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Old 02-06-2008, 10:26 PM
Dalusion Dalusion is offline
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Default indiana food plots

I have a question about food plotting in indiana. I am looking to attract and growth on antlers what would you suggest planting. First year trying the qdm and would like to do it right.

I live in Northern indiana and was thinking ladino, red clover, rape and chicory for pernnials with 2 annuals lablab vining peas, and sorghum. Then in fall planting buck forage oats (do not know what is in it) any ideas?
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Old 02-06-2008, 10:50 PM
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Sounds like a good plan. For the Fall I would plant the BIO MAXX, only problem is... I would need to hunt over it for a few weeks and make sure its doing what its suppose to.
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Old 02-06-2008, 11:47 PM
mibearbait mibearbait is offline
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Default Mid-Michigan

Here is what I planted in Michigan for last year, along with how effective they were in attracting wildlife. Prior to planting there was really limited reasons for deer to stay on the property. They basically used it as a pass through area. After planting the crops we had a whole new environment were we seen new trails appear and watched deer traveling to the property.

Clover/Alfalfa (2 acres) - deer activity nearly every time I was viewing the areas. But after they discovered the brassicas, this crop seemed to result a short nibble on the way to the brassicas.
Sorghum (1/4 acre) - Never seen a single deer in the area. In fact I never seen any wildlife other than song birds.
Corn/Soybeans (1/2 acre) - The beans never made it taller than a couple of inches and the corn reached about 5 feet but was eaten off (top foot of corn stalk and all) well before hunting season.
Sweet corn (few rows for family was not intended for the deer) - deer and coon cleaned it out before I got a chance to pick it.
Buck Forage Oats (1.5 acres) - Seen a few deer in the field but generally they were either making their way to the clover or brassicas.
Brassicas (1/2 acre then another 1/2 acre seeded later in the corn and soybean field) - the brassicas reached about 6 inches before the first frost and were eaten within a couple of weeks. Deer started on the bulbs shortly after the greens were gone. There have been plenty of deer activities in these fields during the winter.
Water - Not a crop but definitely an attractant. I built a small pond and initially filled it with well water, mother nature has been keeping filled. Though there is plenty of water accessible for wildlife in the area the pond seemed to be a convenience for them while in the area, they used it a lot. Plenty of turkey activity around the pond as well.

As I expected the corn and soybeans should have been planted in a much larger field (I would guess a couple of acres at least), but I believe that soybeans are a great early summer and fall attractant. The clover and alfalfa seem to be good nearly year round. The brassicas brought the deer in at the right time for deer hunting, and continues to be a source of food during the winter. Other attracting food sources that I have planted and will plant more this spring is apple and pear trees. I have one old apple tree on my property and only the apples that are out reach every get a chance to mature.
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Old 02-07-2008, 06:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalusion View Post
First year trying the qdm and would like to do it right.
For the record, QDM is a harvest guideline designed to produce a balanced buck age structure, a balanced sex ratio, and to keep the herd within the limitations of the habitat. You don't have to plant food plots to practice QDM. You can practice QDM right, and never plant a food plot.

What is QDM?

Quality Deer Management (QDM) is a management philosophy/practice that unites landowners, hunters, and managers in a common goal of producing biologically and socially balanced deer herds within existing environmental, social, and legal constraints. This approach typically involves the protection of young bucks (yearlings and some 2.5 year-olds) combined with an adequate harvest of female deer to maintain a healthy population in balance with existing habitat conditions and landowner desires. This level of deer management involves the production of quality deer (bucks, does, and fawns), quality habitat, quality hunting experiences, and, most importantly, quality hunters.

A successful QDM program requires an increased knowledge of deer biology and active participation in management. This level of involvement extends the role of the hunter from mere consumer to manager. The progression from education to understanding, and finally, to respect; bestows an ethical obligation upon the hunter to practice sound deer management. Consequently, to an increasing number of landowners and hunters, QDM is a desirable alternative to traditional management, which allows the harvest of any legal buck and few, if any, does.

QDM guidelines are formulated according to property-specific objectives, goals, and limitations. Participating hunters enjoy both the tangible and intangible benefits of this approach. Pleasure can be derived from each hunting experience, regardless if a shot is fired. What is important is the chance to harvest a quality buck - an opportunity lacking in many areas under traditional management. When a quality buck is taken on a QDM area, the pride can be shared by all property hunters because it was they who produced it by allowing it to reach the older age classes which are necessary for large bodies and antlers.

Now, back to the food plot discussion.
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Old 02-07-2008, 02:06 PM
Pigsticker Pigsticker is offline
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Default What we did in Indiana

I'm not sure if this helps or not but we planted about 7 different acres this year on new property in southeastern IN. We put in Buckforage oats, Purple top turnips, winter wheat, and clover we got from normal seed store. Untill everything froze over I watched deer after deer walk over everything to eat the clover. Next year we're going to plant a lot more clover and introduce some new plots.
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Old 02-07-2008, 06:22 PM
jbarrera jbarrera is offline
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Live in Northwest Indiana, Last 3 years have planted brassica's with no success (waste of money), Last spring planted 2 acres of chicory , clover, and alfalfa mix, mowed and fertilized in September, within 2 weeks plot was ate to stubble... plot thickened up again in late October and would see deer every night on stand. They really loved chicory after I fertilized. Also planted 2 acres of winter wheat and BFO in fall with brassica. Deer did not touch Brassica at all but did eat on BFO and winter wheat. Deer are still eating on wheat.... but completely igonore brassica and turnips.
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Old 02-07-2008, 10:20 PM
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I'd go with a clover/chicory plot as a nutrition plot. Brassica's are a toss up. Some places the deer just kill them and some places they want eat them. I really think it depends on the quality of food they have available late in the winter. Brassica's are low on a whitetails diet, but they will anilate a plot if there is not much else to eat. On our farms in Illinois the deer have mowed the brassica to the ground. You cant go wrong with oats in the winter. You could give the brassica a try and see what your deer do with them. They may eat them very well when it gets cold. Definatly go with the clover/chicory and plant a small plot of oats and brassica to see what the deer do with them. This picture is a brassica/oats food plot.
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Old 02-07-2008, 10:23 PM
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This is the same plot as the one above, a month earlier. Notice how green and full the plants are. They have not started to touch them yet. Did not get on them till around Christmas. Once they did though, oh boy did they wax them.
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Old 02-08-2008, 01:37 AM
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Default First time post

I'm in southern Indiana. Last year I put out an acre plot of evolved habitat. It had rape and rye grass and some other stuff in it. The deer seemed to use it. As I shot a nice doe that was grazing threw. This plot sits in a corner of a larger field that is used mostly for hay, probably around 20 acres. The larger field had a little rye grass in it, and what I believe was red clover? Does it grow natural on its own? So with the deer eating all that clover in the big field I saw no use in planting more. But this year I would like to try some rr beans. Do you think an acre if it was double seeded would stand a chance? The neighbor should have beans planted this year, because he planted corn two years in a row. Would the neighbors large field of beans give my plot a chance, before the deer mowed it down? Also Iv read that guys are broadcasting stuff right into the beans around September. What would work on this size plot and still have something left to hunt over come November. Thanks for a great forum with a lot a information.
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