Go Back   QDMA Forums > Habitat Management > Food Plots for Whitetails

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-26-2012, 11:48 PM
Robertesq1's Avatar
Robertesq1 Robertesq1 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 87
Default 19-19-19 vs 12-12-12

19-19-19 sells close to 12-12-12 but is 75% more fertilizer. What is wrong with spreading it a little thinner and getting more bang for the buck? Am I missing something?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-27-2012, 12:04 AM
CaveCreek CaveCreek is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hill Country, TX
Posts: 4,834
Default

Isn't that 58% more? : )

Typically those fertilizers don't sell for the same price. But yes, if they are the same price, with nothing else different between them (for instance, micro-nutrients) then there would be little reason not to go with the Triple-19.
__________________
Look to the Heavens, As there lies the true answers in life. No mountain too tall, no ocean too wide.
And I, obsessed with the land, but dedicated to the One who created it.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-27-2012, 12:10 AM
Robertesq1's Avatar
Robertesq1 Robertesq1 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 87
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaveCreek View Post
Isn't that 58% more? : )

Typically those fertilizers don't sell for the same price. But yes, if they are the same price, with nothing else different between them (for instance, micro-nutrients) then there would be little reason not to go with the Triple-19.

Math was never my strong suit , not the same price but not 58% more, didn't understand why anyone, especially a food plotter would buy/lug the weaker formula.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-27-2012, 12:46 AM
yoderj@cox.net yoderj@cox.net is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,932
Default

It is the same principle as buying a gym membership to workout. You get to carry 58% more fertilizer from the store to your pickup and from your pickup to your spreader with the 12-12-12. You have to expect to pay a little more for that extra work-out!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-27-2012, 01:01 AM
Jim Timber's Avatar
Jim Timber Jim Timber is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Twin Cities/Brainerd, Minnesota
Posts: 1,960
Default

Potentially burning plants is the down side. If you put it on too heavy, you can cause problems. 19-19-19 probably isn't so bad, but when you get into the 30's it's like playing with fire - there's a fine line between a big serving and O.D..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-27-2012, 06:28 AM
broom_jm broom_jm is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Mooresville, IN
Posts: 1,647
Default

Well, I can see some situations where I "might" buy triple-12 over triple-19, but they would be few and far between.

Say you have a 1/10th acre plot and the soil survey says to add 120# each of P&K. With triple-12, you can apply 2 bags and get exactly what was prescribed, plus most of the nitrogen you are likely to need, depending on what you're planting.

Basically it comes down to possibly simplifying your math and not having to apply portions of a bag of 19-19-19 on small plots. For larger areas, where higher total volumes of nutrients are needed, go with whatever is most cost-effective. Personally, I tend to avoid the triple-x fertilizers, unless they just happen to work out well for the P&K needs. More often than not, I find myself using something like 6-24-24 and some urea to meet the target numbers.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-27-2012, 08:22 AM
banc123's Avatar
banc123 banc123 is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member. Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Hunt S.E. GA
Posts: 16,205
Default

Cost of 19 = A
Cost of 12 = B

If A x 12/19 < B buy A

Cost of 19 X 63.2% vs cost of 12 is the economic compare. Just like buying lime you have to compare apples to apples.

12s has 37% less NPK than 19s ; so you need (1-.37=.63 ) of 19s to = 12s

If you need 300 lbs of 12s then the math for 19 is the same.

300 X 63.2% x .19= 36 NPK = 300 x .12 = 36 NPK So 189lbs of 19s (300x.63= 189lbs ) to = 300lbs of 12s.

Math is more important when buying bulk.

If you're buying by the bag then it's 6 bags of 12s vs 4 bags of 19s. It may cost you more for 19s since you're paying for 11lbs you don't need.

If you need 200 lbs of 19s and can only fine 12s it's the inverse

200 / .632= 316lbs x .12= 38lbs NPK = 200 x .19 = 38lbs NPK. 316lbs vs 200lbs

19 / 12 = 1.58 , which means you need 58% More of 12s to = 19s

200 x1.58 also = 316 lbs of 12s to = 200lbs of 19s.



Fun fun......
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-27-2012, 08:33 AM
Gator's Avatar
Gator Gator is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Virginia - USDA 7a
Posts: 3,357
Default

This raises a question for me as I'm starting my first plot (I've helped others quite a bit but...). My local southern states will custom mix whatever fertilizer that I want. Is that not the case in some places or is this custom mix going to cost me and arm and leg compared to just buying bags?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-27-2012, 09:50 AM
VHORN4 VHORN4 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 688
Default

Gator,

I have done this for many years and bought fertilizer every year multiple times. Unless you're doing a small amount, you're almost always better off getting it in bulk. You can get your mixture much more exact and it is almost always less expensive too.

If you have a very small plot, it may be easier and cheaper to do bags. I do a lot of acres, so I get a fertilzer buggy to use (which cost some places). I also buy from Southern States. If you really want to do it right, you need to get soil test done too. That will tell you exactly what is recommended for your soil and your crop.

VHORN4
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-27-2012, 11:39 AM
j-bird j-bird is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Decatur Co, IN
Posts: 2,256
Default

alot of times for me its all a matter of what is available and what my budget is and what my plots are or will be planted in. What typically happens is that my small plots need differnent things. Clover/soybean plots don't need N, yet cereal grains and brassica needs N, and corn thrives with alot of N. I try to avoid buying what my crops don't need and then mix and match as needed. If you can get triple 19 for almost triple 12 price then it seems like a good idea, just remember to adjust your applied amount. Just think most of us didn't think deer hunting had anything to do with math.
__________________
"I'm a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it" - Thomas Jefferson
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.