Go Back   QDMA Forums > Habitat Management > Food Plots for Whitetails

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-27-2012, 09:56 PM
evers12 evers12 is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 20
Default eagle beans fertilizer question

I'm planning on planting about 5 acres of eagle forage soybeans this spring. My PH level is good at 6.5. My question is what type of fertilizer would you all suggest. I plan on adding innoculant to the seed. I don't think nitrogen would be needed. Do I need to add fertilizer at all? any thoughts?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-27-2012, 10:00 PM
yoderj@cox.net yoderj@cox.net is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 8,054
Default

You want to add P and K in amounts recommend by your soil test. How much you need really depends on your soil.

After you get the basics down, it is probably worth checking Sulphur and Boron. I'm to the point where I'll be trying to get those levels up a bit.

Thanks,

Jack
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-27-2012, 10:11 PM
nyplotter's Avatar
nyplotter nyplotter is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NY
Posts: 1,008
Default

Jack, is it best to disc P&K in or can it be broadcasted before rain? Curious myself but hopefully the answer may also help Evers12. Thanks!
__________________
>>>---------->
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-27-2012, 11:07 PM
yoderj@cox.net yoderj@cox.net is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 8,054
Default

I'm mostly no-tilling so I'm just top dressing with fertilizer. I don't have a fertilizer option on my drill. When I broadcast, I do lightly till in the fertilizer. As you say, before a rain is best. I have MAP and DAP as options for P and I usually use MAP because it has more P and less N. A few years back they raised the price on one compared to the other (can't remember which right now). When I talked to the manager at the coop, he told me the price increase was because they added a polymer coating so the N would last longer if you don't get rain. The following year, the prices equalized when they added the polymer to the other. So, the advantage of disking in the fertilizer may depend on somewhat on the fertilizer.

There are some soil guys much smarter than me on this stuff that will hopefully chime in. I'm learning, but my soils understanding is that of a layman.

Thanks,

Jack

Last edited by yoderj@cox.net : 03-27-2012 at 11:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-28-2012, 12:25 AM
dgallow's Avatar
dgallow dgallow is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NW AR/SE OK
Posts: 7,638
Default Depends on soil P,K,OM, soil texture, yield goals etc

The 6.5 pH isn't usefull in itself.....high magnesium or high sodium soils don't grow very good beans but each can have pH 6.5.

Tell us more about your soil test?

For a first time bean field, some will double innoculate the seed.

Beans and other legumes fix about 50-75% of their N under average to ideal conditions. The balance of that N either comes from soil OM or from that applied (manures or inorganic N).

PS....high yiled beans are fed N well beyond what most imagine!
__________________
SARE: Managing Cover Crops Profitably
http://www.sare.org/publications/cov...covercrops.pdf

Good white clover read: search for 'white clover'
http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B1251/B1251.htm

Back-to-basics - fertilizer information
http://www.back-to-basics.net/home

Quality of Native Plant Forage Species Important to White-tailed Deer and Goats in South Central Oklahoma.
https://www.noble.org/global/ag/wild.../cdversion.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-28-2012, 07:14 AM
banc123's Avatar
banc123 banc123 is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member. Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Hunt S.E. GA
Posts: 16,353
Default

I use bought a pallet of triple super phosphate and potash. Thats what I use. Disced in, it doesn't move much in the soil and I want it in the root zone from the get go.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-28-2012, 12:27 PM
evers12 evers12 is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 20
Default

I haven't done a complete soil test on the fields recently so I guess I need to do that first to see what it may or may not need. I've planted beans with good success in the past and always just applied a 12-12-12 fertilizer. Last year I really had a tough time because I didn't get my beans in until early June with a really wet spring. They never did take off with heavy browsing and dry conditions. The year before when I planted in early May I ended up having 6 foot high beans...amazing stuff! Even local farmers were impressed.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-28-2012, 08:57 PM
welka welka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 543
Default

May sound anti-soil test, but we planted Eagle beans 3 years in a row with pH 6-7, didn't use any fertilizer and had great yield. Soil test said we needed P and K, but decided to try it without it and it worked fine. You definitely want to add a scarecrow per acre to give the beans a chance to get high enough to withstand browse for 1-2 months. BTW - decided to go with regular RR group 5 beans as they did as good as Eagle, produced seeds, and were half the price. Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-29-2012, 07:12 AM
blumsden's Avatar
blumsden blumsden is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Jacksonville, Alabama
Posts: 2,724
Default

Without a soil test, i would put out about 300lbs/acre of 0-20-20 and disk it in. I never add nitrogen in the summer, it just promotes weed growth, although i've never planted Eagle beans. I'm no soil expert, but my food plots always look good.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-29-2012, 07:51 AM
banc123's Avatar
banc123 banc123 is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member. Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Hunt S.E. GA
Posts: 16,353
Default

Just remember that how a plant looks isn't reflective of if its adding nutritional value or maximizing nutritional value. Might still get eaten, but a plot with proper fertilization could add much more nutrition lb per lb vs one without. Even though they both look good. Whats not in the soil, can't end up in the deer.

I have one plot that calls for 68 lbs per acre and one for 100lb of P , so it really does depend soil by soil.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.