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Old 08-27-2012, 10:21 PM
D Hunter D Hunter is offline
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Default Do deer sweat?

Just got in a conversation with a son about our ancestors running down wild game. Some running book said We did better than other species. I know horses sweat
. Also they crave salt in summer. Good hunting. "D"
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Old 08-27-2012, 10:54 PM
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Everything that I ever read has said that deer do not sweat. When you see a big buck after chasing a doe in heat usually they are panting hard. I believe this is the only way that they can cool down. Kinda like fido.
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Old 08-27-2012, 11:03 PM
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Only when a PSE is in the woods.
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Old 08-28-2012, 06:35 AM
D Hunter D Hunter is offline
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I know that dogs do not sweat. Not sure about ungulates(4 stomach critters). Running book said we sweat and thus can regulate our body temp better. Some people according to the book are salty sweaters and need more salt than other people. Those people crave salt in the diet. Made me think of deer and their craving for salt in the summer months. Any scientific data? "D"
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Old 08-28-2012, 06:48 AM
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UGA research suggests they have very few sweat glands. So they exist, but not at levels that make them useful for cooling or result in the appearance of sweat.
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:11 AM
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All mammals have some sweat glands, but no other animal species has the density of sweat glands humans do.

Best guess is that we developed such a high density of sweat glands so we could be highly active during the hottest part of the day (since modern humans developed in the hot savannahs of Africa). This advantage can still be seen in how tribesman in that region hunt big game. They literally run it down over a long period of time--keeping up with a large animal and keeping the quarry running all day until it overheats (we don't overheat because we can cool ourselves by sweating). Eventually the hunters can literally walk right up to the animal and spear or arrow it.
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:39 AM
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Deer and similar animals cool by a couple methods.

First is by diverting more blood to the skin...using it sort of like the radiator in your car. Hot weather animals such as Brahma cattle and jackrabbits are evidence of this with their large ears. This is limited in real hot weather, but it helps.

Second is panting, where the animal basically evaporates moisture from the mouth by blowing across the tongue. This uses some energy, reduces feed intake (animals can't eat or chew cud while they are panting), and messes up blood chemistry a little bit due to minerals lost via saliva. but it has kept deer alive for many hot summers.
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D Hunter View Post
Also they crave salt in summer.

Yes, mammals need salt, but they need it and use it differently than we humans (and I would like to thank Dr. Woods for this information). We humans sweat when we are hot to cool our bodies through evaporative cooling. Since we lose salt when we sweat, and we sweat far more than any other mammal, our need for salt is to replace lost salt through sweating. Ungulates like deer use salt very differently. Since they only sweat minimally, they use salt in their kidneys to draw excess water from their blood stream to be expelled as urine. This is why, instead of needing salt more when conditions are hot and dry (like we do), deer need more salt when conditions are very wet--when the plants they eat hold excessive amounts of water. They need salt to draw the excess water out of their blood stream.

I had alway noticed--and been confused--by deer hitting salt licks very hard during extended periods of rainy weather in summer, yet they hardly used salt licks at all during a drought. The need for salt to drain excess water from their bodies during wet periods explains this observation.
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Old 08-29-2012, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BSK_ View Post
Yes, mammals need salt, but they need it and use it differently than we humans (and I would like to thank Dr. Woods for this information). We humans sweat when we are hot to cool our bodies through evaporative cooling. Since we lose salt when we sweat, and we sweat far more than any other mammal, our need for salt is to replace lost salt through sweating. Ungulates like deer use salt very differently. Since they only sweat minimally, they use salt in their kidneys to draw excess water from their blood stream to be expelled as urine. This is why, instead of needing salt more when conditions are hot and dry (like we do), deer need more salt when conditions are very wet--when the plants they eat hold excessive amounts of water. They need salt to draw the excess water out of their blood stream.

I had alway noticed--and been confused--by deer hitting salt licks very hard during extended periods of rainy weather in summer, yet they hardly used salt licks at all during a drought. The need for salt to drain excess water from their bodies during wet periods explains this observation.




Mineral Licks, Geophagy, and Biogeochemistry of North American Ungulates

Jones, Robert Lewis & Harold C. Hanson

Link

Interesting. I don't remember that reason. It may be related to the potassium ion regulation the above book mentioned as a reason for using mineral licks. Spring plants have a potassium ion load deer etc have to deal with, the way I remember it, but it has been many years since I read the book.


More on Geophagy
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