Go Back   QDMA Forums > Habitat Management > Food Plots for Whitetails

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-20-2011, 07:21 PM
winterquartersmgr's Avatar
winterquartersmgr winterquartersmgr is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: tensas parish, lousiana
Posts: 1,912
Default Wheat turning yellow

I have planted 450 ac of wheat oats and clover in my plots. I noticed that the last few weeks the plots are all turning yellow. I think it is going to be a fertilizer issue or the lack there of but just wanted to see if any of you have had that problem. The club I work for doesn't think any of the plots ever need fertilizer because we are in the MS River flood plain. I have been here for three years and planted 3 times in the fall and twice in the spring and never been allowed to fertilize the plots.
__________________
Justin F.

Certified Deer Steward 1
Certified Deer Steward 2
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-20-2011, 08:10 PM
TrademarkTexan's Avatar
TrademarkTexan TrademarkTexan is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Southlake, Texas
Posts: 2,843
Send a message via AIM to TrademarkTexan
Default

Yellowing is usually caused by lack of Nitrogen, iron, or magnesium. It can also be caused by PH that is way high or low (causing nutrient uptake issues).

It can also be caused by environmental problems such as too wet or too dry, or too hot or too cold, or by certain types of insect damage...so...pretty much anything

If you look for bugs, check soil moisture, and haven't had extreme temperatures, then it's probably a fertility issue.
__________________
Plot near Abilene, Texas
Clay/Loam Soils, high PH (8.0)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-20-2011, 08:11 PM
Soybean Man's Avatar
Soybean Man Soybean Man is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Weiner, AR
Posts: 783
Default

More than likely it is N or S. As a crop consultant, we always recommend Sulfer on our sandy soils planted to wheat. If it is a wet year, then waterlogging could be the culprit. Put out some Amonium sulfate and urea side by side to see what greens up quicker right before a rain.
__________________
www.eagleseed.com -Home of Large Lad and Big Fellow Roundup Ready Forage Soybean
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-20-2011, 09:55 PM
winterquartersmgr's Avatar
winterquartersmgr winterquartersmgr is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: tensas parish, lousiana
Posts: 1,912
Default

I was thinking it was N also. The club has not put out any fert in 10 years They really don't want to do soil test either. I told them they were cheap and they told me that the ones they had done 20 years ago said this is the best gournd in the country and that we didn't need anything.
__________________
Justin F.

Certified Deer Steward 1
Certified Deer Steward 2
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-20-2011, 10:35 PM
Hoseman Hoseman is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Courtland, VA
Posts: 619
Default

My wheat/rye/oats plots are a little yellow too. They are in sandy soil and I figured it was lacking in N fertilizer and the extreme cold winter. I don't think it is worth it to top dress with fertilizer as it will green up in March when the weather turns a little warmer. Did I read it correctly that you had 450 acres in food plots? Wow! I think if I had that much acreage it would have to be harvested!
__________________
Southampton County, Virginia
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-21-2011, 08:53 AM
EastALHunter's Avatar
EastALHunter EastALHunter is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Salem, AL
Posts: 1,094
Default Let me get this straight...

Quote:
Originally Posted by winterquartersmgr View Post
I was thinking it was N also. The club has not put out any fert in 10 years They really don't want to do soil test either. I told them they were cheap and they told me that the ones they had done 20 years ago said this is the best gournd in the country and that we didn't need anything.

they think you can farm for 20 years without taking anything from the soil that needs to be replaced? Wow. How many wheat farmers never fertilize? The answer is zero. If I were you, I would get soil samples and pay for them myself. That way, when they fire you for the plots failing, you'll have some data in case you need legal help. You might even want to get a local ag extension or NRCS office to come out and do the samples so they are "unbiased". Good luck!
__________________

http://dbwoutdoors.com
Property Management Consulting
Eagle, Sweet Spot, Daikon Radishes,
and Tecomate Seed
ANTLER BOOST Feed
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-21-2011, 11:52 AM
shack shack is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Gulf Breeze Florida.
Posts: 516
Default

Old habits are sometimes hard to break. I would pick a plot that you like to hunt and do a soil sample, pay for it yourself, it is less than $10.00. Then do whatever is recommeded. You will see a difference. Be sure to put a cage on it to show growth. Just my 2 cents.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-21-2011, 11:58 AM
CaveCreek CaveCreek is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hill Country, TX
Posts: 4,839
Default

Winterquarters:

Man you got a lot on your plate, but an awsome job (its sounds) as well.

First and foremost, I'm sure your soil is lacking somewheres (given the lands fertility program, or lack thereof, But as for your most current Yellowing, my Guess is that it is in Response to some of the Cold we have been getting.

Wish I had a better computer/internet connection, and had taken some photos of the neighbors field across the way...

Anyhow, nearly every yr (here in South Central Texas) our Oats Fields yellow when we get hit with Strong Freezes, but typically they green back up, (Which they already have). they are now doing so in response to well Recieved Moisture that we went without in the last two/three months.

This yellowing can occur with both the Oats and Wheat, but will typically be much more pronounced with the oats... Check and see if your if the yellowing seems scattered, as in oats yellow, wheat more green. That would be a real quick assurance of what's going on.

But non-the-less, get to soil testing, even if its out of your own pocket. Check with local Ag extension, and or Universities that provide the testing service. Here in Texas, the Extension service "sometimes" even covers the costs of the soil samples" All and all, with that much acreage, There could litterally be thousands of dollars being thrown away "poetically speaking" without properly monitoring, ammending your soil fertility.

(Especially with all the cowpeas you grow). If you are where you can grow them (Properly innoculated) and produce good quantities of growth, then Nitrogen will not be your issue.... But small ammendments of other nutrients, can often produce astounding differences in production of Legumes.

Best of Luck!
__________________
Look to the Heavens, As there lies the true answers in life. No mountain too tall, no ocean too wide.
And I, obsessed with the land, but dedicated to the One who created it.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-21-2011, 01:35 PM
winterquartersmgr's Avatar
winterquartersmgr winterquartersmgr is offline
QDMA Sponsor Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: tensas parish, lousiana
Posts: 1,912
Default

I think it is mix of the cold and lack of N. The 20 ac test plot where the cowpeas were is very green.
__________________
Justin F.

Certified Deer Steward 1
Certified Deer Steward 2
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-21-2011, 04:43 PM
RLW RLW is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Central West Virginia
Posts: 571
Default

Don't you just love it when someone hires you to do a job because you are an expert and then they tell you how to do it.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.