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fuldraw
05-10-2013, 07:05 AM
found 120 acres in ne Missouri the whole property is enrolled in wrp

is that good?
can you build a cabin , put a pond in ,or even put food plots in?

can it be change or modified so you can do this kinda stuff ?
the whole property is fairly flat and was planted in trees in 2004.looks like a strong creek runs n to son the east line
i have sent an email to the listing agent just want to know a lot more before i start the phone dialog.


thanks mike

banc123
05-10-2013, 07:26 AM
Wetlands Restoration Project. You really can't tell what the restrictions are without looking at the specific plan of operation for that property. It will list the acreage covered and what is under the restriction. Any acreage covered will have restrictions on what alterations if any or building etc...can be done. Odds are the portion covered can't have any major usage or changes for 30 years or whatever the period in the plan states. You can hunt on it, but not farm, plot, build, etc.... As for a copy of the plan of operation and then before you buy make sure it's the one actually on file.

Redonthehead
05-10-2013, 08:37 AM
Wetlands Reserve Program: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/programs/easements/wetlands/

as banc said you would need the details of the contract, but odds are you can't build any permanent structure, and can't doze out any of those planted trees. First ask if its a 30 yr or perpetual contract.

I'd probably walk into the local NRCS office to talk to the person familiar with the specific land.

winterquartersmgr
05-10-2013, 08:40 AM
Banc pretty much covered it. Also you would not be able to get any of the payments as I understand it.

LetMGrow
05-10-2013, 09:00 AM
Wetlands Reserve Program: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/programs/easements/wetlands/

as banc said you would need the details of the contract, but odds are you can't build any permanent structure, and can't doze out any of those planted trees. First ask if its a 30 yr or perpetual contract.

I'd probably walk into the local NRCS office to talk to the person familiar with the specific land.

You need to get a copy of the contract in your hand and visit the local NRCS office. Be absolutely sure whoever you talk to knows what is really in the contract. NO "I think" "I'm not sure" answers.
Personally you couldn't run fast enough to give me a piece of property enrolled in this program. Then again I'm not a die hard waterfoul hunter.
Chances are someone has already sucked all the good from the contract and you will just suffer with it. Now the seller dumps it and moves on.
Good Luck,
Lynn

Mustard
05-10-2013, 09:12 AM
for the do's and dont's, the recorded easement deed is better than the restoration contract. it will be available at the county recorder's office and a realtor should be able to provide a copy.

is it a 30 year or permanent easement is the number 1 question. some states allow different management options with a compatible use authorization (food plots, Rx burns, limited grazing or haying).

how many acres are enrolled in the easement? is there a small chunk that wasn't enrolled?

a lot of these are listed at higher prices than what they are actually worth (my opinion). make an offer to the seller if you're interested... you never know.

if all you want is a place to hunt and not have to deal with public land, an easement may be your chance to get that because of the much reduced price.

Buzz 75
05-10-2013, 10:28 AM
WRP can be good programs and improvements, when placed on areas that make sense. Most times that is the whole point. If you have flood area or wetland areas, you cant do a whole lot else better than enrolling and receiving cost shares.

Check and see what the boundary of the WRP area within the property is. It should be fairly condensed to the wetland features, so the remaining property is not under the WRP rules or agreement.

Depending on what type of improvement was made, you may have the ability to plant crops. These most likely would be waterfowl plots, but...

I guess the point is that if you had a wetland, that is not legal to modify, or a flood prone low land that prohibited planting or growing other habitat, you could benefit with the WRP improvements and payments.

As stated, get the actual agreement and guidelines. Good luck to you.

fuldraw
05-11-2013, 02:18 PM
Talked to the realtor no builds allowed
And it floods ever heavy rain.thats why the owner enrolled the whole piece
Time to keep looking .
Thanks

hardwood11
05-11-2013, 06:27 PM
WRP is usually a third of the value or less compared to tillable or CRP farms. The current or prior owner has received a $$ payment for the easement.

Therefore the value is significantly reduced. Some buyers don't understand this, and then overpay for the property.

fuldraw
05-11-2013, 08:32 PM
They wanted like $1375 an acre
the area looks like 2000- 3500 is normal

ToddM
05-13-2013, 08:32 AM
I looked into one of these properties for sale a few years ago. I couldn't believe the language in the agreement- it gave the government the ability to dump refuse, remove trees, do whatever they wanted without the consent or approval of the "owner." No ability to plant food plots. The realtor was telling me that you could legally plant 10% in plots and could actually plant the whole thing and no one would care. I contacted the NRCS and they said you can't plant any of it in plots or do anything to the land. Can never build or put any permanent structure either not even a hunting blind. They said they'd previously told this particular realtor, who has a national TV show, to stop lying to people.

hardwood11
05-13-2013, 09:23 AM
WRP is very restrictive...the value of the land keeps dropping.
In my opinion, the government will eventually buy it at low prices for public hunting ground.

The biggest drawback is it takes the investment out of the equation.
No income and you still pay property taxes and have to control noxious weeds.

That being said, some landowners have received a very nice lump sum WRP check, which allows you to bank/retire/buy another farm...etc

wiscwhip
05-13-2013, 09:35 AM
WRP is very restrictive...the value of the land keeps dropping.
In my opinion, the government will eventually buy it at low prices for public hunting ground.

The biggest drawback is it takes the investment out of the equation.
No income and you still pay property taxes and have to control noxious weeds.

That being said, some landowners have received a very nice lump sum WRP check, which allows you to bank/retire/buy another farm...etc

Just a question on this, if anyone would know. In this type of program, given all the restrictions, could a person install water control structures and then would a person be able to lease the property to a duck hunting club for waterfowl hunting or something of that nature? Or would this be against the rules also? I would think that if this were possible one could get some type of income off of a place like this.

Buzz 75
05-13-2013, 09:57 AM
Yes, you can generally have a wrp improved property and lease it out for waterfowl hunting.

As stated, the original enrollee of wrp benefits the most as they can stop fighting mother nature, receive a cash incentive, receive annual payments for a period of time, and possible gain a recreational/hunting local.

The next purchaser is usually buying for recreation and hunting, not to make $ out of the deal. The selling price has to reflect that.

hardwood11
05-13-2013, 12:32 PM
Just a question on this, if anyone would know. In this type of program, given all the restrictions, could a person install water control structures and then would a person be able to lease the property to a duck hunting club for waterfowl hunting or something of that nature? Or would this be against the rules also? I would think that if this were possible one could get some type of income off of a place like this.

Should have no problem leasing WRP. Personally, I have some land going into a similar program to WRP (it is called RIM). They government is paying a large price to take it out of ag production.

I chose not to use WRP, because the feds would require me/and pay me to cut down all the cedar and spruce trees that they paid me to plant in the CRP program??:rolleyes:

wiscwhip
05-13-2013, 12:37 PM
I chose not to use WRP, because the feds would require me/and pay me to cut down all the cedar and spruce trees that they paid me to plant in the CRP program??:rolleyes:

That makes total sense?!?:rolleyes: But I suppose they do this all the time with all kinds of these programs.