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  #531  
Old 03-18-2012, 09:40 AM
Lickcreek Lickcreek is offline
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*** see preceding page for beginning of post***


Nothing at all like the "whips" I often plant from bare root stock



He dropped off 4 trees...2 Liberty



Quote:
Liberty Apple
‘Liberty’ often is described as the most disease resistant of the human-food apples for humid climates. Although it is cold-hardy, it has also been grown successfully in southern California. It typically is recommended for USDA Zones 4 to 8. It was an experimental cross made in 1955 by The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. Its name was selected to denote freedom from disease. The tree is a productive annual bearer of dark red 2 - 3” fruits that are very good to eat. Fruit ripens from September to November depending on location, and hangs past maturity. Bloom Period = B (mid-season). Some reports indicate ‘Liberty’ is self-fertile, but we suggest planting it with another pollen compatible variety like Grimes Golden, Sundance, William’s Pride, or Yates. It is practically immune to apple scab; resistant to cedar apple rust, and resistant to fire blight.

and two Sundance



Quote:
Sundance Apple
Sundance’s original name was Co-op 29. It was an experimental cross made in 1964 at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and transferred to Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana for testing. It is the collaborative product of the PRI (Purdue University, Rutgers University, and The University of Illinois) disease resistant apple breeding program. Sundance is a patented and trade-marked apple licensed exclusively to Gardens Alive, Inc. and marketed through Gurneys Seed and Nursery Company and Henry Fields Seed and Nursery Company. Wildlife Growers is fortunate to be able to make this excellent tasting disease-resistant apple available to our customers. It typically is recommended for USDA Zones 5 to 8, but, cold tolerance beyond Zone 5 has not been adequately tested. It received its name because of its yellow color with occasional orange-red blush. The tree is a productive bearer that has slightly heavier crops in alternate years (slightly biennial). The fruit measures about 3”, ripens in late-September through late-October depending on location; and hangs on the tree for up to a month without loss of quality. Bloom Period = C (late mid-season). It is self-infertile and should be planted with another pollen compatible variety like Enterprise, Gold Rush, Grimes Golden, Liberty, or William’s Pride. It is practically immune to apple scab; very resistant to fire blight, and resistant to cedar apple rust.

Like all of my trees they will be put to the test planted next to hundreds of red cedar trees

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  #532  
Old 03-18-2012, 09:40 AM
Lickcreek Lickcreek is offline
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and in heavy clay soils (well drained)



It's a bit of a job cutting the bags off so one needs a very sharp knife and perhaps a pruning shear.



I planted two in my yard orchard...



partly because my yard also doubles as a whitetail observatory...

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  #533  
Old 03-18-2012, 09:41 AM
Lickcreek Lickcreek is offline
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and two in my centralized feeding area where last years drought killed some of my trees from Century Farms (my fault and no reflection on Dave)



Not exactly prime soil or in a spot where they can be "babied"



I have more bare root trees coming from Adams County Nursery in a few weeks so I'm looking forward to comparing the performance and growth of the Osborn trees to those already established and new plantings. These trees are not $15 trees although I as of yet do not know what the 2013 pricing will be? For those in a hurry to see the "fruits of their labors"...these trees might be worth keeping an eye on....so stay tuned...
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  #534  
Old 03-18-2012, 09:05 PM
johnrpb johnrpb is offline
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Lickcreek,
Those are fine looking trees, looking forward to seeing how they do. Do you know what diameter rootmaker knit fabric bags those were? I've been thinking about doing something similar.
Thanks
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  #535  
Old 03-19-2012, 05:09 PM
Jhoss Jhoss is offline
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Default Hey! I've got a Sundance!

Mine is just starting its 3rd year at my place...anxious to try one1 Good luck - keep us posted.
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  #536  
Old 03-19-2012, 05:46 PM
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Dang Paul....you got more deer eating your lawn than I got in my food plots.
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  #537  
Old 03-20-2012, 08:37 AM
dtabor dtabor is offline
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HAHA CanOpener, that is exactly what I was thinking when I saw the pic!!
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  #538  
Old 04-03-2012, 01:45 PM
Lickcreek Lickcreek is offline
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Quote:
Do you know what diameter rootmaker knit fabric bags those were?

I'll see if I can find out but they are pretty good size.

Quote:
Dang Paul....you got more deer eating your lawn than I got in my food plots.

lol...it is "interesting" around here...

I planted some chestnuts on March 24th in Rootmaker cells



They were already sprouted while in the fridge all winter



I just use Miracle Gro potting soil...press them in



and cover them up and water them well

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The life and times of dbltree

Informational threads on growing food plots and improving habitat for whitetails

Dbltree's Corner - Food Plot Links

When I get where I'm going...don't cry for me down here

Dbltree Habitat Enhancement - Paul & Jesse Knox, Birmingham, Iowa

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  #539  
Old 04-03-2012, 01:46 PM
Lickcreek Lickcreek is offline
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and on the 30th some were already popping up!



These were all hybrid chestnuts from Oikos Tree Crops and I have had outstanding success with acorns and chestnuts from them



I also planted some Dwarf Chinkapin Chestnuts from Nebraska but not so sure about them yet?



None germinated in the fridge nor have they come up yet but we'll see. Very inexpensive way to start young chestnut and oak seedlings and certainly a far higher survivability rate versus planting bare root stock and a whole lot easier to plant as well....
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The life and times of dbltree

Informational threads on growing food plots and improving habitat for whitetails

Dbltree's Corner - Food Plot Links

When I get where I'm going...don't cry for me down here

Dbltree Habitat Enhancement - Paul & Jesse Knox, Birmingham, Iowa

dbltree2000@yahoo.com jknox0623@gmail.com

Joshua 24:15
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  #540  
Old 04-07-2012, 10:05 AM
Lickcreek Lickcreek is offline
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Tree Screens

I still see too many fields wide open and exposed to roadways where deer are vulnerable to poachers or even neighbors who may be tempted to do something they otherwise would not.

Tree screens are imperative and conifers make the best screens anywhere across the country! Here is an example of a red cedar screen planted by a previous landowner, then a barbed wire fence erected afterwards by the new landowner...both important in keep deer safe and poachers out!



While the trees are growing I plant Egyptian Wheat screens adjacent to the fence and trees



Eventually the field will be protected for many lifetimes when the cedars mature...in the meantime the fence makes it difficult for a poacher to just "run out in the field" with emphasis on "difficult"....certainly not impossible. The Egyptian Wheat lasts thru the fall and early winter to keep things hidden as the trees grow.

On top of that we are planting a mix of Cave In Rock and Kanlow switchgrass in the field area to further insulate and protect the whitetails living there.

In Iowa...it's tough to grow anything but red cedars because bucks will scrub any other conifers to death each fall but in northern states deer may find the cedars a delicacy during winter months and there Norway spruce may be a better option.

On a recent trip to speak at a QDMA seminar a few members took me on a tour of their farms and shared their spruce plantings



These spruce were planted 25 years ago by a member and his dad and now it is outstanding bedding cover and screening



Conifers are an essential element in you habitat tool chest and those with the foresight to plant them will be rewarded richly in due time. Make screening a priority and use any combination that will work for you in your area to get the job done, then add conifers and NWSG in appropriate areas to increase bedding cover areas.

North Central Reforestation carries all types of conifers

Prairie seed Farms carries all types of switchgrass seed

Iowa-Missouri Hybrids will ship small quantities of EW seed...call Aaron Palm at 641-919-1695 to order
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The life and times of dbltree

Informational threads on growing food plots and improving habitat for whitetails

Dbltree's Corner - Food Plot Links

When I get where I'm going...don't cry for me down here

Dbltree Habitat Enhancement - Paul & Jesse Knox, Birmingham, Iowa

dbltree2000@yahoo.com jknox0623@gmail.com

Joshua 24:15
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