …

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The Vomeronasal Organ

How Bucks Use the Vomeronasal Organ During the RutAre you primed for the rut? A whitetail buck has a special organ in the roof of its mouth that helps it get primed. In this video, our founder, Joe Hamilton, explains how the vomeronasal organ works. Posted by The Quality Deer Management Association on Monday, October …

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Tarsal Glands: What We Know

The tarsal gland, arguably the most important gland in deer communication, is found on bucks and does. Each hair is associated with an enlarged sebaceous or “fat” gland that secretes an oily material that coats the hair. Research has shown this gland is active year-round in both bucks and does. When a deer “rub-urinates”, allowing …

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The Hunter’s Guide to Deer Vision

It’s happened to every bowhunter—a deer spots you for no apparent reason while perfectly concealed.  Was it your scent, your noise, your movement, or perhaps what you were wearing? While all hunters agree that deer have an amazing ability to detect movement, the consensus regarding what colors deer can see is far less unanimous.  Because …

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