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Old 01-12-2007, 09:36 AM
smsmith smsmith is offline
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Default Cages for protecting trees

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Old 01-12-2007, 04:24 PM
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So if I read that right you do 1 tube made from 2" wire fabric and another made from 4 or 5" wire fabric spaced away from the tree? How does the smaller one keep rodents away? Can't the rodents and such get through? Reason I'm asking is I am planning to do some serious tree planting in 2 yrs and want to do it right the first time. Thanks.
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Old 01-12-2007, 10:53 PM
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So how do you get it to stand up with the tree? Is it tied directly to the tree or do you use 2 sets of stakes?
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Old 01-13-2007, 09:58 PM
sandbur sandbur is offline
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I find the 15 to 17 foot lengths provide some support for the limbs as the trees get older. Somewhat helps keep limbs from breaking if you get a heavy apple crop. About 10 years back, with the deep snow, I did get some browsing over the four foot cages. More than just nibbling around the edges.

Apples do fall in the bigger cages, and I remove them to reduce disease in the next crop. This applies more so to the apples in my yard, not those for the deer that get less attention.

I use mulch around the tree. Also put leftover tree tubes of various lengths around the trunk to keep away rodents. Either tie this to the trunk of bigger trees or if there is a gap between the tube and the tree, I place a chunk of Tomcat rodenticide in the tube. Works most of the time. And the tube keeps the tree from splitting from the winter sun.

Charlie Morse suggested 5 foot fencing cut into 10 foot lengths. I will try this on some of the smaller trees that I ordererd from him. He also advised me to split the tubes over young trees and put a block in the split for the fall/winter to harden off the new growth. I had tried this in the past and suffered winter damage, but did not leave the block in all winter, only for the fall. He says the warming/cooling cycle during winter can kill the new growth in the tubes. Maybe I should give the tubes another try. I struggled with them on many kinds of trees in the past.
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Old 01-14-2007, 07:58 AM
maya maya is offline
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Here's one. If you look close there are also some limb spreaders being used if anyone is interested.
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Old 01-14-2007, 03:52 PM
edisonck edisonck is offline
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Maya- Where did you get those limb spreaders? I have been searching the internet however, if you are happy this those I can end my search!

I have also read that you can make your own with wood and finishing nails. I am curious as to whether or not these work as well as the commercially made ones.
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Old 01-14-2007, 06:43 PM
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Maya-How do you cage your trees? It looks like they are 6 feet tall and have a bigger mesh. Do you fence several trees at once? Is the larger mesh a lot cheaper?
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Old 01-14-2007, 07:03 PM
paleopoint paleopoint is offline
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Another suggestion: Use 'woven-wire' farm fence.....the common fence used in rural America to enclose pastures & fields. With the tear-out of many fence rows you may be able to acquire a role of this old fence (about 49" high, I think) very cheaply.

It is what I use to protect my trees. I also have rolls and rolls of aluminum gutter screen (bought at an estate sale) that is used to wrap the trunk itself. The farm fence keeps the deer away from the trunk and many branches; and the screen keeps the mice & rabbits away from the trunk.

These were the materials at hand so I've used them to good effect.
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Old 01-14-2007, 07:40 PM
maya maya is offline
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Edisonck, I've gotten them from a couple different nurseries. Stark Brothers comes to mind. They are real cheap, don't bother making them.

Sandbur I've done it as you see(that's Bill Mayos friend coyote up at Bill's camp. Bill wrote a few articles for Quality Whitetails.) He also fenced of large areas bloking of 10 or 20 tree's. It's expensive, no doubt! I've taken some fencing that is only 3 feet ( a little cheaper) and raised it up a couple feet and nailed it to ceder posts. I don't know of any real cheap effective way to do it, but if you have any sort of herd that hangs around those trees in winter and you don't fence them and screen the base of the tree to guard against mice and rabbits you will loose a lot of money!
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Old 01-14-2007, 07:49 PM
maya maya is offline
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These are some wild ones that weren't fenced but I just thought I'd share this pick I took just last week. Look at the apples on it! I wish I had a pick of it 4 or 5 years ago it was a mess! I still need to do a lot of prunning on it but it does so well every year I don't want to cut to much at once. It's a great winter food source. Although with the weather we've had this year the deer have access to all the food they want!
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Old 01-16-2007, 08:34 AM
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I've used aluminum foil to wrap around the bottom of a 100+ of my trees last year. It's cheap and easy to do.
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Old 01-16-2007, 10:32 AM
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Haven't seen any. I loosely rap about 8" at the bottom.
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Old 01-16-2007, 08:51 PM
grizzly2c grizzly2c is offline
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I didnt understand what you wrapped the base (trunk) of the tree in, was it mesh wire. I do like the tin foil idea also. Anyone sure this wont hurt the trees?
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Old 01-17-2007, 11:01 AM
grizzly2c grizzly2c is offline
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ok thanks alot, the tin foil idea seems really easy and cheap to do. just wanted to make sure it woudnt hurt the trees.
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Old 01-21-2007, 05:13 PM
chasmo54 chasmo54 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddy Fork View Post
I've used aluminum foil to wrap around the bottom of a 100+ of my trees last year. It's cheap and easy to do.

Muddy Fork,
I like the out of the box thinking. Molds and fungi are problems that afflict many if not most apple trees. Your tin foil idea is great but you might be setting your trees up for attack behind the foil were it is dark with no air movement, ideal for the growth of most mold and fungi including collar rot. I would modify your idea just a little bit by using metal household screening (not vinyl) this will give the needed air movement for preventing problems. Maybe you could poke some small holes in the tin foil.
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Old 01-21-2007, 08:07 PM
maya maya is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chasmo54 View Post
Muddy Fork,
I like the out of the box thinking. Molds and fungi are problems that afflict many if not most apple trees. Your tin foil idea is great but you might be setting your trees up for attack behind the foil were it is dark with no air movement, ideal for the growth of most mold and fungi including collar rot. I would modify your idea just a little bit by using metal household screening (not vinyl) this will give the needed air movement for preventing problems. Maybe you could poke some small holes in the tin foil.

Good point Chasmo! Another idea that we use is window screaning. You can get it at any hardware store, it's cheap and it allows for good airflow.
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Old 01-22-2007, 01:13 AM
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someone said somthin about mulching trees.....I have planted a lot of white cedar and am wondering whether it is worth my time to mulch them? have there been a noticable difference in anualy growth by keeping the weeds out?
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Old 01-22-2007, 07:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noexcuses View Post
someone said somthin about mulching trees.....I have planted a lot of white cedar and am wondering whether it is worth my time to mulch them? have there been a noticable difference in anualy growth by keeping the weeds out?

If you are in a dry area, well drained or a maybe just a dry spell it will help hold moisture, very imprtant for your young trees. Also if you have them planted in your yard or an area you might mow/weed wack you don't have to worry about cutting to close to the tree if it is mulched well.

It won't hurt however when apples get bigger and producing you don't want leaf litter and the like under trees for mold spores to develope in. They do make tyvek circles you can put at the base of the tree to keep weeds down. They are a little expesive though.
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Old 01-22-2007, 10:39 AM
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Noexcuses- mulching white cedar may leave them more exposed to the deer if they are not fenced. I also get more winter burn if my cedar and spruce do not have some shade or snow cover when they are young. The weeds may provide the shade, but slow growth a bit. Just two things to consider.
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Old 01-24-2007, 07:46 PM
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Maya,

Wouldn't mind having a few scions off that tree that still has apples on it, for my grafting this spring???

Noexcuses,


I have 200 trees from 3 to 100 years old.

For my young trees, I use spiral rodent guards put on during hunting season $.60 ea. must be removed in april since they invite the dreaded borers. Orchard valley supply has them

My neighbor uses window screen and leaves them on with ag-lok at the top (adjustable) the borers cannot pass through the screen. He says hardware cloth is too coarse, mice stay out, but borers may not.

I may get motivated and go this way..

I've been mulching around 100 of my small trees with wood chips. No rodent problems yet. I plan on pre-emergent herbicide on my new high density orchard.

My fence is 4' welded wire and three strands of barbed wire over that. 8' total.

Used to have an electric fence, and gave up on it.
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