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Old 05-18-2009, 01:12 PM
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Default John Deere 7000, 71, and 7200 planters

Looking at picking up a small row planter of 2 to 4 rows and having never used one before looking for input. Looking to plant corn, soybeans, chufa, milo, etc. Also No Till is really wanted. Everyone is pointing me to the JD 7000 or 71 flex units. What is the difference between these units, pros, cons, etc. Lets throw in the 7200 unit for arguement
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Old 05-18-2009, 11:51 PM
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I use a four row wide 7000 planter. It has 38 inch row spacing. It works great for food plots. I have used it for five years with no problems. The planter can be switched between finger pickup corn meters, soybean cups and sorghum cups. I also use it for planting sweet corn in my garden. I paid $800 for the planter.
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:58 AM
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No other opinions on these planters. I found a 4 row model 71 and a 4 row model 7000. Both are pull types, no till and require rear hydralics, which I currently don't have on my tractor. The tractor I have is a 2008 New Holland 2220 (34 horsepower) FWD. Is this tractor large enough to pull these, assuming I add the rear hydralics? Or should I continue looking for a 3pt hitch model?
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Old 05-20-2009, 08:06 AM
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I seriously doubt you have enough tractor unless you're working flat ground only. I've got a 65 horse & when I'm pulling hills with my 7000 4 row, it lugs it pretty good.
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Old 05-20-2009, 08:44 AM
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Here is a Ford 2 row 3 pt corn planter on ebay which is basically the same as my John Deere planter. They arent pretty but they are basic, simple and is easy to see if anything is wrong with them. I dont have fertilizer buckets anymore as they have disintegrated over the years but the seed hoppers work fine and I just finished planting 4 acres with this small junker this month. I think if you look around you can find one of these for around 500-750. Easy to check out by putting some seed in the hoppers,get the planter off the ground and turn the packing wheels and hope you see corn coming down the pipes.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Ford-2-row-plant...3A2%7C294%3A50
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Old 05-20-2009, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lassig View Post
Looking at picking up a small row planter of 2 to 4 rows and having never used one before looking for input. Looking to plant corn, soybeans, chufa, milo, etc. Also No Till is really wanted. Everyone is pointing me to the JD 7000 or 71 flex units. What is the difference between these units, pros, cons, etc. Lets throw in the 7200 unit for arguement

By the size of your tractor the 4 row may be a little much. YOu will likely need hyd. to raise and lower the unit.
The 7000's are nice planters, but many of them are pretty tired. I bought and re-build a 7000 6 row a few years ago. Paid $2700 for the planter and spent likely more than that on parts. I was a bunch of work, but now I have a nice machine. I think the 71 units are only for tilled ground, and some of the 7000's are no-till. Look for a "7000 Conservation"
which means no-till with heavy duty down pressure springs. I only pland corn and beans with mine - switch out the corn meters with radial bean meters...takes about 10 min.

As far as the 7200...I think it's similar to the 7000 with just a few upgrades - maby the closing wheel pressure setting mechanism and depth setting mechanism.

I've no tilled with mine but mostly used it in tilled ground. There are problems with the seed trench getting closed with my current set up so I'm looking into what they call "spaded closing wheels" to prevent this. I've only no tilled corn once (into and old clover field) and it did prettty well. However, I'm usually planting corn into worked ground because I had to incorporate the N.

Here's pics of the one I re-built:
http://www.qdmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=9254
Send me a PM and I'll give ya more details if needed.

As I was looking for planters, I noticed that the ones with fert. attachments were always more rusted out. That's why there are no fert. boxes on the planter.

If you end up with one of the Deere's, Shoup Mfg. is a good place for replacement parts.

With the old planters like a 7000 it's not uncommon to have to replace the bushings on the row units $5, the openers$40, the front coulters$25, gauge wheel arms $70, seed tube and guard $35 and possibly the corn or bean meter itself...about $170. If you are looking at a 4 row planter, multiply these figures X 4 rows.
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Last edited by Great Big : 05-20-2009 at 10:42 AM. Reason: error
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Old 05-22-2009, 10:14 AM
RobertD RobertD is offline
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Default Let me try to clear this up

JD 7100 planters are 3 pt hitch mounted and TRANSMISSION driven, meaning one or two wheels on the ground drive a shaft wich drives the transmission (a grouping of sprockets, usually in the center of the planter, which are used to set the seeding rate or population).

JD 7000 planters are the same units, they are just on a pull type hitch. They will work on smaller tractors, provided they have a hyd outlet to raise and lower them. 7200's may also have dry (or liquid) fertilizer hoppers. Being on a longer frame gives them somewhere to mount.

JD 71 Planters are UNIT planters, meaning the rear wheel on the unit drives the seed hopper. They can be mounted or on a pull type frame (rare). You CAN get no-till attatchments that bolt to the frame (hitch) for these, but they are not as numerous or easy to find as 7000/7200 style.

JD 7200 are newer versions of the 7000 (as 7300's are of 7100's). The newer ones can be equipped with a vacuum metering system, which is the BOMB, but more trouble than your average plotter wants to fool with.

JD 7000 & 7100 units come in 2 types, Finger pickup/Soybean feed cup or Plate planters (like the 71's). Plate planters are simpler IMHO, and are the norm down South.

What makes the 2 row 7100 and 7000 planters you see for sale tricky, is that the drive wheel has to run down 1 middle (usually they put it in the center). This is where the transmission normally was located. This requires that they move the transmission to one end or the other. Not necessarily a bad thing, but it HAS to be done right.
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Old 05-23-2009, 12:27 AM
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Anyone know where I can pick up two no till coulters to mount on the front of my 7000?
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Old 05-23-2009, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mohican View Post
Anyone know where I can pick up two no till coulters to mount on the front of my 7000?


Local JD dealer or Shoup Mfg.com. Good luck
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Old 05-24-2009, 12:43 PM
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Thanks for the responses, I was at the farm the last couple of days finishing up planting my spring plots. Still on the fense if I going to do this or not. I really like to buy new to avoid down time and I know how it was used/cared for. That said I blow out a bearing on my new (last summer) tiller on Thursday afternoon. Thankfully my implement dealer was still open and had another unit in stock that he loaned me to finish up. I would of sucks big time to take vacation time and then not finish the job.
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Old 08-13-2009, 09:16 AM
Westwind Westwind is offline
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Default Meters/plate change

Good thread, I'ver read it several times.

Could somebody discuss or describe the difference in changing seed size for the 71 flex vs. the 7000? Is it a big project?

I want to be able to plant field corn as well as the sh2 sweet corn which has a small, "shrunken" seed. I am thinking a popcorn plate might work with the plate planter.
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:09 PM
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For the last 2 years I have planted sweet corn with my regular corn meters, and it has worked great. For soybeans I have used the kinze bean meeters, and with those you can find a range of plates to plant a variety of seed sizes as well. I have used the JD bean cups, but they really just spill seed, and its hard to get the rates very accurate.
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Old 08-20-2009, 03:34 PM
JBGulf Shores JBGulf Shores is offline
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Default This is a VERY interesting thread!

Which model is already no till with fertilizer?
and if you dont get the fertilizer option, how do you spread it? is it broadcast then?

That rebuild thread was COOL Every spring and fall I start feeling the itch to try one of these!

Thanks for all the first hand info!
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Old 08-20-2009, 09:11 PM
wolc123 wolc123 is offline
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I find that corn plots of 1-2 acres in size are best for attracting deer during gun season, bucks especially. I put in as much as I think it will take to last me until the end of hunting season, which is usually around (10) acres total. Where I am, one mean, old doe will basically take over larger plots keeping all but her own group out. For these smaller plots, a 2-row planter is best and a JD model 246 is my favorite. These are not no-till, which would not fit in with my "semi-organic" method of foodplotting anyhow. The only fertilizer I put down on my corn is 50-75 lbs/acre at planting time and the dry fertilizer row-applicators on the model 246 gives me the best bang for the buck from this light application. My corn gets most of its nitrogen from decaying clover that I plow under prior to planting. It is nearly impossible to find a model 71 with dry fertilizer applicators which renders them unsuitable for my method. Sometimes, devious individuals will attempt to pass off insecticide hoppers as fertilizer on unsuspecting "suckers". Dont be fooled by this as they are totally inappropriate for fertilizer application for reasons of insufficient volume, and corrosion resistance. If it is smaller than the seed hopper, it is not meant for fertilizer. Even at the light rates I put down, I am filling my much larger fert hoppers 2-3 times for every seed hopper re-fill. 246's are old, but if you can find one in good shape, it will last you a lifetime or more. They do use the same seed plates as 71's, and can still be bought new. Finding one with good fertilizer hoppers is sometimes tough as corrosion takes a toll if not properly cared for. A good rinse after each use, and coating with oil at the end of the season should keep mine good for my grandkids to use someday.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:15 PM
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Default frame for 71

I plan on getting 2 John Deere 71 planters from a local farm supply shop. I will then need to make a frame so I can hook it up to my tractor. I've seen pictures of 2 frames; 1 with the lift pin aboout even with the bottom of the bar the 71s get bolted to, the other wil the lift pins about 9" below the bar. Anyone know how I can figure out what height the pins should be set at for the planter to work properly?
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by new farmer in PA View Post
I plan on getting 2 John Deere 71 planters from a local farm supply shop. I will then need to make a frame so I can hook it up to my tractor. I've seen pictures of 2 frames; 1 with the lift pin aboout even with the bottom of the bar the 71s get bolted to, the other wil the lift pins about 9" below the bar. Anyone know how I can figure out what height the pins should be set at for the planter to work properly?

PM me your email address, i have some hitch info i'll send you.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:02 AM
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Default Tanner Equipment

Check out Tanner Equipment Co. in the Kankakee, IL area. They build custom planter set ups by cutting down larger planters. He mostly deals with JD 7000 series planters. I have bought planters from him in the past and am currently looking into getting another. He makes 3 pt hitch 2 row planters with transmissions for around $2200. You can Google and find them on the web but suggest you call and speak with them.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBGulf Shores View Post
Which model is already no till with fertilizer?
and if you dont get the fertilizer option, how do you spread it? is it broadcast then?

That rebuild thread was COOL Every spring and fall I start feeling the itch to try one of these!

Thanks for all the first hand info!

No-till and Fertilizer can for the most part both be added as options so there may not be a certain model number which contains both. Just have to look at each unit to make sure what they actually have.

Liquid fertilizer is usually put in furrow or right next to the furrow. Dry is usually placed in a second furrow just a little deeper and off set to one side of the actual seed furrows to keep from burning corn seeds.
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