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darkhollow1
10-14-2006, 09:53 PM
I am kind of new to TSI which a timber buyer introduced to me last Fall. I have done a fair amount of research and from what I have gathered Basswoods are considered cull trees to most. I mentioned eliminating a fair amount of Basswoods in my timber to the same buyer today and he did not recommend doing so. He seemed to think that there may be value to them at some point and it would be a good idea to hang on to them? I personally feel that they should be eliminated to promote more Oak variety. How do you all feel about Basswoods? Is there a valuable future for them? Would you or have you eliminated them on your property? Thanks A Lot!

kodiakswitchback
10-14-2006, 10:02 PM
I never thought there was much of a market for basswood atleast in our area except for pulpwood. I may be wrong

Side Hill Growler
10-14-2006, 11:57 PM
Basswood is soft. Wood carvers use it.

HabitatMD
10-15-2006, 12:40 AM
I think some window blinds are made from basswood. If they are somewhat big and straight, I'd get rid of them in the next sale. I'd kill 'em, they don't do me personally much good.

pinwheel
10-15-2006, 07:13 AM
Really depends on what your goals are. There is a market for them from a loggers point of view. As mentioned before, wood carvers use basswood. It's classified as a softwood, but it has a tight consistant grain.

As a softwood, they will grow fast creating cover. Not all trees need to be fruit or nut bearing to have value to wildlife. I've got a lot of river birch in certain areas of my property. They have little market value. I won't cull them because they mostly grow next to my creek to offer bank stabilization, they grow fast & they look cool.

Silver maple has always been considered a junk tree in this area. Now, it has definately found a market with the saw mills & timber buyers.

Personally, at this time, my cull trees are elm, locust & hickories under 8". Everything else is allowed to live. I'm not looking to create a timber just for logging. My primary purpose is wildlife. When I had a forester visit my farm last winter, his advice to me, based on my goals, was just what I'm doing.

Bob S
10-15-2006, 08:43 AM
Really depends on what your goals are.

That is the key. Your timber buyer may be more interested in your trees than your deer. Maybe you should have a wildlife consultant look at your land. Someone looking at your land from the point of view of what is best for the deer may have a different opinion of the Basswood.

darkhollow1
10-15-2006, 04:18 PM
Thanks A Lot for all the input!

farmlegend
10-16-2006, 11:11 AM
Basswood makes for a superb treestand tree. Esp. if they were cut many years ago, and have grown multiple "trunks" from the stump, to provide great concealment. Further, treesteps go into them like a snap! Can't say the same for my hickories, sugar maples, and oaks.

Since they sprout so readily from stumps, it's worth cutting them to produce cover and browse, not to mention trees to hunt from in about 30 years.

USFWC
10-25-2006, 02:25 AM
First of all, where are you located? That would have a big influence on what I tell you.

Secondly, a diversity of habitat types is one of the best things you can give your wildlife, so having some stands of basswood/sugar maple is not detrimental. They do have some benefit, especially when it is as hot as it was this last summer. The usually closed canopy and open understory allows for cooler temps and more air movement that gives deer a better place to hang out when the daytime temperatures soar. I spent this last summer in Minnesota doing contract work for the Forest Service and most of the deer I saw during the midday were in these stands.

Plus, depending on where you are, the basswood may be one of the more valuable trees in your area...as well as great stand sites as someone else stated.

bowhuntah
10-25-2006, 09:27 AM
Basswood is soft. Wood carvers use it.

Most duck decoys are carved from Basswood. My dad used to carve ducks and he had a side business selling Basswood to other local carvers.

USFWC
10-26-2006, 01:40 AM
One thing that I caught after re-reading this post is that a timber buyer is talking to you about TSI. What exactly did he tell you? You need to be very careful about accepting any offers...especially any TSI 'favors'. TSI usually implies that you don't get enough money to cover the cost of the improvements, otherwise it is usually referred to as a timber sale. Be extremely wary of anyone that approaches you...they may be ripping you off. Contact a forestry consultant in your area to look at your timber or just talk to before you do anything with the basswood. You could get enough money from a sale to fund a lot of habitat improvements on your property. That coupled with the possibility of federal cost share assistance could help you do a lot more with your land than you thought possible.


I am kind of new to TSI which a timber buyer introduced to me last Fall. I have done a fair amount of research and from what I have gathered Basswoods are considered cull trees to most. I mentioned eliminating a fair amount of Basswoods in my timber to the same buyer today and he did not recommend doing so. He seemed to think that there may be value to them at some point and it would be a good idea to hang on to them? I personally feel that they should be eliminated to promote more Oak variety. How do you all feel about Basswoods? Is there a valuable future for them? Would you or have you eliminated them on your property? Thanks A Lot!