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BBush
03-04-2012, 07:18 PM
This past fall, I planted a deer food plot that consisted mainly of a combination of wheat, oats, and white clover. I am now looking for a herbicide that I can spray on it that will kill the wheat and oats, but not the white clover. What I am trying to do is allow the white clover to continue to grow over the summer without having to compete with the wheat and oats. Does anyone have any suggestions on a herbicide that would work in my situation?

TrademarkTexan
03-04-2012, 07:25 PM
Clethodium (Select, Arrow, various trade names) will do exactly what you want, though you could also just let the grains go to seed and mow them later in the spring.

M. R. Byrd
03-04-2012, 08:05 PM
Mowing like Trademark said, which could be done about flag leaf stage which should take care of the wheat and would conserve moisture by not letting the plant take moisture for seed production.

LetMGrow
03-04-2012, 08:05 PM
Clethodium (Select, Arrow, various trade names) will do exactly what you want, though you could also just let the grains go to seed and mow them later in the spring.

I would agree. IMO the less herbicide we have to use, the better.
Lynn

schlag
03-04-2012, 08:05 PM
When you mow your clover to keep it in check in the summer, the winter wheat will eventually be killed off.

BBush
03-04-2012, 08:51 PM
Thanks for the answers. I actually have some Arrow 2EC that I had bought last fall to spray on another clover food plot. I didn't actually realize that it controls "volunteer" wheat until I looked it up on the product literature just a few minutes ago.

yoderj@cox.net
03-04-2012, 09:07 PM
Personally, I would not spray it unless you don't have frequent access to the property. Keeping the wheat mowed but growing by mowing will help keep weeds at bay until the clover fills in.

Semisane
03-04-2012, 09:13 PM
BBush, I'm 300 miles South of you in Greensburg, LA. My advice is if you want to save that clover by cutting, you'd better do it real soon. I waited too long last year and the wheat really took off in very early March. It shaded out the clover badly, and when I did get it cut (knee to thigh high) it just matted on top of everything and finished the job on killing the clover.

See my recent post "Clethodim Success", linked below.

http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=47894

BBush
03-04-2012, 09:54 PM
Semisane, I was actually out at my food plot yesterday and that is the very thing that is starting to happen. I plan on going back out there sometime this week and mowing it. I also will probably spray it with the clothedim to go ahead and take the wheat and oats out of the mix.

TrademarkTexan
03-04-2012, 10:27 PM
Semisane, I was actually out at my food plot yesterday and that is the very thing that is starting to happen. I plan on going back out there sometime this week and mowing it. I also will probably spray it with the clothedim to go ahead and take the wheat and oats out of the mix.

You probably know this already, but just a warning - don't mow and then spray...the wheat/oats may not take up enough chemical if the were just mowed. You could either spray and then mow later in the spring, or mow now, and spray after the wheat/oats have put on some new growth.

BBush
03-04-2012, 10:32 PM
I will actually spray sometime this week and then mow the plant in a couple of weeks when I am out turkey hunting.

jaytee
03-05-2012, 01:48 PM
Why would you want to kill the wheat, isn't it a food source too?

yoderj@cox.net
03-05-2012, 04:19 PM
Why would you want to kill the wheat, isn't it a food source too?

If you let the wheat head out you will get some deer use of it, but if you are trying to establish a perennial clover plot, the cereal shades out the clover giving is a slower start before summer weeds creep in. The forage is not used much by deer in the spring. It is older and less palatable by spring.

So, if your objective is to establish a perennial clover plot, it is best to manage the cereal. If you can't get to your plot for regular mowing, your only choice is to spray a grass selective herbicide and kill it. I prefer to simply keep the cereal mowed. I wait until the field hits about 12" and mow it back to 6" to 8". I think this is the best in the south where summer weeds are the issue. The cereal (I like winter rye but it is true with all) will continue to grow keeping weeds at bay but the clover will get enough light to establish well by summer when the cereal dies naturally.

Thanks,

Jack