Go Back   QDMA Forums > Habitat Management > Food Plots for Whitetails

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-02-2010, 02:26 PM
tyler0421 tyler0421 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Destin, FL
Posts: 163
Default Anyone heard of teaweed?

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr168

Looks like it could benefit us Sotherners. Seed is abvailable for purchase yet though!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-02-2010, 06:33 PM
sagehill's Avatar
sagehill sagehill is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: birmingham,al
Posts: 72
Default

i think it would be awesome to try out some plots of the teaweed. seems like it would be the best summer nutrition available. i wonder how they got seed. i guess you could spend a week walking around with a bag looking for teaweed and rob the seeds. lol
__________________
311 acres in central alabama
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-02-2010, 11:41 PM
tyler0421 tyler0421 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Destin, FL
Posts: 163
Default

I'm not sure how they got it but, I'm sure it will be on the market soon after this. I would hope so if all is true. Sounds like a weed so, it sounds like it could be a cheap route.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-03-2013, 02:44 PM
SouthernHabitats SouthernHabitats is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: North Florida
Posts: 13
Smile Teaweed Seed

http://southernhabitats.com/sweet-tea-seed.asp
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-03-2013, 10:46 PM
aaron2691 aaron2691 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Bibb County Alabama
Posts: 408
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernHabitats View Post

what is the weight of that 3000 seed "shaker" would be curious to know what I am paying per lb for seed and how large an area would that plant if I want to start a stand of that for summer production?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-04-2013, 07:23 PM
Soybean Man's Avatar
Soybean Man Soybean Man is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Weiner, AR
Posts: 783
Default

If what you are talking about is the "Teaweed" we have in Arkansas with the scientific name, "Prickly Sida", then be careful or you will have it forever. We fight it every year in soybeans and I have never seen a deer touch it here. Our fields have a natural seed bank. Roundup will kill it though. We have more trouble with non-Roundup soybean seed fields.
__________________
www.eagleseed.com -Home of Large Lad and Big Fellow Roundup Ready Forage Soybean

Last edited by Soybean Man : 02-04-2013 at 07:26 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-05-2013, 10:31 AM
unclefish's Avatar
unclefish unclefish is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Hunt in Burleson County, TX
Posts: 287
Default

Interesting. We have it on my parents place and have never seen a deer in it. We do have some good dove shoots over it when the seeds drop though.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-05-2013, 10:55 AM
dgallow's Avatar
dgallow dgallow is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NW AR/SE OK
Posts: 7,807
Default Native weeds (aka poor man's clover)....

....can be expensive and in many cases 'unnecessary to purchase/plant'. Soils which are poorly arable are great places for weeds. Class 6 (many old pastures/brushy fields) or class 7 (timbered) are good places to create a soil disturbance (prescribed fire, TSI, light discing, mob grazing etc) and glean the benefit of natural succession with a plethora of weeds ensuing for deer to browse. Deer are highly selective and tend to browse the highest quality weed parts.

This link gives CP, TDN, and mineral content of native plants consumed by deer in a 2-3 yr study period.

QUALITY OF NATIVE PLANT FORAGE SPECIES IMPORTANT TO WHITE-TAILED DEER AND GOATS IN SOUTH CENTRAL OKLAHOMA
http://www.noble.org/global/ag/wildl.../cdversion.pdf

Mileage may vary in the weeds deer consume in other areas!

Just remember the two prerequisites for weed seed germination from the soil bank are: 1) direct sunlight exposure and 2) optimum soil temperature. Don't forget the importance of woody cover and tall NWSG to compliment the food source.




+
__________________
SARE: Managing Cover Crops Profitably
http://www.sare.org/publications/cov...covercrops.pdf

Good white clover read: search for 'white clover'
http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B1251/B1251.htm

Back-to-basics - fertilizer information
http://www.back-to-basics.net/home

Quality of Native Plant Forage Species Important to White-tailed Deer and Goats in South Central Oklahoma.
https://www.noble.org/global/ag/wild.../cdversion.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-25-2013, 12:01 PM
SouthernHabitats SouthernHabitats is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: North Florida
Posts: 13
Default Sweet Tea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soybean Man View Post
If what you are talking about is the "Teaweed" we have in Arkansas with the scientific name, "Prickly Sida", then be careful or you will have it forever. We fight it every year in soybeans and I have never seen a deer touch it here. Our fields have a natural seed bank. Roundup will kill it though. We have more trouble with non-Roundup soybean seed fields.

Sweet Tea is a selection of Sida ulmifolia (formerly acuta) Prickly Sida is Sida spinosa. That said, this plant is also aggressive. The simple answer to preventing it from spreading outside of the planted area is to brush the seed off your tires after driving through it. The rubber tire is virtually the ONLY seed dispersal vector I have seen for this plant. That is why it is seen along roadways and around barns. This plant is a perennial, therefore you won't usually see it where the ground is being tilled much. I'm not sure about it's cousin, Prickly Sida. I can confidently say that Sweet Tea is the best thing that ever happened to summer food plots in the Southeast. Deer love it, it is a tough perennial that is drought and shade tolerant and it provides high levels of protein and minerals. On top of that it stands up to heavy browsing. Give it a shot! Let me know if I can help in any way. Thanks!

Joe Reams,III
President
Southern Habitats, LLC
www.southernhabitats.com
joe@southernhabitats.com
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-27-2013, 03:21 AM
JRM North Florida Boy JRM North Florida Boy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Florida
Posts: 2
Default

I've used this sweet tea seed from Southern Habitats and at first I thought it might be a scam. I tried many different seed and hunting products that just never worked out in North Florida, South Georgia habitat I hunt. It came up and at first it was slow to grow, I assumed because of unusually cold weather we had in Florida early this year. I planted it in early March. Then all of a sudden we started getting some rain and the sweet tea came on and grew like a weed to about 1 and foot tall. Then the problem I had was the deer wasn’t touching it. This is a problem I’ve had growing new things in my hunting area before. Then unlike some products I’ve tried before, I started see a few deer browse on the sweet tea. Then a short time later I went to check it and there was nothing but bare stems and deer tracks everywhere. The only thing I hope to see now is if it grows back as all the literature I’ve read about it said it would. The place I planted the sweet tea was a cleaned up fifth row of pine trees about a 150 yards long, a place that planting traditional food plots is almost impossible and it seems to be working out like I had hoped.

Other knowledge I have gained over my 20+ years of hunting and planting food plots is research what you need to plant from a major university in the state you plan on hunting and planting food plots in. Take their advice and plant the seed varieties made to grow in the area’s you plan on hunting. The other is do soil test on your food plots. Waters Agricultural labs, Bio-logic labs / A and L analytical lab or one of the universities labs. It’s well worth the cost that range from $6-$13 per test.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-03-2013, 06:18 PM
SouthernHabitats SouthernHabitats is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: North Florida
Posts: 13
Smile Sweet Tea Wildlife Seed

Thanks JRM for the positive feedback. I have several fields of Sweet Tea in seed production and we don't even protect ours when we first set it out in plugs. For some reason the deer don't browse it until it gets a little size on it. I thought this might be because of the time of year but it holds true no matter what time of year, when it's small they don't browse it. Now this has been MY experience so I want to be careful to say it may not be that way for everyone else. Also, we are learning that Sweet Tea doesn't germinate as well in high pH soil - especially when it has been recently limed with dolomite. Not sure why but it seems to avoid limestone altogether. Florida soils are still great though because the limestone is underneath an acidic layer. I am recommending keeping the pH between about 4.5 and 6.5. It does great in organic matter such as leaf litter and pinestraw. Check out our Southern Habitats Facebook page and take a look at our Sweet Tea photo album.


Thanks!

Joe Reams, III
President
Southern Habitats, LLC
joe@southernhabitats.com
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.