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Massey135
04-10-2012, 09:11 PM
So, I've been planting chestnuts for 8 or 10 years, and I'm going to start selecting for "timber" type trees. Most of my dunstans have a spreading shape, but 2 of them are quite different and have a lot of american characteristics. First the typical spreading tree, this one is 7 years old.

Massey135
04-10-2012, 09:15 PM
This is one of the "american" type trees, much smaller nuts, longer, lance shaped pale green leaves and, it's going up not out. It's only 6 years old and it's putting on 4' of leader per year.

letemgrow
04-10-2012, 09:22 PM
Do you mean you are going to take out the other ones or are you just going to collect nuts for future plantings from the timber type ones?

Nothing grows like a chestnut. :D

Massey135
04-10-2012, 09:28 PM
I've noticed an incredible variation in the seedlings from this tree. I'm going to select the most desireable seedlings and plant them close to this one as a pollinator. These seedlings came from nuts off the above tree. Notice the shape of the leaves and the coloring. Also, the stem of the larger one is chestnut in color, while the other is green.

Massey135
04-10-2012, 09:34 PM
Ha - letemgrow, You beat me to it. I'm thinking about grafting some of the long leaders off the tall ones onto a cut stump from the spreading type. I know it would be crazy to cut a producing chestnut, but I'd really like to start my own little acf type experiment. I was going to ask y'all what you thought about that idea.

letemgrow
04-10-2012, 09:51 PM
Ha - letemgrow, You beat me to it. I'm thinking about grafting some of the long leaders off the tall ones onto a cut stump from the spreading type. I know it would be crazy to cut a producing chestnut, but I'd really like to start my own little acf type experiment. I was going to ask y'all what you thought about that idea.

The more American the better IMO. I can see those ridges on the leaves and that appears to be a Chinese trait...never seen those on my American chestnuts.

Besides, if you cut, then graft, they will be back producing/that size in no time off those large root systems.

Massey135
04-10-2012, 10:02 PM
My thoughts exactly. I planted 12 trees with the most american traits right next to this grove last weekend. I'm not going to be able to pollinate at bloom stage, so I figured I would just start grafting to get the best pollinators close to the two trees I like. My question was, should I graft onto limbs or a stump? Any ideas are appreciated. BTW, I'm planting the other trees in a grove about 400 yards from these. (the deer don't mind if they have chinese traits)

letemgrow
04-10-2012, 10:04 PM
My thoughts exactly. I planted 12 trees with the most american traits right next to this grove last weekend. I'm not going to be able to pollinate at bloom stage, so I figured I would just start grafting to get the best pollinators close to the two trees I like. My question was, should I graft onto limbs or a stump? Any ideas are appreciated. BTW, I'm planting the other trees in a grove about 400 yards from these. (the deer don't mind if they have chinese traits)

I would go with the stumps for grafting.

Massey135
04-10-2012, 10:14 PM
Another question. If chestnuts are not self pollinators, I assume it would do no good to graft onto a tree close to the host tree, am I correct?

letemgrow
04-11-2012, 03:07 PM
Another question. If chestnuts are not self pollinators, I assume it would do no good to graft onto a tree close to the host tree, am I correct?

I think you would be fine to have two "clones" close by....long as there is at least one more to pollinate them that is different with traits you desire.