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Old 04-08-2012, 09:48 AM
Savannah Savannah is offline
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Default Can a lawn roller be too heavy for a food plot?

Ok I am looking for a lawn roller for two reason. 1) mash down my lawn after winter to smooth it out. 2) food plot prep. Over the last few years I have planted a bunch of annual plots like brassicas's etc etc. After I dragged the plot and laid the seed I was done. I let the rain do the work then. When getting a roller, can it be too heavy where the seed has a hard time breaking the ground? I am looking at one a tractor supply which is 920lbs when full. If I roll, seed, then roll again could I be pushing brassicas, winter peas, oats, etc to hard?

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Old 04-08-2012, 12:03 PM
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Side Hill Growler Side Hill Growler is offline
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The roller wont be heavy enough. I bought a 6' roller that you fill with water and towed behind my Polaris 700. The clover sprouted in the ATV tracks about a week before the clover in the roller track. I sold the roller at a yard sale and use my UTV to compact the soil. Eliminated the storage problem and the plots sprout faster. Now a cultipacker is a different animal.
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Old 04-08-2012, 12:11 PM
Savannah Savannah is offline
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I dont get it. This roller is almost 1000 lbs loaded, my kawasaki prairie 700 is 600lbs tops. Why would your atv do so much better when its lighter? I know its a smaller track as the roller takes up more space but not much? Hmmm.
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Old 04-08-2012, 03:01 PM
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That 700 lbs is covering about 12" of tire, that roller is 3 or 4'. The gound psi is what you need, the weight is irrelevant.
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Old 04-08-2012, 09:25 PM
LetMGrow LetMGrow is offline
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I have used a roller for over 10 years. I roll the soil before seeding and roll again after seeding. Small seed such as clover shouldn't be buried at all but you do need good seed to soil contact. I have never seen the tracks from my atv result in earlier plant growth than any other area of the plot. I till all my plots as the last step before seeding. Perhaps the soil is fluffy enough so the roller smoothes the tracks over.
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:52 AM
broom_jm broom_jm is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenlantern412 View Post
Ok I am looking for a lawn roller for two reason. 1) mash down my lawn after winter to smooth it out. 2) food plot prep. Over the last few years I have planted a bunch of annual plots like brassicas's etc etc. After I dragged the plot and laid the seed I was done. I let the rain do the work then. When getting a roller, can it be too heavy where the seed has a hard time breaking the ground? I am looking at one a tractor supply which is 920lbs when full. If I roll, seed, then roll again could I be pushing brassicas, winter peas, oats, etc to hard?

For very small seeds, like clover and brassica, the lawn roller will work well. You can't say the same for peas, oats or other larger seeds. This variation is why a cultipacker is a much more appropriate tool for serious food-plotters.

Say you're planting a mix of winter rye, oats, peas, clover and forage radish. You've got 2 distinctly different seed sizes to contend with. The bigger stuff should be lightly tilled or disced in an inch or more, while the clover and radish should be just barely be covered, if at all. (You could also drill in the bigger seeds) An excellent approach for planting a mix like this would be to disc in the 3 bigger seeds, then cultipack. Broadcast the smaller seeds and then cultipack again, or maybe use the lawn roller.

If you've already got a pretty smooth food plot surface, and you are ONLY planting small-seeded plants like clover and brassica, you could prep the surface with one pass of the lawn roller, broadcast your seed, and then roll again. This would work very well, for those small seeds.
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