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Old 03-09-2009, 12:35 PM
2dawoodz 2dawoodz is offline
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Default Home made drag harrow

I am new to planting and maintaining food plots and have read quite a bit of helpful info on the basics. The landowner of the property I will be hunting has a tractor, disc harrow bushhog and root rake. He only wants to plant cool seaon plots of wheat, rye, clover. Based on my research we will need something to level and firm the plot after discing. I am considering building a drag harrow using chain link fence (8' long x 4' wide) with 4' length of 3-4" metal pipe filled with concrete attached to the tail with U bolts. Another 4' length of pipe will be U bolted to the front with a sufficient length of cable attached to the ends for hooking to the tractor when pulling. Anything I should add or change about this design? The drag harrows I have seen have prongs portruding on one side. How could I add something like this to my design? Additinal U bolts?

Also, would it be beneficial to pull the root rake through the disced plots prior to dragging?

These are all existing plots that have planted each fall for the past 5 years by another individual with his own equipment.

Thanks for your suggesitions!

Last edited by 2dawoodz : 03-09-2009 at 12:37 PM.
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Old 03-09-2009, 12:51 PM
tractorg25 tractorg25 is offline
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If you have access to a welder you can make small hooks from 1/8 in cold roll. Starting with 8in long piece bend it over in the middle. Than weld the two legs together one inch from the bend. Now spread the two legs out at 20 to 30 degree and bend both legs down You will need to make several of theses. to attach to the chain link open the eye at the bended end and use heavy tie wire to lace to the fence.
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Old 03-09-2009, 08:29 PM
D Hunter D Hunter is offline
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We use a drag of chain link fence behind a 4 wheeler. We rigged it several ways and had a hard time with it coming apart until we found a way that seemed to work time after time in rough conditions with very little stopping to re rig it. We used simply a log chain with hooks at each end, three cinder blocks and a piece of chain link fence. The no fail way of rigging it is to lay the three blocks end to end about 2 feet from the end of the fencing. Lay the short end of fencing over the blocks and against the fencing laying flat on the ground. Put the log chain through a loop on the 4 whler and center it in the middle with each end of the chain of equal lengths. Now take the hooks, go through the fence at the end of the loop, through the two end cinder blocks, through the top of the overlapped fence, then hook the hooks on the bottom layer of fencing. Now when you pull forward you pull the bottom of the fencing against the back side of the cinder blocks. Between the square edges of the blocks and the irregularities of the fence it breaks up all but the biggest and hardest clods. Leaves a nice finished surface. Did I make it clear as mud how to do it?If not I will try to make it more clear, It is not as hard as I made it sound. "D"
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Old 03-09-2009, 10:25 PM
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AR Coon Hunter AR Coon Hunter is offline
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Originally Posted by D Hunter View Post
We use a drag of chain link fence behind a 4 wheeler. We rigged it several ways and had a hard time with it coming apart until we found a way that seemed to work time after time in rough conditions with very little stopping to re rig it. We used simply a log chain with hooks at each end, three cinder blocks and a piece of chain link fence. The no fail way of rigging it is to lay the three blocks end to end about 2 feet from the end of the fencing. Lay the short end of fencing over the blocks and against the fencing laying flat on the ground. Put the log chain through a loop on the 4 whler and center it in the middle with each end of the chain of equal lengths. Now take the hooks, go through the fence at the end of the loop, through the two end cinder blocks, through the top of the overlapped fence, then hook the hooks on the bottom layer of fencing. Now when you pull forward you pull the bottom of the fencing against the back side of the cinder blocks. Between the square edges of the blocks and the irregularities of the fence it breaks up all but the biggest and hardest clods. Leaves a nice finished surface. Did I make it clear as mud how to do it?If not I will try to make it more clear, It is not as hard as I made it sound. "D"


Got any pics that was clear as mud
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Old 03-10-2009, 05:42 AM
D Hunter D Hunter is offline
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Sorry, no pics. Drag is at the deer woods 200 miles away.

Basically make a loop of chain link fence over the blocks. Now you have a row of blocks surrounded by chain link fence. Rounded on one end and a flat drag on the other, blocks in the rounded part. Chain goes through the rounded part, through the cinder blocks. Then come out through the top of the short overlapping part of the fencing, then through the bottom of the fencing and hook to it. The blocks can't come out the top because the fencing is over it and under it. They can't come out the sides because the log chain goes through the middle of them and hooks in the chain on the back side. Better? "D"
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Old 03-10-2009, 01:54 PM
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Sorry, no pics. Drag is at the deer woods 200 miles away.

Basically make a loop of chain link fence over the blocks. Now you have a row of blocks surrounded by chain link fence. Rounded on one end and a flat drag on the other, blocks in the rounded part. Chain goes through the rounded part, through the cinder blocks. Then come out through the top of the short overlapping part of the fencing, then through the bottom of the fencing and hook to it. The blocks can't come out the top because the fencing is over it and under it. They can't come out the sides because the log chain goes through the middle of them and hooks in the chain on the back side. Better? "D"

Thanks for the added info
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Old 03-10-2009, 06:51 PM
John C. John C. is offline
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Didn't you say the owner has a root rake for the tractor? Is it like this one?
Name:  rake.gif
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if it is just use this to level the field after discing. If you want to lightly drag the fence after sowing seed, then wire it to the rake and let the rake down low enough for the fence to make the contact desired and not the rake. If you are planting beans, cowpeas, oat, or wheat I don't see why you couldn't use the rake to cover the seed. I did this with rye in my back yard after buying my house and got a great stand that way
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Old 03-11-2009, 03:23 PM
2dawoodz 2dawoodz is offline
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Didn't you say the owner has a root rake for the tractor? Is it like this one?
Attachment 12825

if it is just use this to level the field after discing. If you want to lightly drag the fence after sowing seed, then wire it to the rake and let the rake down low enough for the fence to make the contact desired and not the rake. If you are planting beans, cowpeas, oat, or wheat I don't see why you couldn't use the rake to cover the seed. I did this with rye in my back yard after buying my house and got a great stand that way

Yep, his rake is very similar and I wondered how it could be used besides removing debris.

Thanks for your suggestion! I will definitely give it a try. Landowner just told me he'd like me to plant some millet for doves so that will be my first plot experience. Wish me luck. I most likely will be back asking more rookie questions.
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