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dogghr
07-24-2011, 03:00 PM
Always get a kick of seeing posts of plantings on fertile flat land so I thought I'd show something different, of working a virgin mountain hay field into a plot. The plot was broadcast seeded last year on unworked ground w/ brassicas on half and lickcreeks rye, awp, oats, red clover mix the other half. One wk ago I mowed and sprayed 41 pct gly. Yesterday I tilled at 2" then retilled at 6" after picking up rocks. Went ahead and cultipacked but in 2 weeks will retill 3" and seed again w/ brassicas on half and other half w/ rye/clover recipe. This 1 acre field is adjacent to a clover plot. I'll post pics of its success or failure in this drought as it progresses.

Massey135
07-24-2011, 03:42 PM
Really nice looking bare ground you've got there. Did you use Straight 41% Gly? That might be a bit of overkill, but it looks like it worked! Can't wait to see your results. Don't forget to fertilize those brassicas..

dogghr
07-24-2011, 04:52 PM
No I used 16 oz of 41 pct concentrate mixed w/ 9 gal. H2O. And you are correct about the fertilizer. When I overseeded into this field last year, I hit it w/ about 100# equivalent nitrogen using 19-19-19 and 34-0-0. Urea is not easy to find in this area. My ph is 6.9. Interestingly the over seed did quite well during our drought last fall even though the deer hit it immediately as it grew even w/ a record acorn crop to feed on.

bigmike
07-24-2011, 10:12 PM
Looking good! Another mountaintop farmer to share ideas with!

Tooln
07-25-2011, 07:37 AM
Beautiful looking country. I'd love to be near the mountains. :)

blumsden
07-25-2011, 07:37 AM
Man, thats a beautiful seed bed! I thought you said you had rocks. I need to post some pictures of mine. I can show you some rocks. Yea, us mountain folk have to put our food plots where we can, not where it's strategically to our advantage.:( Good luck this year.

bigmike
07-25-2011, 07:47 AM
Exactly! Wherever we can scrape out a flat or semiflat area.

buckfever37
07-25-2011, 09:22 AM
Those plots look great. I dont have mountains but most of my plots sure are not flat ground. When i plant i always worry about seed washing away lol

dgallow
07-25-2011, 05:38 PM
Always get a kick of seeing posts of plantings on fertile flat land so I thought I'd show something different, of working a virgin mountain hay field into a plot. The plot was broadcast seeded last year on unworked ground w/ brassicas on half and lickcreeks rye, awp, oats, red clover mix the other half. One wk ago I mowed and sprayed 41 pct gly. Yesterday I tilled at 2" then retilled at 6" after picking up rocks. Went ahead and cultipacked but in 2 weeks will retill 3" and seed again w/ brassicas on half and other half w/ rye/clover recipe. This 1 acre field is adjacent to a clover plot. I'll post pics of its success or failure in this drought as it progresses.

Beautifull scenery! :)

Poor soils can be made fertile, it just takes some hefty doses of fertilizer and a patient hand with the seed! :)

WV Huntaholic
07-26-2011, 10:13 PM
I love to see mountain top plots. Your pictures look a lot like my place in Lindside,WV. I just got up there last week to mow my winter rye, and it had grew about 36 inches tall since green up. Keep us posted with more pics.

dogghr
08-14-2011, 02:43 PM
Below are some pics of a brassica field 10 days after planting. This field was a hay/cattle field that had never been tilled. I tilled once after a gly application 2 wks previous, and second time last wk crosswise then lengthwise at 2 inches after spreading 19-19-19 and urea. It was then rolled w/ a cultipacker. Then 1# of purple top turnips, 1# of essex rape,and 2# of some 3 year old WHI Winter Greens were broadcast seeded and cultipacked. The ph had been worked to about 6.9 w/ lime applications last 2 years. Luckily it received a few showers during this past week which was a blessing.

dogghr
08-14-2011, 02:49 PM
This right side of the field will be planted early Sept. w/ rye/clover mix. It actually has brassicas sprouting from last years broadcast seeding into dead grass.

dogghr
08-14-2011, 03:14 PM
These 2 new plots will abutt this clover field where this boy likes to hang out.

bigmike
08-14-2011, 10:40 PM
Sweet plot and incredible buck!

robert lawson
08-15-2011, 06:17 AM
Always get a kick of seeing posts of plantings on fertile flat land so I thought I'd show something different, of working a virgin mountain hay field into a plot. The plot was broadcast seeded last year on unworked ground w/ brassicas on half and lickcreeks rye, awp, oats, red clover mix the other half. One wk ago I mowed and sprayed 41 pct gly. Yesterday I tilled at 2" then retilled at 6" after picking up rocks. Went ahead and cultipacked but in 2 weeks will retill 3" and seed again w/ brassicas on half and other half w/ rye/clover recipe. This 1 acre field is adjacent to a clover plot. I'll post pics of its success or failure in this drought as it progresses.

Why cultipack??? Firming soil tends to cause weed seed germination. I leave tilled soil alone until ready to plant. Sometimes I keep a new clover plot weed free just by tilling several times during the summer. Then I plant it to oats in the fall--cultipack--seed clover--cultipack again. Next year you have a weed free clover plot.

I would have planted my brassica now on newly tilled and cultipacked soil. Then gone back in 2-3 weeks and planted wr/clover on the other 1/2. It's a system that has worked well for me over the years.

God luck and happy hunting--looks like a beautiful spot.

buckhunter10
08-15-2011, 10:09 AM
These 2 new plots will abutt this clover field where this boy likes to hang out.

nice buck!! rumor in ohio, is WV boys dont got any big bucks....boy are they wrong!! Ill make sure to send some more of these non residents your way ;)

Bigd7400
08-15-2011, 10:56 AM
Good looking plot. Looks like you have got it down pat, and that is one HOSS of a buck!

dogghr
08-15-2011, 09:08 PM
Why cultipack??? Firming soil tends to cause weed seed germination. I leave tilled soil alone until ready to plant. Sometimes I keep a new clover plot weed free just by tilling several times during the summer. Then I plant it to oats in the fall--cultipack--seed clover--cultipack again. Next year you have a weed free clover plot.

I would have planted my brassica now on newly tilled and cultipacked soil. Then gone back in 2-3 weeks and planted wr/clover on the other 1/2. It's a system that has worked well for me over the years.

God luck and happy hunting--looks like a beautiful spot.

Can't argue w/ your technique but it has been so dry for 2 months that as loose as that soil was on this unprotected south facing ridge, the loss of top soil from high winds would have been likely. True it probably would have been minimal but w/ less than prime soil every grain of good soil is valuable. In addition, should a heavy rain occur, less soil would be washed off the steep slope if slightly compacted. And to be perfectly honest, it was a new cultipacker and I just wanted to try the %()* thing out. LOL

WV Huntaholic
08-15-2011, 09:25 PM
What a stud of a buck!:eek: Good luck this season...I hope you get him. I think I would fall out of my stand if that buck walked under it. Where did you find your packer at?

dogghr
08-16-2011, 09:32 PM
What a stud of a buck!:eek: Good luck this season...I hope you get him. I think I would fall out of my stand if that buck walked under it. Where did you find your packer at?

Bought cultipacker from Sweet Farm Equipment Co. in Kentucky. Web address is www.sweettractors.com. Shipped cheap. Very nice people to deal with. Had it in 3 days. Perfect shape except fresh green paint they put on for pics that gets on my gloves.

buckfever37
08-16-2011, 10:09 PM
Why cultipack??? Firming soil tends to cause weed seed germination. I leave tilled soil alone until ready to plant. Sometimes I keep a new clover plot weed free just by tilling several times during the summer. Then I plant it to oats in the fall--cultipack--seed clover--cultipack again. Next year you have a weed free clover plot.

I would have planted my brassica now on newly tilled and cultipacked soil. Then gone back in 2-3 weeks and planted wr/clover on the other 1/2. It's a system that has worked well for me over the years.

God luck and happy hunting--looks like a beautiful spot.

Wow thats a nice buck. You sure its not an iowa buck:D lol. I kinda have hard time believing cultilacking causes weed seed germination.

HabitatMD
08-16-2011, 10:13 PM
Flat ground is over rated. ;) Sure is some pretty county.

Thayer.qdma
08-16-2011, 10:20 PM
Yes, the undulations are very nice!

dogghr
09-05-2011, 05:28 PM
As promised, here are some pics of a brassica mixture planted on Aug 4. The field had never been previously tilled and sits on a southfacing ridgetop. Thus, it tends to be hot and dry even in normal years. It has been a hot, dry summer, and Aug received only spotty showers. I have been surprised w/ the germination and growth but the plants appear stressed and need rain badly.

dogghr
09-05-2011, 05:34 PM
Another pic facing to the west. The dirt to the right will be planted to WR and red clover. Again these are adjacent to a white clover plot. The white clover has been desimated the last two weeks from heavy browsing and the hot , dry conditions.

dogghr
09-10-2011, 09:01 PM
Thanks to Tropical storm Lee, we had about 5 inches of rain. I top dressed the brassica plot w/ 50# of urea. It was growing decent but looked stressed from lack of rain for the month, and the storm plus nitrogen seems to have set it off. Oddly the brassicas on the hottest , driest sections of this ridge top seemed to have grown the best, while the areas more moist and less direct heat haved lagged behind.

dogghr
09-10-2011, 09:03 PM
A few more pics

Massey135
09-10-2011, 09:15 PM
That second pic with the little shed/cabin makes me want to move in there for a year or four. Beautiful. I didn't know where Monroe county was till just now Googled it. We're neighbors ("cept for Craig county in between us). I once took the "scenic route" from 77 to Fincastle through your neck of the woods. Gorgeous country. I think Wv is one of the most underated places on earth.

RJ in LA
09-11-2011, 01:38 PM
Nice looking plots but beautiful scenery and a very nice buck.

buckhunter10
09-12-2011, 12:36 AM
whats the story behind the old house in the background? Is that your familys old place? That is very cool!

double drop
09-12-2011, 12:58 PM
I confess, this post pulled me right in. 20 minutes later I am feeling very satisfied after reading and looking at a beautiful area of west virginia, a great opportunity on a 150+ buck and I'm sure alot of hard work that has turned out great for you....congratulations
DD

dogghr
09-12-2011, 09:05 PM
That second pic with the little shed/cabin makes me want to move in there for a year or four. Beautiful. I didn't know where Monroe county was till just now Googled it. We're neighbors ("cept for Craig county in between us). I once took the "scenic route" from 77 to Fincastle through your neck of the woods. Gorgeous country. I think Wv is one of the most underated places on earth.

Yes we are neighbors as the crow flies. Thanks for the WV compliment. I have spent time in nearly all the states, and while I like each place, there is no place like the Appalachian Mountains from Maine to Georgia. They are indeed a well kept secret.

dogghr
09-12-2011, 09:14 PM
whats the story behind the old house in the background? Is that your familys old place? That is very cool!

The structure in the background is a chestnut log barn built early 1900's. It sits on the homeplace of the original owners of this land who are now deceased. They were not my family. Many of the farms in this area are owned by 4th and more generation families. Near this small farm are large tracks of relatively flat and highly productive farmland which I compete against in attracting deer.

buckhunter10
09-12-2011, 09:30 PM
The structure in the background is a chestnut log barn built early 1900's. It sits on the homeplace of the original owners of this land who are now deceased. They were not my family. Many of the farms in this area are owned by 4th and more generation families. Near this small farm are large tracks of relatively flat and highly productive farmland which I compete against in attracting deer.

that is a cool *** story! My grandparents/father are from appalachian PA though, but I love it there. I still have family back there and old places like that just tend to send me back in time! Great photos,and good luck!

dogghr
09-18-2011, 07:24 PM
Two weeks ago, we seeded the north half of this ridge top plot . Tilled in a combination of 19-19-19 and urea. It was then seeded with WR, RC, winter oats, and AWP. As luck would have it, we had about half inch of rain within a couple of days. As you can see, the seed indeed germinate and growth has been good . The deer have not touched this plot or the brassicas yet as they continue to hammer my other clover plots. No mast this year, so these plots will be well used once the large adjacent farms harvest their corn.

dogghr
09-18-2011, 07:27 PM
The brassica plot continues to do well, even though on this ridge it is not as tall as some of the other postings I see on this sight that were planted on more productive land.

dogghr
09-18-2011, 07:34 PM
In the distance, you can see another small plot that was planted this week in the bottom. Again it was seeded with the rye/clover mix. In the draw on the right sits another 3 year old white clover plot that cannot be seen. This is the worst mast at this farm in three years and I expect all these plots to be destroyed by winters end.

dogghr
09-18-2011, 07:37 PM
Some close up pics.

dogghr
10-14-2011, 06:00 PM
Here is a few progress pics of the brassica and rye/clover plots. Rain has occurred about every other week. The brassicas planted first week of Aug and the rye mix, the first week of sept.

dogghr
10-14-2011, 06:02 PM
Decent root growth

dogghr
10-14-2011, 06:17 PM
This farm road was seeded with rye/clover for about 100 yards leading from field edge. The deer hammer it entering and leaving the field. My stand sits to the right of this road near the inside corner of the planted field. This road was planted Sept 17

dogghr
10-14-2011, 06:23 PM
This is where the road enters into the field. On the right is the rye/clover mix that was planted Sept. 10. The deer have hit the rye plot as it grew

dogghr
10-14-2011, 06:30 PM
The bottom field planted with the same rye mix has done well and the deer have been on it almost from the beginning even tho it is the most exposed site.

criggster
10-14-2011, 08:09 PM
Looking good!! I'm sure you will be pleased once season rolls around. Your territory looks somewhat like mine. Due to the rocky nature of my fields I only spray and overseed, but get pretty good results.

Massey135
10-14-2011, 09:01 PM
looking really nice. You are apparently on the rainy side of the mountain. I planted my plots in late August and didn't get a drop for 5 weeks. Since the end of sept, we've been getting nice rain, but my plots are way behind yours. Hope you kill that big one!!

John Paul
10-15-2011, 07:15 AM
Absolutely beautiful piece of property you have there. Great plots and like stated before good luck putting that big boy on the ground.

rockinchair
10-15-2011, 05:34 PM
Looks good!

Can I ask what part of Monroe County you are from? I have family that live in the Sweet Springs area and I live right across the line in Bath County, VA.

dogghr
10-16-2011, 07:48 PM
looking really nice. You are apparently on the rainy side of the mountain. I planted my plots in late August and didn't get a drop for 5 weeks. Since the end of sept, we've been getting nice rain, but my plots are way behind yours. Hope you kill that big one!!

Thanks Criggster. After a hot, dry summer, we began to get biweekly rain beginning Sept. That certainly helped the growth of the new plots. Below is a 3 y.o. clover plot that was nothing but dirt at the end of Aug due to the heat and drought and overgrazing. I didn't think it would make it this year but it certainly recovered well.

dogghr
10-16-2011, 07:56 PM
Looks good!

Can I ask what part of Monroe County you are from? I have family that live in the Sweet Springs area and I live right across the line in Bath County, VA.

Thanks Rockinchair. My farm is near Rock Camp in Monroe County. I live in Mercer County about 40 min away. It is in sight of Peters Mnt. which is the same mountain by a different name that seperates the 2 of us on the VA border. Good luck on your season. I certainly ride my motorcycle thru Sweet Springs area regularly. It is a beautiful place, as is Bath County.

dogghr
10-16-2011, 08:12 PM
Absolutely beautiful piece of property you have there. Great plots and like stated before good luck putting that big boy on the ground.

Thanks John Paul, but as he's done for the 3 years I've chased him, the big boy has gone nocturnal and it is rare to get a pic of him except between 11- 2 am at night. He's very antisocial and even seems disinterested in women. Go figure. But I'm trying. He's consistantly pictured within 75 yards of 2 different stands and probably resides till dark in one of my sanctuaries.

dogghr
10-16-2011, 08:14 PM
Another night time pic

THE, LLC
10-16-2011, 08:16 PM
That's some pretty country and I've always heard WV has some really nice bucks---unusual for moutainous areas. However, I'd hate to shoot one up there because I know for a fact he'd find the steepest possible ravine to die in! :D

dogghr
10-16-2011, 08:22 PM
These boys and girls are discussing this weekends opening bow season for them. My stand sits directly behind them. I think they are eating some seed I spilled when I planted this road.

Scarecrow
10-17-2011, 07:28 AM
Great job on the plots. Good luck on bagging Big Boy.
Thanks for posting the pics.....I enjoyed.

Dan

dogghr
11-20-2011, 09:26 PM
I was hoping to get this one...

dogghr
11-20-2011, 09:29 PM
Or maybe this one.....

dogghr
11-20-2011, 09:30 PM
Or possibly one of these....

dogghr
11-20-2011, 09:32 PM
But instead took this boy. Not complaining mind you.

dogghr
11-20-2011, 09:34 PM
Came thru the inside corner scent checking a clover plot and trotted in on my doe bleat. Women... they will get you every time!

bigmike
11-20-2011, 09:49 PM
Good job! Now rifle comes into tomorrow!

buckhunter10
11-20-2011, 10:02 PM
Is west by god a two buck state?

dogghr
11-20-2011, 10:18 PM
Good job! Now rifle comes into tomorrow!

Thanks. Yes sir it does. Have my best ridge top stand waiting. Has not been hunted this year. Will probably take my muzzleloader if it is not raining too hard.

dogghr
11-20-2011, 10:24 PM
Is west by god a two buck state?

West 'By God' Virginia allows 3 deer w/ bow, one which has to be a doe and the other 2 can be buck or doe. Rifle season is 2 buck rule w/ concurrent doe season w/ up to 4 does legal depending on county. Muzzleloading is buck or doe, the legal number depends on the county. I believe the bowhunting only counties only allow 1 buck of the 3 legal and of course no rifle season is legal in these.

rocco
11-20-2011, 10:29 PM
is it just me, or does that great big freak nasty buck look very young? i'm no expert at aging, but he sure does seem to have long skinny legs?

outstanding looking habitat sir!

dogghr
11-20-2011, 10:35 PM
is it just me, or does that great big freak nasty buck look very young? i'm no expert at aging, but he sure does seem to have long skinny legs?

outstanding looking habitat sir!
You are right, he's never been a bulky deer. I have pics for 3 years on him so he is at least 3.5 to 4.5. He has always had and unbalanced rack, an 11 pointer last year. This is the first year I have ever gotten a daytime pic. They always have been dead of night. I do know that all the bucks leave the field when he enters.

dogghr
11-20-2011, 10:36 PM
That's why I named him 'Shaft', cause 'He's a baaad muther.... watch your mouth!"

bigmike
11-20-2011, 10:39 PM
good luck bagging that critter!

WV Huntaholic
11-29-2011, 11:41 PM
Did you ever get a crack at one of those big boys?

dgallow
11-30-2011, 12:51 AM
Is it just me or does anyone else view this place as a Leopold landscape candidate? Absolutely gorgeous place you have my friend! :D

dogghr
11-30-2011, 08:30 PM
Did you ever get a crack at one of those big boys?

*(&##^! NO!!!! The wide 10 came within 75 yards of my son on two occasions during bow season but never a shot opportunity. I had a shot at him at 200+ yards during rifle season which I would have taken but he was in line with the highway and a house on the other side, so I never even considered it. Honestly, he"s so close to being a 12 pt, that I kinda hope he survives the year but he better not give the option. As for that junked up 12 pt, he is on this earth to frustrate me. No one has ever seen him, even the surrounding properties. He only presents to pose for the cameras. Sometimes I think he is a ghost. I have his pattern down but cannot catch him during daytime. He is too smart and i m not smart enough. Now, where are my night vision goggles.... just kidding.

dogghr
11-30-2011, 08:39 PM
dgallow, thanks for the comment. Certainly posts by yourself and others on this site have helped tweak how I manage this property. Some of the information I knew, but these posts have added immensely to that basis. The main thing with deer and many other wildlife, is that they are creatures of edge, and the more edges we create, the happier everything is from mice, rabbits, to deer. Thank you for sharing your vast knowledge, it is greatly appreciated.

WV Huntaholic
11-30-2011, 11:04 PM
Hopefully, he will survive and be a twelve point next year. What did you think of the weather the first week of rifle? Thursday and Friday mornings were the only decent days I had. Lots of deer moved those mornings, but no big guys. The rest of the week was windy as hell or too hot. I didn't get to hunt this week, but there is always muzzleloader left. Good luck, if you hunt anymore this year.

dogghr
12-04-2011, 07:49 PM
The weather was not much a factor for me the first few days. Rain stayed just north until Tue evening, then it was a mess. Deer were not moving much. I saw a few nonshooters and does. Since we had met our doe goals already, i did not shoot. My son went north to the mountains to hunt, shot his buck within 15 minutes opening morning, and was already soaked. I feel harvest will be down due to poor weather in most of the state. I have my 10 pointers, a few 8 , and some yearlings on camera so survival has been good thus far, with muzzleloader season starting next week.

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:08 PM
While other posts were trying to figure ways to shoot their tresspassers or roaming dogs, I thought I would give a few quick updates on these plots. Again, they were done in abandoned cattle and hay fields that had not been cultivated. Sprayed w/ gly and tilled then seeded betrween 1st Aug and mid Sept. Here my son works on the bottom plot for rye mix.

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:12 PM
This is what the brassica plot looked like on Oct 14

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:14 PM
And here is how it appears on Nov 27

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:16 PM
The deer have browsed heavily since the first of Oct. We have had sub freezing temps almost nightly since mid Oct

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:18 PM
They have not touched the tuburs yet but have left behind some natural fertilizer.

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:21 PM
Well worn trails enter the plots

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:23 PM
The rye mix shows the red clover growing well, and still the AWP is browsed but healthy as they keep the rye trimmed down.

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:26 PM
With the freezing temps, the oats have begun to die off , leaving the rye, clover, and AWP.

dogghr
12-04-2011, 10:31 PM
But with all this available and surrounding farms with cut corn and alfalfa, the deer still love to hit the clover plots most. This one in the distance still remains quite healthy even with the cold temps. Clover trumps everything else in attracting the deer even when it looks terrible in the cold of January and in the heat/drought of August.

bigmike
12-04-2011, 10:34 PM
Very nice! How many acres do you have in food and how big is your place? Looks awesome!

dogghr
12-05-2011, 10:08 PM
I have about 100 ac. of land. There are about 4 acres planted in clover, rye mix , and brassicas. A few roads are seeded in a fall mix. When I first purchased this land nearly 4 years ago, camera pics that fall had a few spikes and forkhorns, and one 6 point. No mature deer at all. Now we have as many 8 pt or better bucks as we do does in our pics. All bucks are passed unless 8 pts and 15 inches width, and most of the time we have let those pass. It certainly has made a difference even though most hunters on surrounding land shoot anything. I also think the concurrent doe season during buck season allows many bucks to survive in this state since most hunters shoot whatever comes by first.

bigmike
12-05-2011, 10:39 PM
You have a nice property! I wish the VDGIF would make some changes. Maybe one day.

NH Mountains
12-06-2011, 01:19 AM
But with all this available and surrounding farms with cut corn and alfalfa, the deer still love to hit the clover plots most. This one in the distance still remains quite healthy even with the cold temps. Clover trumps everything else in attracting the deer even when it looks terrible in the cold of January and in the heat/drought of August. Is that a black dog in the photo or a bear?

Massey135
12-06-2011, 09:56 AM
Always look forward to seeing your photos - great job. I sure wish Virginia would run a doe season concurrent with buck. There is only one doe day in the national forest adjacent to my land. Which means, if those hunters want venison, it's going to be a small buck, most likely.

dogghr
12-06-2011, 08:27 PM
Is that a black dog in the photo or a bear?

LMAO. She thinks she's a bear. Just a "saved from the gas chamber" (dog pound} mixed breed. Certainly not afraid to take on anything that out weighs her by a 100 #. One of the best non hunting dogs I've ever owned. Always stays within sight and never complains. And to think some people on this site would rather have a 20 yo blonde that talks!

dogghr
01-08-2012, 05:55 PM
Don't mean to bore you guys with pics but since some seem to have deer not paying attention to brassicas, I thought I would share a few updates. Deer have always loved the brassicas here and usually hit them hard despite most my property having abundant red and white oak production. I don't think anyone plants brassicas for several square miles in this area since I always get a funny look when I talk of them. In addition, corn and alfalfa fields are nearby. This is my white clover plot. At the top of the hill is the rye/oats mix and adjacent to that is the brassica plot. In the distance is Peters Mnt with elevations of over 4000 feet.

dogghr
01-08-2012, 05:56 PM
These fields are adjacent to this 20 ac sanctuary on the property.

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:00 PM
Of course the brassicas on the right have been annilated and the rye/clover on left is still attractive. Notice how the edge of the two plots has been grazed to the ground. Deer, and most animals, love edge, whether it be types of plantings or different type of timber stands.

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:02 PM
This shows the edge between the plots

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:05 PM
Obviously the deer love the tuburs. Indeed these provide a really nice snack in the dead of winter when not much is left but woody browse.

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:10 PM
This a white clover plot in an adjacent ravine. It is here that I get most of the mature buck pics after hunting season begins. Clover is always the ace of spades in this area. They feed on it when it appears nothing much is left for 12 months of the year. I always overseed my clover in the fall w/ light broadcast of rye. This gives the deer a little extra and certainly helps w/ weed control come spring and summer.

buckhunter10
01-08-2012, 06:11 PM
I love your property! It is beautiful!

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:12 PM
My camera popup blind sits to the right of this field. If you can see it!

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:15 PM
A man made scrape sits just inside the entrance of this field and there is not a buck that goes into this field that does not hit the scrape year round.

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:17 PM
Such as this poser that survived the season. So far I have pics of 8 mature bucks since Jan 1 that managed to survived.

dogghr
01-08-2012, 06:21 PM
Even though the season ended Jan 1, my climber still beckons me to take one last sit. I really don't care for this stand, but it is a fun one to sit in occassionally. I prefer another stand 100 yds further up the ridge near the 20 ac sanctuary I showed earlier. I have another santuary of about 10 ac and another smaller one adjacent to this field of about 3 ac.

dgallow
01-09-2012, 12:59 PM
Obviously the deer love the tuburs. Indeed these provide a really nice snack in the dead of winter when not much is left but woody browse.

Was the whole turnip plot overseeded in rye or rye planted with them? Or is that pic on the edge of the two plots?

I'd worry about erosion on that slope...oats can be drilled into that late winter and help keep living roots in the soil before heavy spring rains set in.

Very nice property and thanks for taking the time to share! :)

dogghr
01-09-2012, 09:35 PM
I love your property! It is beautiful!

Thanks. I kinda like it too. Keeps me from getting too much belly! LOL

dogghr
01-09-2012, 09:42 PM
Was the whole turnip plot overseeded in rye or rye planted with them? Or is that pic on the edge of the two plots?

I'd worry about erosion on that slope...oats can be drilled into that late winter and help keep living roots in the soil before heavy spring rains set in.

Very nice property and thanks for taking the time to share! :)

Sorry, that wasn't shown very well. I think my mind was still buzzing from the WVU Orange Crush!!! Wait! Did I just slip that into a plotting post? Maybe. Anyways, here is an earlier pic. The right side was seeded brassicas and the left was rye/clover mix. I agree with your comment of bare soil left in the brassica plot and was planning on planting clover/oats late winter. I was surprised they mowed it so completely down.

dogghr
01-09-2012, 09:45 PM
Now here is another view again as it appears now. This is looking east with the brasscas to the right where the exclusion cage sits, and the rye/oats/AWP/clover mix to the left. Thanks for the suggestion.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 08:35 PM
Just a quick update on last years planting. After a very dry winter, we have had at least an inch of rain every 2 weeks since March. While this may be good, it has kept any weekenders from getting anything done. In addition, with the rain and mild winter, my clover plots have more weeds than ever. I finally was able to do some mowing and at last planted my expired brassica plot. Since the winter was mild, about 30 % of the turnips remained, so they were tilled undeer and seeded w/ oats and red clover I had on hand. The deer love the brassicas but it really bugs me to have bare soil exposed to erosion for such a period of time. These hill top plots do well but soil is definately at a premium requiring fert and lime to make productive. With bare soil I feel as if most my effort is washing away at times. But I do plan to plant them again regardless.

welder1
05-31-2012, 08:43 PM
I frost seeded a spent brassica plot with red and white clover in Feb. on our farm in KY. and got outstanding results. That may be an option for you next winter. You have to hit it early while the ground is still spewed up with frost in the morning.

WTNUT
05-31-2012, 08:45 PM
Flat ground is over rated. ;) Sure is some pretty county.

Don't let him kid you. By WV that is flat ground. I have spent enought time there to know that ha ha

dogghr
05-31-2012, 08:46 PM
I always leave my rye plots intact thru the summer. The does love fawning in the thick growth and fawns bed there thru the summer. I have to be very careful when mowing later when ready for crop rotation because the deer will stay bedded until I am nearly on them. The growth is about 6 feet tall at this stage with oats and clover growing beneath.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 08:49 PM
Another view of the rye thicket.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 08:52 PM
And the clover grows thick. I don't need this clover too much for feed since my other white clover plots handle most the browse pressure.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 08:56 PM
A few other creatures love this thick jungle also, such as this black snake, thus the saying " like a snake in the grass".

dogghr
05-31-2012, 09:03 PM
I was surprised how will the clover grew on this logging road. It was broadcast on top of soil with rye and oats last fall. My son's tree stand sits on the upper right edge. This road is about 200 yds from a 4 year old white clover plot. He watched 5 shooter bucks parade around him on two occasions last fall as they chased does.. He just enjoyed the show and passed on any shots. He's more of a mature hunter than I was at that age for sure.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 09:04 PM
This road had more heavy rye growth even tho there is clover in there.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 09:07 PM
And a final shot of the bottom rye plot. Again, this is also allowed to grow until time to till under. For some reason the bear like bedding in this one. Now that makes you clean your colon on a surprise jump.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 09:13 PM
Don't let him kid you. By WV that is flat ground. I have spent enought time there to know that ha ha
I do agree with you. That is why we have one leg shorter than the other, walking side hill so much in this state. Seriously, I love my tiller, but you have to be very careful using it going down a slope, because it will suddenly start shoving the tractor forward and it will not stop until you lift the tiller. Certainly will wake you up fast and makes you stop to clean out your pants.

dogghr
05-31-2012, 09:16 PM
I frost seeded a spent brassica plot with red and white clover in Feb. on our farm in KY. and got outstanding results. That may be an option for you next winter. You have to hit it early while the ground is still spewed up with frost in the morning.

Yea that was my plan this year but since there were so many brassicas remaining, I feared them reseeding too much to control for next rotation and chose to till them under.

dogghr
06-05-2012, 08:25 PM
The deer seem to like this clover planted logging road.

Scarecrow
06-06-2012, 07:57 AM
Great post..........great pics. Thanks for posting. Beautiful ground and ur definately making it better. Time well spent. I spent a couple weeks over the past few years archery hunting in southern WV.....the 4 county archery only area........taint NO flat land down there :D

dgallow
06-06-2012, 12:53 PM
The History channel aired a 3 part series on the Hatfields and McCoys....an interesting drama.

Don't know where it was filmed, but thought it a fair rpresentation of your area!

So, are you a Hatfield or a McCoy? :D

wv-outdoor
06-06-2012, 05:13 PM
Thats some nice growth on the buck. Your farm is an inspiration to me. I'd love to try and do some of the same things. Hard to persuade my father though. Since he's the person in charge of it.
Dgallow: I thought I read somewhere that it was filmed in another country. I didnt see the miniseries so Im going by the article.

dogghr
06-06-2012, 07:32 PM
Dgallow, evidently the Hatfield series was filmed in Romania of all places. Supposedly for a couple of reasons. It is undeveloped in many regions and to help their economy, it was very inexpensive to film there. Go figure. As for which I am? As with any fight, the smart ones will lay back till the idiots kill themselves off, then move in to reap their women and spoils.

dogghr
06-06-2012, 07:38 PM
Thats some nice growth on the buck. Your farm is an inspiration to me. I'd love to try and do some of the same things. Hard to persuade my father though. Since he's the person in charge of it.
Dgallow: I thought I read somewhere that it was filmed in another country. I didnt see the miniseries so Im going by the article.

I understand your delema. Why not try just clearing some small areas from the leaves this Sept and broadcast clover and rye with some lime and fertilizer before a rain, and watch it grow. You will be amazed how much you will enjoy the fruits of your labor of even a small area or road. Good luck.

wv-outdoor
06-06-2012, 09:00 PM
I'm getting the necessary equipment together for my atv to plant lickcreek's mix at the house for viewing, trail cam pictures, and just feeding the deer as a way to show the effectiveness of food plots. Hopefully it will help demonstrate it due to the fact that we cant hunt around the house. I have an area on the farm where I do plan to plant something but its the only spot. Everything is mature woods with not much cover or browse. Lots of work needs done but thats a whole other story.

dogghr
06-20-2012, 09:09 PM
A couple of bear cruising the clover planted farm road.

dogghr
06-20-2012, 09:10 PM
And another.

dogghr
06-20-2012, 09:11 PM
And finally.

wv-outdoor
06-20-2012, 10:50 PM
nice pictures.. even they like the improvements you've made to the place.. :p

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:05 PM
One need not think they must have huge fields to attract deer. You only really need them to present themselves during legal hours to have a good hunting tract. Even a small area or road may be more than enough to draw a deer's attention, especially if it is near a edge created by changes in growth structure or topography. Deer love these transition zones and it may be barely apparant to us. Just the junction of conifers and hardwoods creates this edge. A planted small plot in addition to a natural forest edge and perhaps an edge associated with the topography will indeed present more deer than a homogeanous landscape. So even with limited funds or equipment, or manpower, you can often create your own little sweet spot. Don't be afraid to try.

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:08 PM
This is just last falls planting of some clover, peas, and rye. The clover has actually done better here than in my fields due to our dry summer.

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:10 PM
This does sit near a hardwood/conifer edge and also in the background is a steep drop to a clover field.

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:14 PM
The deer feel comfortable here even in daylight as they transition from bedding to feeding areas, following various edges. And also other game is attracted to these small secluded sites.

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:18 PM
And of course a black patroller. Our land should be a vital place for many creatures, both great and small , if we are to have a productive landscape.

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:22 PM
But of course, to most of us, tweaking the land for our most desired quarry, the almighty whitetail, brings us the ultimate satisfaction.

dogghr
07-22-2012, 07:25 PM
Because this is why we lay awake at night planning our land management and hunts.

buckhunter10
07-24-2012, 05:59 PM
great pics as always!

buckvelvet
07-25-2012, 11:16 AM
Yeah this thread has some breathtaking landscape, nice job as always!

Zuke
07-25-2012, 05:16 PM
dogghr, somehow I had missed this site but glad I saw it and went through all the posts. Great looking place. Do you have any pics of your forested ground? Would like to see to compare with So. Il forests.

Zuke
07-25-2012, 05:19 PM
dogghr, left out a question. How often do you see the bears when you are out and do you have a good population of them?

dogghr
07-25-2012, 09:04 PM
Zuke, Usually if I see a bear it is moving fast to get away from me. You never see them when you expect to and it usually scares the crap out of you. I've got pics of about 6 different bears. One very large and old boar and several sows with cubs and another large one not sure of sex. They are $%# on apple trees and can tear up a tree stand just for fun. Lucky have never had a camera tore up but they have knocked them about, ruining several weeks of pics if i don't check them regularly. Oddly they have never touched a pop up blind. I have several very interesting pics of bears I will try to dig up, one with a deer feeding 10 feet from a huge boar bear and another of two cubs sliding down a hill while mom looks on. I consider them a nuisance but interesting at the same time. I seldom go to my stand in the complete dark anymore. Yea, I'm a wimp.

buckhunter10
07-25-2012, 09:12 PM
Zuke, Usually if I see a bear it is moving fast to get away from me. You never see them when you expect to and it usually scares the crap out of you. I've got pics of about 6 different bears. One very large and old boar and several sows with cubs and another large one not sure of sex. They are $%# on apple trees and can tear up a tree stand just for fun. Lucky have never had a camera tore up but they have knocked them about, ruining several weeks of pics if i don't check them regularly. Oddly they have never touched a pop up blind. I have several very interesting pics of bears I will try to dig up, one with a deer feeding 10 feet from a huge boar bear and another of two cubs sliding down a hill while mom looks on. I consider them a nuisance but interesting at the same time. I seldom go to my stand in the complete dark anymore. Yea, I'm a wimp.

cant you hunt them in WV? I got them on my place in Ohio about every two weeks now, as well as bobcats.

dogghr
07-25-2012, 09:31 PM
Yes , there are legal seasons. Record kills in recent years. No baiting allowed. You can use dogs in certain areas. Across the highway from me, dogs are legal but not on my side of road.

dogghr
08-12-2012, 07:58 PM
Took a while to find the bear pics I promised. These I think are some of the more unique ones of 100's that I have.

dogghr
08-12-2012, 08:00 PM
This is why I no longer use corn for my camera surveys. They will eat until they puke.

dogghr
08-12-2012, 08:01 PM
Feeders? Never have put one up in any way that a bear didn't figure out how to take it out.

dogghr
08-12-2012, 08:12 PM
This fellow was a big boar I believe. When he walked in, all others left.

dogghr
08-12-2012, 08:13 PM
And in no hurry to go anywhere.

dogghr
08-12-2012, 08:15 PM
I was shocked to see this pic with the deer passing within 10 yards as if the bear did not exist.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 07:39 PM
Checked on my brasica plots today. Didn't expect much since there has been no rain but for a few showers. These were planted July 28th in last years rye/clover combo.

I only show these to reinforce what LC is constantly preaching. The man knows his s***! These have grown faster in part for the N fixing from the previous crop but more likely from the moisture that the WR holds in the ground as LC has shown. It has been DRY.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 07:41 PM
I do have residual rye growing that I might spray. This has been a busy year for me and I have taken a lot of short cuts on my plots. And paid the price a little.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 07:46 PM
This may not look like much moisture an inch deep, but the adjacent plot of last years brassicas that was spring seeded to oats and red clover has not moisture no matter how deep you dig. Again, moisture contributed and held by the WR.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 07:49 PM
In the distance in this bottom , another brassica plot planted the same way and showing the same results.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 07:51 PM
In the distance, the lower plot form the bottom road. The area adjacent to it will be planted again in rye/clover mix.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 07:57 PM
Don't these deer realize that my clover plots suck? Between me not having time to maintain them this year and the dry weather, the weeds and grasses have had their way.

dogghr
08-25-2012, 08:00 PM
But if they don't care , then I guess neither should I.

buckfever37
08-25-2012, 09:58 PM
Checked on my brasica plots today. Didn't expect much since there has been no rain but for a few showers. These were planted July 28th in last years rye/clover combo.

I only show these to reinforce what LC is constantly preaching. The man knows his s***! These have grown faster in part for the N fixing from the previous crop but more likely from the moisture that the WR holds in the ground as LC has shown. It has been DRY.


















Looks great!

Just curious did you spray the rye and clover before planting those brassicas? Or did you just drive over it and knock it down and broadcast your seed into the chaff?

RJ in LA
08-26-2012, 07:53 AM
Everything looks great. It's funny that the bear will lay down in the corn pile like that. Down here the hogs will do the same thing. That is why I also don't put out corn for camera surveys anymore.

Thayer.qdma
08-26-2012, 11:43 AM
But if they don't care , then I guess neither should I.


What would you age these three bucks at???

dogghr
08-26-2012, 06:47 PM
Looks great!

Just curious did you spray the rye and clover before planting those brassicas? Or did you just drive over it and knock it down and broadcast your seed into the chaff?

I have in the past broad cast seed into simply a mowed plot with decent results if done before a rain. But no doubt planting into prepared soil gives much better results.

This field was first mowed short and then worked with a rototiller, working in the fertilizer before the seed was broadcast. I seeded too heavily because it had been so dry I felt I would get poor germination and in addition some of my seed was nearly 4 years old. But obviously brassica seed will germinate on a sidewalk I think.

dogghr
08-26-2012, 06:53 PM
I don't think one has to use a cultipacker, but since I started using one, my germination rate has greatly improved. It makes for a very uniform soil bed. And yes mine is standing on edge in the distance thanks to the hook on the chain, which I use to connect to the tiller, breaking a 3rd time while doing this plot. Thats what I get for not taking a spare. I was not happy!

dogghr
08-26-2012, 06:57 PM
What would you age these three bucks at???

I 'm sure the one on the left is a 1.5 yo. The right one is definately at least 4.5 , since I've followed him for several years.

The middle one probably 3.5-4.5. I've not figured out yet which buck he is from past pics. I've got and idea but just haven't seen enough angles yet to verify.

Massey135
08-26-2012, 08:40 PM
I think that middle buck is past prime. 7+ years old. He looks worn out.

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:09 PM
Checked to see if any germination and growth had occurred since planting one week ago. This is the bottom plot. Second year in planting

Notice the natural thatch which helps in this dry weather. Despite promises, we received no rain until yesterday and it was only a few showers.

The clover has begun to show...

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:10 PM
Rye is barely starting...

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:11 PM
If you dig down an inch, the soil has remained moist enough to clump together in your hand

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:14 PM
The brassicas continue to thrive as usual after 1 month. No chance to follow after 30 days with urea this year, and I doubt I will.

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:16 PM
These bottom plots sit just past the tree to the left above this spring fed , cattail choked pond. Even in the driest years, this pond stays nearly full.

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:18 PM
The upper field plots sit on the ridge in the distance. Brassicas have done well , but even less growth of rye plot on this dry ridge.

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:20 PM
From my trail cameras, it appears velvet came off bucks about mid week. And a small rub marks the start of the fun.

dogghr
09-04-2012, 08:26 PM
As I checked my cameras, these beech nuts were falling like crazy. Leaves were dropping as if it was October. I had pics of bucks stuffing themselves on these nuts. I think fall will be 2 weeks early in this area.

flinginairos
09-04-2012, 09:43 PM
Great pics!! Being a fellow WV native I have been admiring your hard work! The deer in my area have seemed to disappear. I think the weekend storms turned a bunch of acorns loose and they are busy eating them up;) I found a rub on saturday as well and thought it was a little early. You are right though, seems like an early fall coming. This is my first year plotting and I have a nice 1/2 acre plot of brassicas. I am not sure how the deer are going to react to them just yet. No signs of browsing when I checked tonight. Keep the updates coming!!:)

Massey135
09-05-2012, 01:18 PM
I think that beech nut looks an awful lot like a chestnut oak akern:)

dgallow
09-05-2012, 01:27 PM
Notice the natural thatch which helps in this dry weather. Despite promises, we received no rain until yesterday and it was only a few showers.

The clover has begun to show...

Soil cover is everything in dry conditions! I suspect it will pay in spades on your dry ridge. We are about 50:50 on velvet casting...a sign of improving herd health.

VEry nice pictures and property! :)

NH Mountains
09-05-2012, 01:33 PM
I think that beech nut looks an awful lot like a chestnut oak akern:)

X2. It doesn't look like any beechnut I've ever seen.

Beautiful property. You've done well.

dogghr
09-05-2012, 02:23 PM
Then a chestnut oak nut it shall be. But I did think they had a small cap. And this area has several beech trees. But certainly not my expertise. Thanks

Massey135
09-05-2012, 02:31 PM
They're after the chestnut oak on my place, too. Did my annual early september sit in the woods last weekend listening for falling acorns. Only chestnut and red oak falling at my place right now, so I'll bet your in the same boat. As usual, your property looks great. Such a beautiful place. Keep them pics a'comin!!

dogghr
09-10-2012, 08:10 PM
This is the kind of pic you get when a bear is messing with your camera. Luckily he left it and it fell back into place. Lucky.

dogghr
09-10-2012, 08:12 PM
Don't these guys realize my 20 Ac sanctuary is to the left. Fair game here.

dogghr
09-10-2012, 08:13 PM
Have a stand just to the left of this which I usually will not hunt until Nov.

dogghr
09-10-2012, 08:15 PM
Notice the 10 pt to the right is dead asleep He stays asleep for nearly and hour until another 10 pt comes up the hill.

dogghr
09-10-2012, 08:19 PM
And I'm sure I shall bump into my little buddy in the dark one morning. Bears may not sh** in the woods , but I sure can.

dogghr
09-10-2012, 08:23 PM
Aren't they cute? NO!!!!!!

John Paul
09-10-2012, 09:31 PM
Aren't they cute? NO!!!!!!

I know how destructive they are, cute they are, friendly to property they are not.:(

wv-outdoor
09-12-2012, 12:23 PM
Excellent posts. Been awhile since I've been on here and I love reading your posts.

I'm suprised the bears haven't destroyed your cams. I have all mine in security boxes and still have them do damage. You must be lucky. Best of luck this upcoming season.

buckvelvet
09-12-2012, 05:00 PM
Man your stuff is just awesome, the scenery your place has is cool as heck. Love the plot pics as always never stop this thread!

letemgrow
09-12-2012, 05:10 PM
Don't these deer realize that my clover plots suck? Between me not having time to maintain them this year and the dry weather, the weeds and grasses have had their way.

Some of those weeds may be the main attraction.

What scenery you have there on your farm!!

dogghr
09-15-2012, 09:05 PM
[QUOTE=letemgrow;529831]Some of those weeds may be the main attraction

I agree . I don't loose too much sleep about the weeds, mainly just keep them mowed back. But the grasses have got a little carried away this year due to my neglect. I'll be back on them next year.

dogghr
09-15-2012, 09:08 PM
Excellent posts. Been awhile since I've been on here and I love reading your posts.

I'm suprised the bears haven't destroyed yours cams. I have all mine in security boxes and still have them do damage. You must be lucky. Best of luck this upcoming season.

You are are smart. I used to keep them in boxes but as I have collected more cameras, I have gotten lazy about that. I have been lucky.

dogghr
10-01-2012, 08:50 PM
Weird weather this year. Long dry spells followed by decent rains, then another long dry period. These were planted July 28th in very dry conditions in last years rye combo plot. Virtually no rain in July or Aug.

dogghr
10-01-2012, 08:52 PM
The rye mix planted this year on Aug 26 is in the foreground, with the brassicas in the back. Again, alternated strips from last year. Had decent rains twice in Sept

dogghr
10-01-2012, 08:55 PM
Very heavy mast crop this year of any nut you can imagine and they are being hit hard by many game animals.

dogghr
10-01-2012, 08:59 PM
As always , the deer hammer my clover. I really sometimes think I should plant only clover. But that would be boring. If this button buck nursed much longer he may get to mate his own mother. And no WV jokes please. LOL. Probably last years yearling mated late and birthed this fawn late.

dogghr
10-01-2012, 09:04 PM
I honestly thought this old clover plot was toast this year with such dry weather. But I felt the deer were just keeping it browsed down due to poor browse present due to dry weather. I seldom still use cages, but I stuck this one back up, and indeed, the deer were grazing it 4 inches shorter than was in the cage. The recent rains has brought it back to life and it now stands 9 in deep after being nothing much more than dirt in July.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 07:55 PM
After several frosts mid Sept and freezes in Oct, the deer are hard in the brassicas. There is a above average mast available, yet I watched deer parade without pause into this plot.

They waded belly deep, not even bending down, and mowed the leaves like a mower.

No doubt, the planting in a rye combo plot, as LC has shown, def allowed much better growth despite a very dry year. I was able to fertilize less , with better results.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 07:57 PM
I did have some areas of infestation. Not sure what its cause but would suspect some insect even though I could find no evidence.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 07:58 PM
Most of this, and the bottom plot did quite well however.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:01 PM
The rye combo doing well as usual, even though the AWP is slow to erupt. Again, this is on very dry soils, but we have had good rains this fall.

The deer hit it also, but the brassicas are preferred right now.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:02 PM
The rye combo is to the left, with the brassicas to the right. Of course rotated from last year, as was the bottom plots.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:04 PM
As I've shown before, you don't need to do a large plot to attract deer.
This road was done Sept 15 before a rain.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:06 PM
And 2 weeks later this is what you have. Deer love these spots.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:08 PM
Deer hit these road plantings morning, evening , and middle of night.

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:11 PM
Of all ages......

dogghr
10-15-2012, 08:13 PM
And of course, my special friends. Does this fur make my *** look big? Date is wrong on camera, these are this years pics.

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:20 PM
Ok , so I'm sitting here bored while Hurricane Sandy gives us 1-2 feet of snow. Soooo, I thought I'd throw on some mundane pics. If the 40-50 mph winds would subside, I could maybe go hunt some.

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:23 PM
I planted another brassica plot in the bottom this year to hopefully take some of the pressure off the top field. They have been feeding heavily on both even with heavy acorn crop.

In the distance you can see the brassicas. The deer don't like this plot nearly as well since it is not nearly as secluded.

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:27 PM
Last week I picked a few small turnips for a friend to cook up. I don't like them but the deer love them from Oct to Feb. It amazes me how fast these things grow, even in a very hot , dry year. I cut back fertilizers in half since I was planting in previous rye plot. And they did better than ever.

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:31 PM
The bucks still love the hidden clover plot though and show here before heading to the others.

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:33 PM
And the up and comers.

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:36 PM
This weekend should be a good hunt. I always have very good luck after a rain/snow, windy weather event. Hope to sit this or another stand saved for these next 2 weeks.

That is if the tree has not blown down!

dogghr
10-30-2012, 02:48 PM
My buddy did shoot a small bear this past week. Weighed about 118. Shot with a Rage and went 20 yards. One down and hopefully a couple more to go.

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:32 PM
As usual, the deer have fed hard on the brassicas and the adjoining rye plots. The bottom plot has helped with the pressure and they seem to be lasting longer this year. They have really hit the oats/rye especially in the bottom where it is mowed almost to the ground already.

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:36 PM
The brassicas were planted July 28 during very dry summer. It was fert w/ 300#/ac of 19-19-19 and 100# urea. Stayed dry until end of Aug and then weelkly showers occured. The rye combo done Aug 26 w/ 100# 19-19-19 and 50# urea.

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:41 PM
It is cool to provide for a variety of animals. The turkey feed here as much as anything as do the bobcat, bear, and yes the coyote. As I walked into this field this past weekend , one of my resident red tail hawk buzzed me as if to say I'll be leaving for the south soon, see you in the spring. One of these hawks pinned a huge fox squirrel in front of me one day and just sat there looking at me as if to say, " this is how you do it fool"!

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:44 PM
I used to always take my does early in the season. I feel differently now in this age of heavy bear and coyote predation. Perhaps it isn't so , but I feel that the longer a fawn can spend learning from it s mother, maybe the greater the survival rate of that deer. Just my thought.

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:46 PM
So maybe that fawn can learn where to hide, and where the good food is, and where to stay away from.

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:47 PM
And when these nasty long cold days of winter come, they will know how best to survive these days.

dogghr
11-05-2012, 09:50 PM
Then perhaps survive enough years to provide one of these that can enhance our sit on the stand. All because mama taught him well.

wv-outdoor
11-19-2012, 09:12 PM
Looks as though things are going well for you. Plots look great and the trail cam pics are awesome. Best of luck!!

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:24 PM
Another little update. As most of the country, we have had a dry, allbeit, not as dry as a lot of the country, year.

Well , since brassicas are so well liked here, I planted a second plot with them. It did help with the browsing, but they still mowed them down. There was a heavy acorn crop, yet I watched deer parade into all my plots each evening, literally crunching the acorns underfoot as they went for the clover, and brassicas, and AWP, and oats, and of course the rye.

These are the fields on Nov 4....The brassicas

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:25 PM
And the rye/clover mix....

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:27 PM
By Dec 24, this is the results of my hungry deer. Picky? I don't think so.

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:29 PM
Pretty hungry, My lawn mower doesn't mow this even. The brassicas of course on the right and the rye mix on the left.

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:32 PM
Yet even in January , there is still some to eat besides the clover.

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:43 PM
In addition, as I always do in Jan and Feb, I did some hinge cutting this past weekend to thicken transition zones and to put some fresh browse on the ground in easy reach of the deer.

I tend to be over zealous about prevention and here you see what I always wear, in addition to steel toed boots ,when using the chainsaw. Maybe some of you have plenty of sick days but if I don't show up for work, I don't make money. A measely $300 safety is cheaper than the hospital or missed days. You should never cut alone either , even though I admit that I usually do except for my dog. Hopefully she can go get help if I screw up. Yea I know....

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:47 PM
Here I am providing browse, making bedding area, and blocking trails. All by cutting just a few trees.

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:50 PM
This shows edge of my largest sanctuary where I have hinge cut for 4 years. Some of this is my doing, some is natures, but I do know my mature bucks pass along these thickened areas which must make them feel safer.

dogghr
01-14-2013, 08:59 PM
These hinge cut trees make sucker branches which thickens the area and provides easy food for the deer during the harshest months of the year.

Even though I show these, I really wish most people would not hinge cut. It can be a dangerous act, and even the smallest of trees can suddenly do some strange rolling and bucking which can certainly catch a person off guard. I speak from experience and have used a chainsaw most my life. Two of my best friends run logging operations, both for 2 generations now, and their stories can sure scare the crap out of you. I have had 2 friends who have laid open their legs with these saws and a third that had a tree kick back on top of him.

So I'm just saying, be very careful and take your precautions.

Here you can see how the suckers grow out from the stump....

dogghr
01-14-2013, 09:00 PM
And if you look closely, how the deer have browsed the tips of these suckers during the winter and spring.

Massey135
01-15-2013, 08:50 AM
Always look forward to another installment of "foodplotting in the mountains" Nice work.

luvkansas
01-15-2013, 10:42 AM
Just had a chance to review your posts and wow im impressed. I to plant in mountain property in the Allegany Mountains in North West PA. You have beautiful place there and great job with your habitat work! I need to start posting some pix for you folks as well. Its nice to see others hard work pay off. Great job!

dogghr
01-16-2013, 11:54 AM
Always look forward to another installment of "foodplotting in the mountains" Nice work.

Thanks Massey. The feeling is mutual with your posts.

dogghr
01-16-2013, 11:59 AM
Just had a chance to review your posts and wow im impressed. I to plant in mountain property in the Allegany Mountains in North West PA. You have beautiful place there and great job with your habitat work! I need to start posting some pix for you folks as well. Its nice to see others hard work pay off. Great job!

Appreciate that Luvkansas. You should indeed post some pics. Each area of the country is a little different and its always nice to see those in like areas and how their results are.

I have a good friend in Dubois and his opinion about deer management is just the opposite of mine. Would rather shoot any kind of buck and never a doe. He hates the AP restrictions in PA. Everyone is entitled to their opinion I guess. Great hunter, just not selective.

luvkansas
01-16-2013, 06:24 PM
Thats to bad but i guess everyone is intitled to hunt and manage as they fit. I am not to far from him. My property is located just north of Port Allegany. I will make it a point to start posting pix this year to share with you all. My biggest problem is I live 4 hours from the property so when I do get there I am going 100 mph from the time I get there til I leave. We have made some great strides and are seeing a few mature bucks every year with some being very respectfull for that part of the country. I have a mix of differant plantings as you do. Like to read LC posts and have gotten some great info from there. This will be the first year I will be planting the Rye grain mix of his. I will doing strips and rotating as you are. We have some very nice clover plots and plant LC'S turnip mix and have also been planting beans. Going to take some of the bean ground and add the Rye mix into the program.

sixpack1975
02-19-2013, 05:21 PM
Thanks for the encouragement..... Your property is absolutely gorgeous judging from the pictures. Keep up the good work!

I'm from east central Pa and also get a laugh out of seeing "Joe Blow" plant his 30 acres of food plots on flat, fertile land. We have roughly 300 feet of elevation change across our 200 acres and are forced to plot where we can fit it, and are forced to adapt our hunting around it. We made an honest effort to lay things out the best we could, but ultimately the terrain here has the final say! It took us 3 years to get 6 acres of plots cleared from the timber, with another two being cleared this winter along with TSI work, and we are still working on building the soils, which has become much more economical and less time consuming thanks to some great posts on this forum. (Thanks LC!) My goal is to carve out about 12- 15 acres by the end of the project. Not ag-country by far, we have high deer numbers which hurts us (or our "crops" actually), and the terrain can really impede ones progress but I'm beginning to love the land management more than the hunting! I'll try to get some pics up of our work here also this spring and maybe we can start a "land management for ridge runners" section LOL!

Keep it going.... Looks great!

dogghr
02-24-2013, 06:40 PM
Thanks six-pack. I feel your pain. It is tricky to plot in mountainous land but a huge advantage/disadvantage we have, is the thousands of acres of every kind of oak tree imaginable. This is a blessing since we seldom have to plant oaks and worry about acorn producers, yet a curse because if there is a great acorn crop, deer are scattered everywhere.

Our soil can be pretty acidic requiring large amounts of lime. K and P can be high or low depending on the area. Also our plots are often smaller due to lack of flat land, and these are hit hard by our large deer numbers. Luckily, in my area, deer numbers have been reduced by congruent buck/doe seasons, hard winters in 09 and 10, and heavy coyote/bear fawn predation.

Having a central feeding plot can be impossible due to the topography, but that can be circumvented by designing your plots to have a "flow" in their connections, that allow deer, especially the bucks to travel in a predictable pattern while scent checking the food plots and doe bedding areas.

Keep up your efforts and they will pay off. Good luck, and if your username refers to a beverage then come on down and we'll talk some more over a six-pack. If it refers to muscles, then I can't help you there.

sixpack1975
02-25-2013, 10:02 AM
[QUOTE]Having a central feeding plot can be impossible due to the topography, but that can be circumvented by designing your plots to have a "flow" in their connections, that allow deer, especially the bucks to travel in a predictable pattern while scent checking the food plots and doe bedding areas.
We found out real quick that this can be a very effective strategy. Most of our plots have been "connected" through TSI work, creating cover strips that join plots together with hopes of giving the deer a safety corridor to travel. Couple the cover strips with the fact that we tried to locate them on already preferred travel corridors (i.e. saddles, sideslopes and benches) and they have no reason not to use them. The plots range anywhere from 150 to 300 yards apart and these little man made funnels seem to work quite well. We gave them a edge to travel (and me a edge to hunt) by heavily cutting 50 to 80 yard wide swaths and leaving some untouched timber strips to hunt from.
Keep up your efforts and they will pay off. Good luck, and if your username refers to a beverage then come on down and we'll talk some more over a six-pack. If it refers to muscles, then I can't help you there
LOL.... it's the beverage referral. We're from Yuengling country. My wife would probably rather it be due to me having "Magic Mike" like abs but that's not happening now is it hahahah.

dogghr
02-25-2013, 08:44 PM
Oh, but the days are getting longer and time slips so quickly that soon the snow will be gone and the heat of summer will be on us.

dogghr
02-25-2013, 08:47 PM
Just as this spider prepares its web, we too must begin our planning to attract that deer we so much want.

dogghr
02-25-2013, 08:51 PM
And before we know, once again we make this trek to our stands. Get ready. It will be here soon.

dogghr
02-25-2013, 08:53 PM
But for now, the deer fight to survive. Freezing temperatures, snow, cold rains, and fatigue are there enemies.

dogghr
02-25-2013, 09:01 PM
But if we have done our jobs, they have had a fall feeding of nutrious browse, have protected areas in which to hide and bed, and hopefully still some winter worn crops left to provide food. They as always dig thru the snow to get those remaining morsels of clover that to my eye hardly even exists.

dogghr
02-25-2013, 09:06 PM
They literally bury their face into the snow to get this valuable feed. Summer crops have their purpose. But it is the fall and the depths of winter, when these deer will benefit the most from what we do to our land. And maybe with a little luck , these deer can grow to be part of the mature herd we strive to obtain.

wv-outdoor
03-06-2013, 09:53 PM
Love your posts and nice pictures!! I'm actually going to go out to the farm to frost seed the new right of way that was installed last summer. Right now it has a mixture of clovers and winter rye judging by the plants. They never did tell us exactly what is was except for a Deer blend. I think by adding the white and red clover that it should be decent this year. I know from trail cam pics that they loved whatever it was they planted. Will also have to spread some lime and fertilizer later this spring.

dogghr
03-08-2013, 07:10 PM
Yea they plant ROWs in a lot of deer blends anymore. Even the high transmission ROWs by AEP in this area are initially planted in clover mixes and /or brassicas. However these are not maintained after the line is placed and I suspect their future spraying to kill foliage growth around their towers probably kill most of it anyway.

dogghr
03-08-2013, 07:20 PM
I've seen many on this site asking how to do plots with limited equipment and resources. You have seen me post how just simple road plantings work quite well in attracting wildlife and can be done with minimal cost and equipment.

I did go back in time and pull some pics of my initial plots done when I first purchased the land. I did't take a lot of pics then unfortunately but here goes.

This farm was part of a larger tract that had been in a family for at least 4 generations. It was mainly a cattle and sometimes sheep farm. Some tobacco was also grown in one section. As you can see, it was beautiful hay fields, very thick and healthy fescue.

dogghr
03-08-2013, 07:30 PM
I think to much worry is put into the existing seed bank. I did soil tests and limed accordingly. I never sprayed these to kill the grasses. I simply hired a local farmer for a couple hundred dollars and had him plow and disc two, 1 ac fields. I did have him turn the soil under when he plowed. You can either turn up or under as you plow, and I feel that turning under gives more kill of the grasses and weeds. This was done in August.

In Sept, I fertilized according to soil tests. Then just simply dragged a bed spring with my ATV until it was relatively smooth.

I then planted a white clove mix and added wheat as a grain. This is what I had done in past plantings and I didn't understand the advantages using rye at the time. Yet as you can see it worked quite well.

That fall I had a very nice clover/wheat plot and by the following spring as you can see it was quite lush.

dogghr
03-08-2013, 07:36 PM
There are those on here that are a lot smarter than me, but I just personally feel you can over think planting a plot. The seed bank does indeed exist, but I spray for grasses each spring and sometimes in the fall and just don't think weeds and grasses have been a huge issue. I do mow the weeds to keep them from seeding.

This is the following year and these plots are now 5 years old and doing quite well.

dogghr
03-08-2013, 07:41 PM
I do now own a tractor and certainly that makes things easier. And now that I have a rototiller , I never touch the plow or discs that are sitting by the barn.

If you want to do small plots, certainly go for it. Farmers in their slow times, love to help a person out, usually only wanting a little for fuel and their efforts.

I keep my plot fertilized as needed and limed as required. I do soil test every 2 years just to keep on top of things.

You can see here that I had lush growth the following spring.

dogghr
03-08-2013, 07:42 PM
And if you can get the tractor, do so. It allows you to work at your own best times. And do a multitude of other jobs around the property.

soswine
03-08-2013, 10:16 PM
Pretty spots!!

dogghr
03-17-2013, 06:24 PM
As expected, the rye plots have started to really green up. The far brown area is a brassica plot that I overseeded last week with oats and red clover. It's been quite wet with snows and rains these past few weeks. The deer had worn troughs in the wet soil traveling from one plot to the next. Here's a few pics.

dogghr
03-17-2013, 06:26 PM
The red clover, rye, AWP, and probably some oats have begun to come on strong, despite heavy browsing.