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Old 08-10-2007, 03:52 PM
hillbilly archer hillbilly archer is offline
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Default Difference in bob oats and feed oats?

After much reading here I decided instead of getting BFO this fall I'll use oats from a local place, about 1/3 of the price. I read on here to make sure and get a grazing/winter hardy oat variety. My local store had bob oats and feed oats, 1 guy there said I wanted the feed oats, the other said I wanted bob oats. What say you?

Also, the guy that said to plant the bob oats, said when they used to carry the Buck Forage Oats a few years ago, he looked at the variety label and said they were the same variety, so I'd say I need bob oats if thats true. They are $10.70/ bag.

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Old 08-10-2007, 04:28 PM
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i've had great luck with the bob oats. don't know about it being the same variety as BFO though. I have also planted feed oats with success. Last year I planted some feed wheat and it did not do near as good as the cleaned wheat for seed in a different plot.
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Old 08-10-2007, 10:09 PM
westflgator westflgator is offline
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Default BFO are worth the extra money here in the south with long seasons

I have tried several different types, of oats, wheat, and mixes. I have never had the same success here in the south, as I have had with BFO. This is the reason why. BFO is a hybid winter hardy oat, that is a slow growing oat, unlike regular feed oats, and many of the varieties found in mixes. We have a long and late season here in FL and in Ala, the 2 states that I hunt. after the first 6 weeks or so most varieties of oats start getting a wider blade and start to get tougher, they have less nutritional value and loose their attractiveness. Our rut here is in late Jan and early Feb. BFO stays tender throughout the season. Attracting bucks during the rut for a quick fix of energy. We harvested 16 good bucks last year and most of them were harvested with BFO hanging out of their mouths.
By the way Forage Oats are not the same as BFO, they are like regular feed oats they get tough wide blades after a month or so. I have planted BFO side by side when I fist started planting them, try it for you self and see which one the deer will use if given a choice. Check out our pics, not bad for Alabama bucks.

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Old 08-11-2007, 08:31 AM
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I would go with the bob oats...they are not exactly like the BFO...BFO uses several different varieties of oats that have different maturing rates...gives you a longer season of palatability. At least that is what I am told.
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Old 08-11-2007, 05:00 PM
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Thanks for the replies, unfortunately, I dont have enough plot to plant both and see which the deer prefer. I have a 1/4 acre plot and a 1/2 acre plot, both on two seperate hunting grounds. I'll probably use the BFO and see how it goes, 1 bag should do what I need.
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Old 08-13-2007, 07:44 PM
westflgator westflgator is offline
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Default BFO is not a several varieties of oats.

I have talked with representatives of the seed company that developed BFO. How they discorverd that that variety was preferred by deer was by chance. They had several different varieties planted in test fields, (not mixed together) and as they were testing the oats for the different characteristcs (not related to food plots), they noticed that this BFO (as it was later named) was the field that most of the deer preferred over the other varieties. Thier conclusion was that deer preferred it over the other varieties because it grows slower, staying more tender, and thus being more nutritious and better tasting.
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Old 08-13-2007, 10:38 PM
Liv4Nov Liv4Nov is offline
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Field location has just as much to do with usage and preference as seed varity (if not more). Last year I planted 2 acres of oats side by side. I planted bin run feed oats next to the woods and 2 bags og BFO's about 150 yard out in the field. The deer were always in the bin runs in the evening, just because its were they came out 1st and felt more comfortable next to the woods. Once it got fully dark they would go out to the BFO's. Both plots were eaten to dirt by the middle of Oct.

If I had planted the BFO' next to the woods they would have gotten eaten 1st and the bin runs 2nd. Of course I am in SW PA and we still have tons of deer. Anything green is eaten.
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Old 08-14-2007, 08:47 AM
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Default Population and forage availability is definetley a factor

I agree with the last post, but where they tested these plots (in Arkansas I believe) there was several different test feilds of different varieties. And the ones with the BFO consistently had more deer in them. Here in Fl we don't have the populations that you have in PA, and the plots don't get as much usage, there is also more natural browse later in the year than what you guys have up there. And with most oats, wheat, and rye, they will start to get taller, wider blades and get tougher as the season goes on, Oct- Feb here in West FL. And BFO is by far (for this area) the best late season (which is when our rut is) plot I have found. I have done side by side in long narrow plots, and the deer will browse the BFO down while the other end gets very little usage. I know if you have large populations they are going to keep pretty much anything you plant eaten down, so it would be hard to tell what is preferred, and when you do a side by side comparison, it has to be just that side by side, same plot same conditions. Don't get me wrong for areas where you have a shorter season, and where it gets alot colder BFO may not be the best thing to plant. But here in the south I am a huge fan of BFO.
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Old 08-14-2007, 02:31 PM
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Back to the difference of Bob versus Feed oats. Oats sold as seed must have a germ of about 80 or 90%. Feed oat does not have to meet germ or purity requirements and may have been handled improperly for seed. This does not mean that it would not do the job. Bob oat is an old variety and may not be protected any more. Some varieties are protected and can only be sold as certified wheat if sold for seed. It is higher, because there is usually a royalty due to the originator such as a University.
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Old 08-14-2007, 06:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westflgator View Post
I have talked with representatives of the seed company that developed BFO. How they discorverd that that variety was preferred by deer was by chance. They had several different varieties planted in test fields, (not mixed together) and as they were testing the oats for the different characteristcs (not related to food plots), they noticed that this BFO (as it was later named) was the field that most of the deer preferred over the other varieties. Thier conclusion was that deer preferred it over the other varieties because it grows slower, staying more tender, and thus being more nutritious and better tasting.

Thank you sir...I will relay this info to the source that I heard it from.
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