Go Back   QDMA Forums > Habitat Management > Native Habitat/Forest Management

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-11-2012, 11:25 PM
HammerTime HammerTime is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Alabama
Posts: 22
Default Getting honey suckle started

I have a good idea how to start honey suckle.My question is will it grow down in the river bottoms?Would love to get some started on my lease along the river....
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-12-2012, 09:48 AM
LetMGrow LetMGrow is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern NY USDA 4B
Posts: 3,346
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HammerTime View Post
I have a good idea how to start honey suckle.My question is will it grow down in the river bottoms?Would love to get some started on my lease along the river....
I'd make sure the owner of your lease property approves of planting this stuff. If you get it going it will become invasive. There is really no nutritional value to the berries. From what I was told by an NRCS rep. the berries can and will be eaten by wildlife but it is actually detremental. The berries have a small sugar content but they tend to fill a stomach with something which is useless and will actually hurt wildlife, especially songbirds.
I spent hours pulling honeysuckle from 3 acres last spring where I planted spruce trees. Even 3' bushes had a root system with some roots going out 10 or more feet. They were too green to burn so I had to push them into a pile.
I wouldn't encourage establishing this stuff unless you never want to do anything else with the land around it.
Lynn
__________________
If you want to get something out of something, you must put something into it!
Member QDMA Since 2002 - NWTF - American Legion - Eagles Club - SCOPE - NCF2A - We The People of NY- AERA - NYSSA

This year, the year 1935, will go down in history. For the first time a civilized nation has full gun registration. Our streets will be safer, our police more efficient and the world will follow our lead into the future.
Adolf Hitler

MY VOTE IS NOT FOR SALE!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-12-2012, 12:27 PM
buckarood buckarood is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: east TN
Posts: 258
Default

I've killed several deer in honeysuckle patches, espeacially bad mast years.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-12-2012, 01:00 PM
LetMGrow LetMGrow is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern NY USDA 4B
Posts: 3,346
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by buckarood View Post
I've killed several deer in honeysuckle patches, espeacially bad mast years.

I agree there were deer there on occasion. But i'll reiterate one of the reasons I removed these was the poor nutrition they provided.
Just because an animal or bird has a full tummy doesn't mean they are getting food which will build strong structure and fat reserves they need for survival. The bioligist from NRCS likened this to a child eating only " Snikers " bars. While they feel full they aren't taking in something else healthy for existence. For this reason I pulled and brush hogged the honeysuckle and replaced it with food plots nearby which were healthier for the deer.
I saw more deer in that area this fall than I ever did when the honeysuckle was there. My grandson took his first deer out of one of those plots.
It also opened up the area so I could plant trees which will eventually offer protection and cover for the deer. I can mow between and around the freshly planted trees without trying to avoid the gangly honeysuckle bushes.
Lynn
__________________
If you want to get something out of something, you must put something into it!
Member QDMA Since 2002 - NWTF - American Legion - Eagles Club - SCOPE - NCF2A - We The People of NY- AERA - NYSSA

This year, the year 1935, will go down in history. For the first time a civilized nation has full gun registration. Our streets will be safer, our police more efficient and the world will follow our lead into the future.
Adolf Hitler

MY VOTE IS NOT FOR SALE!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-12-2012, 03:35 PM
letemgrow's Avatar
letemgrow letemgrow is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Olathe, KS/Mercer, MO
Posts: 8,453
Default

If it benefits deer, but is detrimental to diversity and other wildlife species...is it really worth spreading a possible invasive to shoot more deer?

There are native honeysuckle vines that deer will eat which will also benefit other species and not become invasive. If you are dead set on honeysuckle, why not try some of the native ones?
__________________
www.outreachoutdoors.com
Ozark Chinquapin Foundation
American Chestnut Cooperators Foundation
Zone 5B
"When a hunter is in a tree stand with high moral values and with the proper hunting ethics and richer for the experience, that hunter is 20 feet closer to God." Fred Bear
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-12-2012, 04:24 PM
LetMGrow LetMGrow is offline
QDMA Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern NY USDA 4B
Posts: 3,346
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by letemgrow View Post
If it benefits deer, but

One of the points I was making is the honeysuckle is NOT beneficial to deer or anything as a food source. This is what the bioligist from NRCS was trying to stress.
Lynn
__________________
If you want to get something out of something, you must put something into it!
Member QDMA Since 2002 - NWTF - American Legion - Eagles Club - SCOPE - NCF2A - We The People of NY- AERA - NYSSA

This year, the year 1935, will go down in history. For the first time a civilized nation has full gun registration. Our streets will be safer, our police more efficient and the world will follow our lead into the future.
Adolf Hitler

MY VOTE IS NOT FOR SALE!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-12-2012, 04:31 PM
HammerTime HammerTime is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Alabama
Posts: 22
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by letemgrow View Post
If it benefits deer, but is detrimental to diversity and other wildlife species...is it really worth spreading a possible invasive to shoot more deer?

There are native honeysuckle vines that deer will eat which will also benefit other species and not become invasive. If you are dead set on honeysuckle, why not try some of the native ones?

Thats exactly what I want to plant is the native honeysuckle.I don't want to start the japanese honeysuckle which very invasive correct?I have native honeysuckle behind my house that not as invasive as the jap honeysuckle.Landowner told me I can do whatever I want with the land he is cool.I know him very well.I want to plant it for deer browse and a place they can take good cover in...

Will it grow in the river bottoms in swampy areas like on ridges?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-12-2012, 06:15 PM
letemgrow's Avatar
letemgrow letemgrow is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Olathe, KS/Mercer, MO
Posts: 8,453
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HammerTime View Post
Thats exactly what I want to plant is the native honeysuckle.I don't want to start the japanese honeysuckle which very invasive correct?I have native honeysuckle behind my house that not as invasive as the jap honeysuckle.Landowner told me I can do whatever I want with the land he is cool.I know him very well.I want to plant it for deer browse and a place they can take good cover in...

Will it grow in the river bottoms in swampy areas like on ridges?

There are different types...let me see what all I can find for ya. Lonicera Flava is one of them.
__________________
www.outreachoutdoors.com
Ozark Chinquapin Foundation
American Chestnut Cooperators Foundation
Zone 5B
"When a hunter is in a tree stand with high moral values and with the proper hunting ethics and richer for the experience, that hunter is 20 feet closer to God." Fred Bear
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-12-2012, 08:48 PM
sagittarius67 sagittarius67 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wolfe Island, Ontario
Posts: 22
Default

If you want good cover near river bottoms, what about Willow shrubs? Just a thought.
__________________
The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago, the second best time is today
-Chinese proverb
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-13-2012, 01:16 AM
CaveCreek CaveCreek is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hill Country, TX
Posts: 4,839
Default

Holy cow! I just realized there are 2 let "m" grows in this forum.
Now I'm not sure who is who.

So which honeysuckle is being said not to have nutrition? The native honeysuckes in my state are thought to be good forages. Coral honeysuckle is probably the more common.

Regardless, I doubt the one being discussed has "no" nutrition. Sounds like more of an opinion to me.
__________________
Look to the Heavens, As there lies the true answers in life. No mountain too tall, no ocean too wide.
And I, obsessed with the land, but dedicated to the One who created it.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-13-2012, 01:46 AM
Massey135 Massey135 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,330
Default

LETMGROW - You and the NRCS guy might be right about the berries, but the rest of the plant is both nutritious and benificial to all sorts of wildlife. I can cite many studies that prove this, as well as years of observation. I wouldn't recommend planting it, because it is, without a doubt invasive. But to say its not beneficial to wildlife is a stretch( unless you are talking about just the berries)
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-13-2012, 07:26 AM
buckarood buckarood is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: east TN
Posts: 258
Default

I read somewhere that japanese honeysuckle was deer's favorite food. It is the only thing green in the winter in my area.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-13-2012, 11:21 AM
letemgrow's Avatar
letemgrow letemgrow is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Olathe, KS/Mercer, MO
Posts: 8,453
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Massey135 View Post
LETMGROW - You and the NRCS guy might be right about the berries, but the rest of the plant is both nutritious and benificial to all sorts of wildlife. I can cite many studies that prove this, as well as years of observation. I wouldn't recommend planting it, because it is, without a doubt invasive. But to say its not beneficial to wildlife is a stretch( unless you are talking about just the berries)

Is a monoculture beneficial? That is what I am talking about...not how much certain species favor a plant to browse it. It takes over which displaces a lot of natives that are beneficial to many more species of wildlife.
__________________
www.outreachoutdoors.com
Ozark Chinquapin Foundation
American Chestnut Cooperators Foundation
Zone 5B
"When a hunter is in a tree stand with high moral values and with the proper hunting ethics and richer for the experience, that hunter is 20 feet closer to God." Fred Bear
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-13-2012, 12:55 PM
CaveCreek CaveCreek is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hill Country, TX
Posts: 4,839
Default

need to designate that "jap" is being spoken of, or whatever species it is. Many native honeysuckles are not aggressive like this, and are in fact a good indicator of a healthy ecology in my location.

a berry, providing a water source to a bird species is going to be a benefit no matter how you look at it. and nutrition extends past fiber and protein. i ain't arguing against your point, large monocultures are no good. i just prefer to avoid the big generalizations.
__________________
Look to the Heavens, As there lies the true answers in life. No mountain too tall, no ocean too wide.
And I, obsessed with the land, but dedicated to the One who created it.

Last edited by CaveCreek : 02-13-2012 at 12:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.