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Old 06-06-2006, 07:35 AM
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Exclamation Liquid Lime

I have access to a lot of liquid lime, the price is right free, but I have never tried it before. If anyone has how did it work for you?
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Old 06-06-2006, 08:35 AM
Liv4Nov Liv4Nov is offline
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I bought 4 gals of the new pH Gain. I used 2 gal in Ohio but have not taken soil tests to see how fast it works. I talked to a pH Gain rep before I bought it. It has to be sprayed on bare soil and disc in to get max effect. Any vegetation reduces the effectiveness as does not working it in soil. The rep said it does all it pH correction in 72 hours. Also said it has no buffer capacity (like lime slowly dissolves and takes longer to work but lasts long). Liquid lime doesn't continue to work and pH slowly drops, need to apply every year.

To me this product is good on a new plot to get a quick pH adjustment but you also need to apply regular lime also.
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Old 06-06-2006, 09:16 AM
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The liquid lime is intended to "trick" the plant rather than amend the soil. I have been sampling various fields and pulled soil samples prior and during growth. All tests indicated that the ph was not increased. Meaning, the plants are being tricked into thinking they are in an ammended environment.

These have been my tests but certainly will vary from person to person. However, my understanding from a chemist is that it will not ammend the soil and yes, like regular liming, it needs to be applied yearly.

Banc123 has been testing also and I am sure he will share his results on this topic. The liquid lime is very interesting, to say the least, and could play a big role on food plotin' in the future.
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Old 06-06-2006, 01:50 PM
Teeton Teeton is offline
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Any of you guys have the names and places you can get this stuff. I would also like to read more about this stuff. web sites would be good. Thanks Ed
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Last edited by Teeton : 06-06-2006 at 01:52 PM.
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:18 AM
Wooddust Wooddust is offline
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This subject amuses me to a great extent because the simple fact is that what pH is and what soil chemistry is is not something one can quick fix or shortcut...these miracle cures are like Food Plot Holy Water....the people that make and market it get rich and the unsuspecting buyer is the one whos pocket gets picked.

Ph is a measure of realtive acidity of the soil....Lime is the neutralizing agent that can alter the pH. To do this takes time because the Lime has to move into the soil solution then chemically react with the soil. The two forms of lime that you should consider are aglime...mined and crushed limestone, or Pell Lime...pelletized and cooked limestone that reacts faster and is easy to handle....

The physics and the chemistry is simple to understand. Bottom line is if you need 2 tons of lime per acre, no liquid stuff at one gallon per acre can ever hope to do what 2 tons of lime will do.
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Old 06-07-2006, 03:11 PM
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I agree that the liquid can not do what ag lime can but I was unable to get ag lime on before my buddy with the tractor was ready to till for me. I'm just woundering if the liquid would do any good for the short term till I get some ag lime on this fall.
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:15 PM
300 Win Mag 300 Win Mag is offline
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Jared from Helena Chemical right here in NE PA has some. His user name on the forum is Helena Chemical. Im trying some out for the first time.
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Old 06-07-2006, 09:12 PM
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Did this just before the forum went down. PH Gain says 1 gal per 1/2 acre

Plot #1 - ˝ acre starting pH 5.5 put down 2.5 gal of liquid lime and 15 gal of water pH after 1 month and only 2 inch of rain was 6.4

Plot #2 - 3/4 acre starting pH 5.2 put down 4 gal of liquid lime in 20gal of water , 2 gal and then 2 gal two a few weeks later before one of rains since Jan pH was 6.3

Plot #3 - 1/4 acre starting ph 4.9 , put down 1.5 gal of liquid lime the same day as #1. and it went to 5.7

I did two others but never retested them due to rain shortage.

Our soil is fairly sandy and it may work better/faster in sandy soil, not sure. I also put down more than the recommended amount.

I will say I've noticed some areas of the plots I planted after liquid lime are thriving while others are not. I have a feeling thats due to the coverage area not being consistent. I found it hard to get a feeling of equal and adequate coverage. The larger the area, the more uncomfortable I was that I was getting an even coverage.

As far as tricking the plant vs amending the soil, seems like it really wouldn’t' matter what the plant thought. The problem created by low PH is the soil has a high number of H+ ions and that causes the soil particles to lock onto any N-P-K added to the soil so its not available for the plant to absorb because its locked to the soil particle. No matter how much the plant wants it, the soil particles are holding on to the minerals making them insoluble for the plant. Kind of like glue the plant can't break on its own.

I started with 30 gal of PH Gain because I was able to get it at cost. $7 a gal

I understand and see how the chemical reaction with liquid lime works, same principle as any other lime, although it breaks down way faster. Liquid lime is not the answer for me for a long term, I think ag lime has worked the best when I used it, pellet works just well , easier to use but cost way more.
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Old 06-09-2006, 06:39 AM
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Default banc123

Plot #1 - ˝ acre starting pH 5.5 put down 2.5 gal of liquid lime and 15 gal of water pH after 1 month and only 2 inch of rain was 6.4

Thanks for the reply. Did you mix 2.5 gal. to 15 gal. water all in on mix? I have a boom less sprayer on my ATV, not sure how thick to mix it.
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Old 06-09-2006, 06:51 PM
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Yep, all in one mix. The liquid lime is like coke in thickness, so you can easily mix 1 gal of lime to 3-5 gal of water no problem. The other two that I have yet to test I put 6 gal in 20 gal of water and put 1/2 on one plot and 1/2 on the other. So 3 gal per acre. It recommends 1 gal per 1/2 acre for pH over 6 and 2 gal if under 6. So I used 3 since it started in the low 5's.
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