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luckyone
07-11-2011, 12:09 PM
I'm just curious how members feel about / deal with neighbors hunting "the line"
We just bought a place and don't know what to expect this fall when it comes to that. No one has food plots around us and we will have them popping this fall. We know there will be a good pull to our plots and some are next to the neighbors. I know the one land owner bowhunts too. There aren't any stands right next to our fences, but how would you feel if the neighbors put their stands on "the line" and hunted off your efforts.

letemgrow
07-11-2011, 12:14 PM
I am good friends will all my neighbors and we all hunt the lines....this saves the middle of all the properties for sancturaries. Its a great setup.

Soybean Man
07-11-2011, 12:26 PM
I would go introduce yourself and be really nice to him. First impressions always stick. Tell him what your doing and your intentions on letting young bucks walk. Let him know it will benefit both of your properties if he would like to do the same. Don't "tell" him to do anything. Nothing worse than a new neighbor trying to tell you what you need to change on your property. Ask him his opinion on the deer's antler potential and soil fertility. Some people like to help others and you will find out if he that type. Hopefully you will gain a friend and great neighbor out of the deal. Offer to help him out or over for dinner. If he doesn't like you or your ideas, then you will probably know in your first meeting and then you can go on the defensive.

luckyone
07-11-2011, 02:36 PM
Thanks Soybean Man and Letemgrow, I guess i'm asking questions i already know some of the answers to. Assuming worse "defensive" scenarios (brown down, young bucks, sittin on fence, etc.,) i guess i wanted examples of how others handled things.

letemgrow
07-11-2011, 02:38 PM
Thanks Soybean Man and Letemgrow, I guess i'm asking questions i already know some of the answers to. Assuming worse "defensive" scenarios (brown down, young bucks, sittin on fence, etc.,) i guess i wanted examples of how others handled things.

I don't agree with what all the neighbors shoot, but really, as long as the deer is on their side of the fence, its legal. Their land is as good as mine. We both enjoy the benefits of hunting the lines so I like to keep it that way.

EddieC
07-11-2011, 04:26 PM
If you don't want a neighbor hunting by your foodplot, then you shouldn't have put it by the property line. Unfortunately, if you own a small parcel like me, then your options were limited.

Personally, I wouldn't put up a stand overlooking it. But if that foodplot actually changed the movement of the deer, then I would probably move to one of the access trails and cut the deer off before they got there.

I am a big believer in being able to hunt every foot of my property, and I don't believe you have to stay 50yds from the property line (or whatever distance people think). Now shooting over property lines is a completely different story.

Anyway, to get back to your post, there is nothing a neighbor could say to me to change my mind. But I also understand this is a two-way street and I better be ready for him to put a stand right across from me.

Alpha Doe
07-11-2011, 04:43 PM
Our property is a weird set-up. It is a mile long and only about a quarter mile wide. We have a lot of stands set up on the property line. When we hang a stand we try to keep them where the neighbor can not hunt. We only have a few areas that large timbers meet with the neighbors. The rest of the areas are where maybe their fence row connects with our timber. We will try and face the stand away from the fence, but that is not always the case. We are big time doe hunters and many of our neighbors are farmers. We try to do our best to keep the doe numbers in check and the neighbors know that and understand how importaint it is. Nothing has ever been said about where are stands are located. We give the landowner a call to track any animal and they do the same. As Letemgrow said...there land is as good as ours and we all benefit from each other. If there stand is on their side and in a great spot...Good Luck to them.

Now on the other hand...I don't like people that have leases of small property and they hunt the line, they have never found out who we are. How are they going to track an animal that comes on our property? They don't have any idea how to get a hold of us.

bush hill
07-11-2011, 05:32 PM
I have had the best and worst of line hunters to deal with on my property. I have six other land owners that border my property. Four of them are great and we would all help the other do anything. The other two are terrible neighbors. They own little acerage. One group doesn't even own the land, they lost it for back tax's and still hunt it. They shoot any and every deer they see. There are eight of them hunting 55 acres and they all "share" tags. The other bad neighbors own two acres and have two guys hunting over bait piles placed on the line (baiting is illegal in NY). I hope you end up with the good kind of neighbors.

ICALL2MUCH
07-11-2011, 07:06 PM
2 years ago we had a 201" STUD shot 20 yards across "our" fenceline. It is what it is.

I personally believe there are right and wrong situations to hunt the fence and it is completely up to the hunter(s) involved to know which is which.

On some of our properties we hunt the fence, on others we don't, and on some we hunt certain fencelines, and leave others alone.

Good luck with your new place! :)

luckyone
07-11-2011, 09:12 PM
Well taken. Thank you all.

cadizdeer1
07-11-2011, 09:20 PM
ive had 2 170s taken within 50 yds of my property line by the same amish guy. Its kinda annoying since pretty much all of his stands are right on my line which is deep hardwood timber. Just bad etiquette , IMO. Need to work harder I guess to get the biggins to stay near the center of my property instead of on the edges,

BSK_
07-13-2011, 09:01 AM
If line-hunting is a problem, and a friendly conversation with the neighbors doesn't help, sometimes it's best to get the law/game warden involved. Basically, use law enforcement as a third-party arbiter.

beauman
07-13-2011, 10:06 AM
When I bought my farm 4 years ago (after 10 years of leasing), I introduced myself to the guys who hunt the fenceline. These guys told me they've hunted there since they were kids. I reminded them the fence was the fence. I also told them we were trying to let the little ones grow. I might as well been talking to one of my black walnut trees! I left these guys alone. Last year, during shotgun season, there was alot of shooting from these guys. The property they have permission to hunt is an open pasture that borders my woods.
At sunset my son texted me to say there was someone walking within 100 yds. of him, in my woods! I stopped hunting and went there. Sure enough, two guys with flashlights. Said they were looking for a doe.
To make a long story short, I went back the next week. I found trees cut, a salt block, and a treestand, all in my woods.
The game warden was more than happy to come out! This guy was looking at 6 violations. This clown admitted to bow-hunting my woods, and putting out two salt blocks.
Shame on me! I tried to be the nice guy. No more!

Jim Timber
07-13-2011, 03:56 PM
On my block, there's roughly 900 acres of contiguous hardwood forest, and some of it is low wetlands/swamp. All owners in the middle have at least 80 acres, and then there's cabins along the lake border, and smaller lots along the county road. My property is in the funnel between the upper and lower lakes and the farm fields where they have clover or another cover crop in the fall.

My neighbor along the county road used to lease my land before I bought it; he's got hurt feelings about not being offered the chance to bid when I made an offer on the lot that "wasn't for sale" and they accepted it. I don't think it would've mattered anyway, because from his mortgage records he wouldn't have been able to even come close.

He's got 2 stands set up within rock throwing distance of my property now. One of those is within a couple yards of the lot line. There's a third stand on my lot, but I'm not sure who it belongs to. I've been too busy to go retrieve it (hang on, with screw in steps), but I did remove the bottom steps so hopefully they'll be ill prepared if they come back before I get it down.

My solution is norway spruce. In a few years, he won't be able to see into my property. I'm also putting in a plot in the center of the parcel adjacent to his. There'll be no reason for the deer to ever go over to his place. I'm also contemplating a barbwire fence along that lot line to keep him from claiming he didn't know where his property ended. I've already posted that section, and plan to increase the number of signs so you can see them from one to the next.

These guys are notorious in my neighborhood - 9 hunters that do drives across numerous neighboring lots claiming to be tracking a wounded animal. They came out in a field over a mile from the edge of their lease once. No one bought it, and no one likes them anymore.

lone cedar farm
07-13-2011, 06:28 PM
I had 1 line hunter since owning this property, i ran a 1,200' 12 strand barbwire fence and hinge cut sweetgums all the way down it 3' & 6' high...he moved his stand along with giving me a mean poochie face when he sees me. :D

Drop-time
07-13-2011, 10:47 PM
I hunt the lines, so do the neighbors. No issues. Small property owners sometimes dont have much choice.

Bullwinkle
07-14-2011, 06:58 PM
I have the same problem, in fact in one stand the neighbor has if he falls out the stand he will be trespassing. Here is what I did:

1. In a nice way make it clear you don't appreciate it

2. In a kind way tell them if you ever catch them shooting on to your property or believe they are doing so you will put up a 7' high fence. I priced it out at the time and to cover their 40 line it would cost me something like $2K. It would destroy their hunting and have minimal impact on my since I, as you, are doing all the work with the plots and habitat development

3. Make it clear to them that you have cameras up, are going to prosecute trespassers and ask that they contact you so you can join them tracking deer. Make it clear. Don't let them on your land with out you. That way they don't have any excuses and you get to investigate all kills that come your way

I share pictures with my neighbor and we communicate frequently. He is a good guy but has some family members that are doing this. He understands and respects my position and I believe is managing his family for me. I have the same rules for all neighbors and communicate problems. I also share pictures and hope they have great success killing deer on their land - just don't mess with mine

Tap
07-14-2011, 07:25 PM
I hunt the lines, so do the neighbors. No issues. Small property owners sometimes dont have much choice.

Yep. Around here, where 100 acres is a large property, you are never far from the line.
I'd rather have a neighbor hunting the line that does it "right" than someone hunting 75 yards off the line that has no concept of low-impact hunting or one that is from the "brown and down" crowd.

lone cedar farm
07-14-2011, 09:43 PM
my neighbor was not the owner, his father in law was the owner and he is definitly from the BID club. The finale event that lead to my building a high fence was opening day he shot a momma doe and her button head fawn and it was on my side. it was early around 8:00am when i heard the shots and by the time i arrived he & his buddy had drug them on his side and were loading them onto a polaris Ranger. needless to say he got an ear full and i almost took it a step farther but he high tailed out before i could pull off some clothes. This was'nt our first "run in". the killing of the doe & fawn was legal but shooting them 20' on my side of the line was not and it is well posted. This incident could have gotten real ugly, both these guys are local paramedics so hope i dont ever need their assistance! :o

I doubt this will happen again as it is now a rabbit can barely get thru the new fence & hinge cuts.

I know some good hunters that are line hunters but givin the right day, right buck...they would probably make a poor choice. I would guess it would be a tough call seeing a buck of a lifetime just a few feet from being on your side....i personly am not going to test/tempt myself. :)

fiveyear
07-15-2011, 11:29 AM
I hunt a line stand which is a road that parallels the line. 20 feet inside our property. We have planted pines and they have hardwoods they clear cut a couple years ago. Point being on a road you have to shoot fast. Further point is a lot of deer go both ways unharmed. If they are what I'm looking for (passed a lot over the years) and they stop long enough I will let it fly. I have watched more nice bucks cross the line the other way than I have harvested. 300 yds one way and 250 yds the other and a tyhird road going back to a field on our property. The neighbors also have maintained about 8 stands about 30 yds on the other side along the whole line. I have never been a big fan of line hunting due to the temptation. I try not to ever look over the line. To my knowledge I've never shot over any line onto property I didn't have permission to hunt.

Jim Timber
07-15-2011, 01:20 PM
my neighbor was not the owner, his father in law was the owner and he is definitly from the BID club. The finale event that lead to my building a high fence was opening day he shot a momma doe and her button head fawn and it was on my side. it was early around 8:00am when i heard the shots and by the time i arrived he & his buddy had drug them on his side and were loading them onto a polaris Ranger. needless to say he got an ear full and i almost took it a step farther but he high tailed out before i could pull off some clothes. This was'nt our first "run in". the killing of the doe & fawn was legal but shooting them 20' on my side of the line was not and it is well posted. This incident could have gotten real ugly, both these guys are local paramedics so hope i dont ever need their assistance! :o

I doubt this will happen again as it is now a rabbit can barely get thru the new fence & hinge cuts.

I know some good hunters that are line hunters but givin the right day, right buck...they would probably make a poor choice. I would guess it would be a tough call seeing a buck of a lifetime just a few feet from being on your side....i personly am not going to test/tempt myself. :)

Up here, that would've got you a Polaris Ranger, had you reported it to the DNR. ;)

lone cedar farm
07-15-2011, 03:03 PM
Up here, that would've got you a Polaris Ranger, had you reported it to the DNR. ;)

Not here, I would have gotten the ticket for threats. I see these guys riding thru town all the time in this ranger beer in hand and one eyed...like i said their long term Paramedics and friends with the "good ole boy" law enforcement...small southern town population around 850. My wifes a 911 operator and I know them all but dont go to their party's, they did ask me to join their elite hunting club though. :D If theres a fire or wreck after 5:00 pm no one shows up their all DUI. :eek:

I could write a book on what goes on in this little Payton place.....:rolleyes:

Darron
07-15-2011, 06:07 PM
Yep. Around here, where 100 acres is a large property, you are never far from the line.
I'd rather have a neighbor hunting the line that does it "right" than someone hunting 75 yards off the line that has no concept of low-impact hunting or one that is from the "brown and down" crowd.

We own 114 acres and our property is longer than it is wide. So property lines are not that far away even when hunting the middle of the property. I have agreements with three of my four neighbors that if I shoot a deer and it runs on their side I can get it and I told them the same. The fourth neighbor we are not on very good terms since I don't allow his son to hunt the property. When hunting on that end I try and stay at least 100-150 yards away from the property line. Every where else I hunt wherever I feel will give me the best shot opportunity since I now I can retrieve the deer if it goes off the property.

Tap
07-16-2011, 08:53 AM
We own 114 acres and our property is longer than it is wide. So property lines are not that far away even when hunting the middle of the property. I have agreements with three of my four neighbors that if I shoot a deer and it runs on their side I can get it and I told them the same. The fourth neighbor we are not on very good terms since I don't allow his son to hunt the property. When hunting on that end I try and stay at least 100-150 yards away from the property line. Every where else I hunt wherever I feel will give me the best shot opportunity since I now I can retrieve the deer if it goes off the property.

My definition of "hunting the line" is sitting on or within 50 yards of the line, but only shooting onto the property in which I have permission to hunt. If we sat far enough from the line that there was no reasonable chance a shot deer could travel to and cross the line, we would eliminate literally 80% of our property to ourselves. We would be stuck hunting a very small core that could, at best have only 1 hunter at a time and would also be over-hunted in short order. Sitting 100-150 yards from the line would also eliminate our ability to have sanctuaries.

I wish the property sizes around here allowed for hunting far away from the line, but sad to say, it's not the case. We own/control 120 acres of odd-shaped land. If we stayed 100 yards from the line in all directions, we would end-up with only about 20 acres to hunt.

Darron
07-16-2011, 10:43 PM
My definition of "hunting the line" is sitting on or within 50 yards of the line, but only shooting onto the property in which I have permission to hunt. If we sat far enough from the line that there was no reasonable chance a shot deer could travel to and cross the line, we would eliminate literally 80% of our property to ourselves. We would be stuck hunting a very small core that could, at best have only 1 hunter at a time and would also be over-hunted in short order. Sitting 100-150 yards from the line would also eliminate our ability to have sanctuaries.

I wish the property sizes around here allowed for hunting far away from the line, but sad to say, it's not the case. We own/control 120 acres of odd-shaped land. If we stayed 100 yards from the line in all directions, we would end-up with only about 20 acres to hunt.

I line hunt, I'll be the first to admit it. I've set up plenty of times 50 yards or so away from the stakes. If I had 500+ acres I probably wouldn't, but I don't. As long as I can legally retrieve the game from the other property I don't mind. We have one of the largest continuous tracks around our immediate area. My adjoining neighbors own 40, 29, 65 and 3 acres. Do I tell my neighbors that I "line" hunt? No. I just ask if I can retrieve game and all but one said yes. I feel less is more. The less they know the better. I am sure they line hunt on me as well (obviously due to size). I have not personally witnessed it, but I am sure they do. As long as we both don't show up the same day to hunt the same line area it's all good. I try not and put ladder stands anywhere visible from the line. If I decide to hunt next to the line, I'll use my climber.

With limited acreage, it nice having an agreement with most neighbors to retrieve game. We all agreed we can retrieve game only, not retrieve game and hunt at the same time.

Rio_Grande
07-17-2011, 02:21 AM
I say if you own it hunt it. I know one of my neighbors and he is cool, the other I have yet to meet, but he dosent effect my hunting area in any way unless I were to have a bad hit and have to track a long way. I have a stand on my known neighbors line and if he set up on his side we would just have to race and who got the shot first. That aint gonna happen cause he has alot better places to hunt than mine and knows it. If I had bad neighbors I would definately see it diffrently.

brutusbeefcake
07-19-2011, 12:13 AM
If line-hunting is a problem, and a friendly conversation with the neighbors doesn't help, sometimes it's best to get the law/game warden involved. Basically, use law enforcement as a third-party arbiter.
The only way line hunting can legally be a problem is if they are shooting onto your land or trespassing to get deer. The last I checked my neighbors own the last inch of their property as much as the middle inch. If a guy gets his shorts in a knot because they sit on the line I'd suggest he has a selfish ego problem and will only make things worse for himself in the future. I'm all for being respectful of my neighbors by not setting my stands on a line tree but there is no way I can demand that of him. Respect breeds Respect, retaliation breeds resentment and destroyed relationships. One must realize that with smaller properties your expectations have to be real. The best way is to get them on the same page with passing up bucks. If you get 75% them on your side that's all it takes. (that is usually pretty doable) the other 25% can be drunken brown it's downers and you will still see an increase in the quality of bucks in your area. We are living proof of this. I might also mention that most of our line sitters have begun passing up yearling bucks and when that happens you have a wonderful platform to build from.

Jim Timber
07-19-2011, 02:12 AM
Where my neighbor is set up, any bullet/arrow would pass through into my land (unless he was on top of the deer), and I'm NOT ok with that.

I don't see it as a greed issue at all, it's simply knowing your target and what's beyond it. When you start plugging my border trees with projectiles, I don't take kindly to it.

We have harassment laws here, which prevent you from disrupting someone else's hunting. This means I can't do what I'd love to do (stink out that section of lot line so no deer comes near it), but I will make it impossible for him to be tempted to shoot over the line by hedging it so badly you couldn't make out a deer let alone shoot one, and I'll do everything I can to entice the deer to stay on my side of that cover.

bigmike
07-19-2011, 06:02 AM
what pisses me off is every day i hear them riding the 4wheeler around. it scares the deer away.

BSK_
07-19-2011, 09:07 AM
If line-hunting is a problem, and a friendly conversation with the neighbors doesn't help, sometimes it's best to get the law/game warden involved. Basically, use law enforcement as a third-party arbiter.

The only way line hunting can legally be a problem is if they are shooting onto your land or trespassing to get deer. The last I checked my neighbors own the last inch of their property as much as the middle inch. If a guy gets his shorts in a knot because they sit on the line I'd suggest he has a selfish ego problem and will only make things worse for himself in the future.

So when a neighbor lines up ladder stands that are attached to the painted property line trees, and all of these stands are pointed into my property with no shooting opportunities back onto their own property, then I have an ego problem?

brutusbeefcake
07-19-2011, 02:42 PM
Obviously there is no ego problem based on what the neighbor does or doesn't do. It's how a guy handles it that will communicate whether or not he has an ego problem. And believe me, I've battled the ego issue many times and as long as I live there will be more battles fought on the ego platform.
Respect breeds Respect, retaliation breeds resentment and destroyed relationships.
What stinks is if my neighbor decides not to show respect then it ends up being me that has to bite my lip and show respect instead of doing what I feel like.
"A man convinced against his own will is of the same opion still"
Dale Carnagie
You can win the arguement but in the long run respect will make the diffence.
I would think it's pretty drastic to get the law involved unless you have hard cold evidence that he has trespassed or shot onto your land. I wouldn't think that just because he has his stand pointed your way that the law could do anything about that.

BSK_
07-19-2011, 02:58 PM
Obviously there is no ego problem based on what the neighbor does or doesn't do. It's how a guy handles it that will communicate whether or not he has an ego problem. And believe me, I've battled the ego issue many times and as long as I live there will be more battles fought on the ego platform.

If a neighbor is breaking the law by shooting into your property, that is not an ego problem. It is a legal problem that should be handled by law enforcement.

Jim Timber
07-19-2011, 03:40 PM
So when a neighbor lines up ladder stands that are attached to the painted property line trees, and all of these stands are pointed into my property with no shooting opportunities back onto their own property, then I have an ego problem?


Sounds like he's trespassing to begin with.

As for having to wait for the infraction to occur - that's correct. I've advised my CO about it and he said there was nothing he could do until proof of a violation happened, and then he'd be more than willing to assist me in prosecuting it. Which means I either need trail cam footage of him dragging a deer out, or I need to witness it in the flesh. He refused to discuss the issue with the guy in advance of a "situation." One of their stands is so close to the lot line, I thought it was on my property the first time I found it.

BSK_
07-19-2011, 04:05 PM
Sounds like he's trespassing to begin with.

As for having to wait for the infraction to occur - that's correct. I've advised my CO about it and he said there was nothing he could do until proof of a violation happened, and then he'd be more than willing to assist me in prosecuting it. Which means I either need trail cam footage of him dragging a deer out, or I need to witness it in the flesh. He refused to discuss the issue with the guy in advance of a "situation." One of their stands is so close to the lot line, I thought it was on my property the first time I found it.

Thankfully, that neighbor of mine is so dumb he poured out his illegal corn piles right on the property line--half on my side and half on his. THAT got the authorities involved real quick.

BSK_
07-19-2011, 04:15 PM
Honestly, I have no problem with a neighbor hunting near the line, even taking advantage of travel patterns I've created with habitat on my side of the line. I don't own the deer. They are a public resource. If a neighbor shoots a deer just as the deer crosses the line, more power to him, I'll congratulate him and help him drag the deer out, even if it runs back onto my property (and I've done so).

The problem I have is with neighbors that will position their stands so their only shooting opportunity is into my land. The intent is to poach. I'll have none of that.