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Old 02-02-2009, 02:41 PM
ststubbl ststubbl is offline
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Default ford 8n tractor recomendations?

I Have Seen Quite A Few Of These For Sale Lately For Cheep. Anybody Have Any Opinions On These For Small Food Plots And Mowing? How Much Could You Expect To Spend To Get A Good One In Good Shape Thanks
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:07 PM
RobertD RobertD is offline
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Default Got any wrench's?

They are great tractors considering their age. Several things to keep in mind.

They have what is known as a "LIVE" PTO. Which means it is driven off the transmission.

The drawback is that, when operating a bush hog, or other pto driven implement of any size, you can push in the clutch and the momentum of the bush hog is still driving the tractor forward. Re-read that VERY CAREFULLY.

LOTS of people have driven into ditches, off bluffs, into briar patches, etc. due to this design feature.

There is a simple remedy, called an overunning cltch. It looks like a PTO shaft adapter, and will only allow the tractor to turn the bush hog. When the opposite tries to occur, the clutch will ratchet and prevent disaster.

If you have access to a tester, get a compression test.

There is also a difference in ages of machines. I think they are referred to as front or side distributor models. I don't remember which one is preferable, and my Ford man is out of pocket. Sorry. Good luck.
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:22 PM
1ArTaxman 1ArTaxman is offline
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Default 8n

The Ford 8N is a pretty good little tractor to bushhog or pull light, small implements. If your soil is heavy clay or wet and boggy the 8N will not provide much pulling power. I have had an 8N & a 9N and made due until I could get a larger tractor. I used primarily to bushhog and pulled light disc-harrow and occassionally pulled a disc-breaker (similar to a breaking plow only shaped like a large disc). They are risky w/o an overrun clutch, which is very inexpensive. I would not hesitate to buy one to put in small food plots. You will want one with a side mount distributor because you will be changing points. The front mount is a bit troublesome to work on. The 8N I owned was I believe the last year they built them, a 1952 model. It served me well on hilly, rocky Arkansas Ozark soil.
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Old 02-02-2009, 05:33 PM
Tioga Tines Tioga Tines is offline
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Default 8N Brakes

I do not own an 8N, and never have. However, I know several people who do own them. They seem to be pretty good tractors given their age, and parts are readily available. Several 8N owners have told me that the old Fords have a well earned reputation for brake issues (as in the brakes do not work). This can be a major issue if you have any hills to deal with. If your land is flat - the 8N could serve you well.
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Old 02-02-2009, 08:22 PM
wolc123 wolc123 is offline
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The 51-52 8n's are my favorite all time tractor. These are the years with the side distributer and proofmeter and are the most refined form of the first modern, utility tractor, the Ford n-series. I use mine for any job that does not benefit a lot from 4wd. There is no tractor I would rather have on my 2-row corn planter which happens to be my favorite plotting tool. The power/weight ratio, fuel efficiency, parts availability, and durability are all better than the NAA, and 600 series that replaced them. Many folks dont like the lack of live hydraulics but, as already mentioned, a $50 overrunning coupler makes most of the troubles with that go away. If you can find a 51 or 52 in decent shape for under $2500 you got a pretty good deal. The older 9n's and 2ns (1938-1947) are significantly less effective with only 3 forward gears vs the 8n's 4, lack of position control on the hydraulics, and brake pedals on opposite sides. They are still ok and only a hp or 2 less than the 8n's , but I wouldnt pay over $1500 for one in decent shape. the 48-49 8ns give you the additional fwd gear, position control and brakes on opposite sides, and the 50 gives you the side distributer, but with the 51-52, you get it all. An 8n will plow 1 acre/hr on a 2 bottom 12" plow in average soil conditions and handle a 5ft brush hog.
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Old 02-03-2009, 08:23 AM
sam2145871 sam2145871 is offline
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My father used a '51 Ford Ferguson TO-30 which is close to the 8 and 9N for 26 years to do everything. He plowed snow, built a hydraulic winch and boom setup to skid wood, plowed plots, and also ran a bush hog with it. It's in pretty rough shape now, but we never had to worry about it starting. One thing we had problems with is the front main bushing, but that's about it. One thing I would get for it if you buy one is a good set of bear paw chains and possibly some front weights.
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Old 02-03-2009, 08:37 AM
tractorg25 tractorg25 is offline
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Default 8n

I have restored many of these little tractors. The transmission driven PTO can be very dangerous with out having an overrunning clutch installed. The tractors require a lot of maintanence, regular tune ups is a must. Most of them have been converted to 12 volts. However you may still run across a 6volt positive ground out there. The brakes are very weak. They are a very good food plot tractor will handle a 5 to 6 ft disc, two bottom plow, 5ft bush hog, box blade, up to a 12 ft grain drill, etc. They have been used sense the 1940s. Most parts are readly availible. You do not need a lot of special tools except when repairing the hydraulic system. I worked with a saleman who once told me that an 8n was a try out tractor. What he ment by that was people would buy the 8n and determine if they really need a tractor. If so than the would later trade it in for a more modern diesel tractor with power steering and independent pto. Any way if you are mechanically inclined and don't mind working on the tractor on a regular basis it is a good machine and will perform well. My neighbor has one that has been in his family sense new. I personally have rebuilt that tractor twice in 20 yrs. It get used almost every day doing beef cattle choors. They have a good power to weight ratio. Ruggedly built. Easy to operate and just plain simple.
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Old 02-03-2009, 08:39 AM
tractorg25 tractorg25 is offline
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price wise any where from $800 to $4000 depending on condition. Some collectors are getting much higher prices. but we are not collectors.
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