Go Back   QDMA Forums > General QDM > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-25-2012, 06:01 PM
horntagger's Avatar
horntagger horntagger is offline
QDMA Life Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Southeast Missouri
Posts: 1,215
Default High Fence now effects no Fence in Missouri

MDC to hold open house on CWD next steps June 2 in Macon County
Open house will be at New Cambria High School June 2 between 1-4 p.m.

JEFFERSON CITY Mo. Ė The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) will hold an informational open house on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Macon County on June 2 at New Cambria High School, 501 S. Main St. The public is invited to stop by 1-4 p.m.

MDC staff will provide information on five recently found cases of CWD in free-ranging deer in northwest Macon County, explain disease management actions the Department is taking, answer questions and provide information on managing private land for deer.

MDCís disease-management steps to help contain the spread of CWD include two regulation changes to the Wildlife Code of Missouri, recommendations on transportation and disposal of deer carcasses and continuing CWD sampling of deer harvested in the area where CWD has been found.

Restriction on Feeding

The Conservation Commission approved a regulation change at its May 25 meeting that places a restriction on activities that are likely to unnaturally concentrate white-tailed deer and promote the spread of CWD. The ban on the placement of grain, salt products, minerals and other consumable natural or manufactured products is limited to the area where CWD has been found in Macon County and is comprised of Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph and Sullivan counties.

The regulation includes exceptions for backyard feeding of birds and other wildlife within 100 feet of any residence or occupied building, or if feed is placed in such a manner to reasonably exclude access by deer. The regulation also includes exceptions for normal agricultural, forest management, crop and wildlife food production practices.

According to MDC Deer Biologist Jason Sumners, the reason for the regulation change is that activities such as feeding and placement of minerals/salts that artificially concentrate deer greatly increase the likelihood of disease transmission from animal to animal or from soil to animal.

Removal of Antler-Point Restriction

The Conservation Commission also approved a regulation change at its May 25 meeting for a special harvest provision that rescinds the antler-point restriction (four-point rule) in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph and Sullivan counties.

According to Sumners, the reason for the regulation change is that management strategies such as antler-point restrictions, which protect yearling males and promote older bucks, have been found to increase prevalence rates and further spread the disease.

Sumners explained that yearling and adult male deer have been found to exhibit CWD at much higher rates than yearling and adult females so a reduction in the number of male deer can help reduce the spread of CWD. He added that the movement of young male deer from their birth range in search of territory and mates is also a way of expanding the distribution of CWD.

Donít Remove Carcasses from Area

MDC also encourages hunters who harvest deer in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph, and Sullivan counties not to take whole deer carcasses or carcass parts out of the area where CWD has been found. Exceptions to this include meat that is cut and wrapped, meat that has been boned out, quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, hides or capes from which all excess tissue has been removed, antlers, antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue, upper canine teeth and finished taxidermy products.

According to Sumners, the reason for this regulation change is that CWD can be transmitted from the environment to deer through soil and water that contain infected waste and/or infected carcasses. Deer can be infected with CWD but have no visible signs or symptoms. Moving harvested deer that still have parts known to concentrate CWD (brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, and lymph nodes) from the area known to have CWD can introduce the disease to other parts of the state through the improper disposal of carcasses.

He explained that hunters should make every attempt to avoid moving the head and spinal cord from the area and properly dispose of potentially infected deer carcasses, including bones and trimmings, to minimize the risk of exposure to uninfected deer. MDC advises hunters to double-bag carcass parts and take them directly to a landfill, or place them in trash cans for pick-up. Burying carcass waste deep enough to prevent scavengers from digging it up is another acceptable option. As a last resort, and only on their own land, hunters can put carcass waste back on the landscape. Carcasses should be put as close as possible to where the deer was harvested so as to not spread CWD-causing prions to new locations. If possible, put the carcass in a location where it will be inaccessible to scavengers and other deer.

Fall Harvest CWD Sampling

Sumners added that MDC will also continue to work with hunters who harvest deer this fall in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph and Sullivan counties to collect samples for CWD testing. Details on these efforts are being developed and will be shared before the 2012 fall deer hunting season.

Now my opinion

Same old story - Cause and Effect


People that decide to put up a high fence and put some animal behind to hunt or sell.

1. No Double fence so the wild herd can be affected.

2. The water run off no regulated so the wild herd can be affected.

3. Anyone even people with a questionable back ground can run one.

4. Don't have to test for CWD if you don't sell out of state.

Now what is the cause of and effect.

1. The ban on the placement of grain, salt products, minerals and other consumable natural or manufactured products.

Well the multiple landowners that has obey the rules maybe for 5 years maybe for 20 years is now punished because of a few.

One of the first things they will tell you if you hire someone to help manage your property or if your are doing it yourself is to do a camera survey. The new above policy stops all that, best camera surveys in the spring or fall are done over mineral, you are now put back 15 years ago.

Removal of Antler-Point Restriction which I have always been against but is the next best thing to moving the rifle season to December out of the rut.

So you just lost 5 years of growth of quality deer herd. Welcome back to it's brown it's down.

All because of the indifference of one.

Donít Remove Carcasses from Area

Wait till Taxidermist and Processers raise the prices for handling. Don't think it will happen you just watch. If I am wrong post again later I till you I am sorry I was wrong.

All because of one.

Same all story the people that obey the laws, try to improve what they have and save a dollar pay the price.

This effects me in no way at this time, because I don't have land up that way.

But you watch, No.1 will take place state wide, No.2 will never happen now in my county, No. 3 will take place within a year or two.

Of course this is all my opinion, since I don't make policy what does it matter it all
__________________
We live in a world that has woods, and those woods have to be hunted by men with bows. Who's gonna do it? You?

Master Wildlifer
Deer Steward I
Deer Steward II
Deer Steward III
QDMA Life Member

Like North American Wildlife and Habitat on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/pages/North...51224058415401

www.northamericanwildlifeandhabitat.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-25-2012, 06:55 PM
sandbur sandbur is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Minnesota (old USDA 3, new zone 4)
Posts: 11,129
Default

As CWD marches across the whitetail range, I think our definition of QDM or proper deer management will have to change. Many of the practices that we think were good for the herd will no longer be legal.

What areas are free of CWD concerns? It apears to be the southeast.

Texas has CWD on it's doorstep and Iowa is surrounded by positive states.

We should all begin thinking about the disease when doing long term planning for our hunting lands.
__________________
Healthy Habitat, Healthy Deer, Less Antler Obsession-All for the Sake of our Hunting Tradition

NRA Life Member
Muskies, Inc. Life Member
Minnesota Deer Hunters Association
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-25-2012, 08:03 PM
Thayer.qdma's Avatar
Thayer.qdma Thayer.qdma is offline
QDMA Member.
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: St. Louis, MO USDA 6a
Posts: 4,550
Default

Hear Hear Allen...keep up the vigilance.

We can only hope that the MDC can actually keep the severity of the negligence of one deer farm to a minimum.
__________________
Please visit our facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/GatewayQDMA

"Of all the questions which can come before this nation, short of the actual preservation of its existence in a great war, there is none which compares in importance with the great central task of leaving this land even a better land for our descendants than it is for us." TR
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-25-2012, 11:10 PM
B100888 B100888 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Upstate
Posts: 311
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandbur View Post
As CWD marches across the whitetail range, I think our definition of QDM or proper deer management will have to change. Many of the practices that we think were good for the herd will no longer be legal.

What areas are free of CWD concerns? It apears to be the southeast.

Texas has CWD on it's doorstep and Iowa is surrounded by positive states.

We should all begin thinking about the disease when doing long term planning for our hunting lands.

PA is surrounded by cwd, Have more deer farms than alot of states put together and have never had a case of cwd. Things that make ya go hmmm!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-25-2012, 11:33 PM
Munsterlndr's Avatar
Munsterlndr Munsterlndr is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Traverse City, MIchigan
Posts: 1,059
Default

Glad to see that the MDC is acting responsively and taking active steps to combat the spread of this outbreak. Interesting, I saw this quote recently made by Dr. Kroll in regards to the Shell Lake CWD pos. deer in Northern Wisconsin.

"Zechmeister said state deer trustee James Kroll has recommended an aggressive hunt to keep the deer population young as a means of reducing chronic wasting disease in a deer population, without trying to eliminate the population entirely."

If he was quoted accurately, it certainly marks a shift in strategy towards dealing with disease, similar to what the MDC seems to be looking at. It sure makes sense to me that a younger overall herd age structure would provide the best means of limiting the spread of communicable disease.
__________________
Member:
QDMA
MCF
Concerned Sportsmen of Michigan
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-26-2012, 07:26 AM
sandbur sandbur is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Minnesota (old USDA 3, new zone 4)
Posts: 11,129
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by B100888 View Post
PA is surrounded by cwd, Have more deer farms than alot of states put together and have never had a case of cwd. Things that make ya go hmmm!

I hope it never changes for Penn,, but suspect I will be wrong.
__________________
Healthy Habitat, Healthy Deer, Less Antler Obsession-All for the Sake of our Hunting Tradition

NRA Life Member
Muskies, Inc. Life Member
Minnesota Deer Hunters Association
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-26-2012, 07:28 AM
sandbur sandbur is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Minnesota (old USDA 3, new zone 4)
Posts: 11,129
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Munsterlndr View Post
Glad to see that the MDC is acting responsively and taking active steps to combat the spread of this outbreak. Interesting, I saw this quote recently made by Dr. Kroll in regards to the Shell Lake CWD pos. deer in Northern Wisconsin.

"Zechmeister said state deer trustee James Kroll has recommended an aggressive hunt to keep the deer population young as a means of reducing chronic wasting disease in a deer population, without trying to eliminate the population entirely."

If he was quoted accurately, it certainly marks a shift in strategy towards dealing with disease, similar to what the MDC seems to be looking at. It sure makes sense to me that a younger overall herd age structure would provide the best means of limiting the spread of communicable disease.

And Minnesota removed APR's in the wild deer CWD area.
__________________
Healthy Habitat, Healthy Deer, Less Antler Obsession-All for the Sake of our Hunting Tradition

NRA Life Member
Muskies, Inc. Life Member
Minnesota Deer Hunters Association
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-26-2012, 02:02 PM
Billb66's Avatar
Billb66 Billb66 is offline
QDMA Life Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Putnam County MO (USDA Zone 5B)
Posts: 2,171
Default



The whole thing just tears me up!!!

Thank God MDC did not decide to try and rid those counties of deer altogether.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-26-2012, 08:02 PM
horntagger's Avatar
horntagger horntagger is offline
QDMA Life Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Southeast Missouri
Posts: 1,215
Default

They killed like 600 at ground zero this winter.

If I was the landowner I would contact a lawyer to get all my habitat money back since now those landowner have no deer.
__________________
We live in a world that has woods, and those woods have to be hunted by men with bows. Who's gonna do it? You?

Master Wildlifer
Deer Steward I
Deer Steward II
Deer Steward III
QDMA Life Member

Like North American Wildlife and Habitat on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/pages/North...51224058415401

www.northamericanwildlifeandhabitat.com
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-28-2012, 09:03 AM
sandbur sandbur is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Minnesota (old USDA 3, new zone 4)
Posts: 11,129
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by B100888 View Post
PA is surrounded by cwd, Have more deer farms than alot of states put together and have never had a case of cwd. Things that make ya go hmmm!

Just a view from MInnesota. We had four domestic deer and elk farms that were infected with CWD in different areas of our state.. The state tested wild deer in these areas. There were no positive wild deer until about 1 year after the largest infected \domestic facility (by size) that also had problems with maintaining fences and keeping gates closed. This may have occurred after the facililty was out of business from what I have read. Then we got our first positive wild deer in the area.

Now we have another domestic elk/red deer facility in another area of the state with positive CWD.

You can continue to defend the tame deer industry, but your point of view does not seem to indicate what has happened in Missouri and Minnesota.
__________________
Healthy Habitat, Healthy Deer, Less Antler Obsession-All for the Sake of our Hunting Tradition

NRA Life Member
Muskies, Inc. Life Member
Minnesota Deer Hunters Association
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.