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jaytee
03-28-2011, 05:24 PM
Had read an article in the Missouri Conservationist Magazine a few weeks ago and they were talking about the growing problem with Bradford Pears and how they are starting to spread beyond "city" boundaries. Seems they originated from another type of Pear that has bad characteristics and now they've cross polinated and are spreading. Columbia Missouri has even gone far enough to start some type of eradication campaign. Then seen on the local news this morning they are running a story about it as well. Just another instance of mans best laid plans screwing mother nature up. FYI.

letemgrow
03-28-2011, 05:41 PM
Glad to see they are working to get rid of them...to bad they will never get them all and will have to continue to do so.

HabitatMD
03-28-2011, 06:45 PM
One more reason to still with the natives. Every year that goes by, I realize what a problem they are. Real shame we unleashed another problem child.

brushpile
03-28-2011, 08:13 PM
I saw the news, and looked on my way to town. They're in bloom, and easy to spot. I saw many where it was obvious they weren't planted. That said, it isn't the sterile Bradford, so much as the Callory Pear rootstock they're planted on. Apparently Bradford breaks easily in a storm, the roots sucker, and Callory Pear rootstock suckers and produces fruit.

Correct me if I'm wrong! Callory Pear is sold as wildlife pears. Seems Callory Pear shouldn't be planted.

new forest
03-28-2011, 08:16 PM
Bradford Pear is one of the most frustrating trees I have ever had to cut down. Yuck.

Saw several young ones on a planting site today....

crimson n' camo
03-28-2011, 09:44 PM
That's interesting. I've got Bradford pears along my driveway that the previous owners planted years ago. They are very crappy and do break easy in wind storms. Already lost two and half of another one. All over my property are trees that resemble bradford pears but produce a small hard fruit about the size of a good size plum. They also bloom white same as the Bradfords. The fruit kind of resembles a pear as well. I'll take some pics and post. I wonder if its the stuff your talking about.

THE, LLC
03-28-2011, 09:51 PM
That's interesting. I've got Bradford pears along my driveway that the previous owners planted years ago. They are very crappy and do break easy in wind storms. Already lost two and half of another one. All over my property are trees that resemble bradford pears but produce a small hard fruit about the size of a good size plum. They also bloom white same as the Bradfords. The fruit kind of resembles a pear as well. I'll take some pics and post. I wonder if its the stuff your talking about.

That's exactly what they are. I mentioned in the apple/pear trees from seed thread about how they do that. Haven't seen deer eat those fruits though they smell like a pear and look like a crabapple (about the same size). I would think deer would eat them but haven't tested that yet. Apparently birds eat the small berry-type fruit on the brafords then crap the seeds everywhere.

ALwoodsman
03-28-2011, 10:04 PM
These started showing up on my property last summer. Now I have something else to deal with besides privet and honey locust.:(

crimson n' camo
03-28-2011, 10:05 PM
That's exactly what they are. I mentioned in the apple/pear trees from seed thread about how they do that. Haven't seen deer eat those fruits though they smell like a pear and look like a crabapple (about the same size). I would think deer would eat them but haven't tested that yet. Apparently birds eat the small berry-type fruit on the brafords then crap the seeds everywhere.

Well, that's outstanding.......I just fertlized several of them. :(

None of them are really big yet but they are producing. I thought maybe it was some type of crabapple. Thanks for the heads up. I might as well bulldoze my place down and start over. It had been allowed to grow up for several years before I purchased it and now its nothing but....kudzu, chinese privet, japenese honeysuckle, wysteria, and on and on.

I need to put a camera on the ones that produce and see what eats them. Something does because they disappear pretty quick. Could be coons.

deertrainer
03-29-2011, 08:26 AM
I had one planted near my drive way. Bought a couple of goats to clear some land and they didn't like being kept in, so they did some browsing on the wife's flowers:eek: and destroyed the pear tree. Ate the bark and bent it over and broke it off. Didn't realize at the time they were doing me a favor.:D Goats had to go though. (per the wife) So get you a couple of goats they love Bradford pear trees.:p

brushpile
03-29-2011, 08:56 AM
The original Bradfords were said to be fruitless. I passed hundreds of them, planted along Marine Blvd, on my daily drive to the Main Gate at Camp Lejeune. One Bradford Pear planted for each of the 241 service members killed in the Beirut Bombing. They served as a memorial and daily reminder of the many who died. Mile after mile, tree after tree... None of them had fruit.

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/2008/10/10292007mc_beirut25_lejeune/

crimson n' camo
03-29-2011, 09:08 AM
The original Bradfords were said to be fruitless. I passed hundreds of them, planted along Marine Blvd, on my daily drive to the Main Gate at Camp Lejeune. One Bradford Pear planted for each of the 241 service members killed in the Beirut Bombing. They served as a memorial and daily reminder of the many who died. Mile after mile, tree after tree... None of them had fruit.

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/2008/10/10292007mc_beirut25_lejeune/

It's not the original Bradford pear tree that has the fruit. Mine along my driveway don't have fruit either....only clusters of seeds that look like little cherries. If I am understanding this right they are saying that a lot of Bradford pears were planted on a different variety of pear's rootstock and this is casusing the offspring to be a combination of the two trees. So what is happening is that the seed from the original tree is planting this new variety everywhere through birds. It's this new cross breed that produces a fruit.

brushpile
03-29-2011, 09:16 AM
This is classic. An exotic is said to be harmless, but 30 years later...:eek:

Dogwood
03-29-2011, 10:15 AM
Saw LT's article about bradfords, a couple weeks ago, which was the first I had heard of the problem. Don't have them running wild, here... yet (knock on wood).
http://qdmworks.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/putting-the-smackdown-on-bradford-pears/

THE, LLC
03-29-2011, 10:26 AM
It's not the original Bradford pear tree that has the fruit. Mine along my driveway don't have fruit either....only clusters of seeds that look like little cherries. If I am understanding this right they are saying that a lot of Bradford pears were planted on a different variety of pear's rootstock and this is casusing the offspring to be a combination of the two trees. So what is happening is that the seed from the original tree is planting this new variety everywhere through birds. It's this new cross breed that produces a fruit.

Correct. Original Bradfords have the little cherry-looking fruits, the next generation has the bigger ones. One thing I've noticed about those, too, is that they don't fall off the tree until they rot.

THE, LLC
03-29-2011, 10:28 AM
I need to put a camera on the ones that produce and see what eats them. Something does because they disappear pretty quick. Could be coons.

Good idea. The ones I keep an eye on are in my parents yard. The birds ate the fruit off their bradford, flew over and sat on the pasture fence, crapped the seeds in the fence line, and now--several of these trees. They have quite a few deer around but I haven't seen them eat them. If they do, then they can spread all over my farm for all I care.

sagittarius
03-29-2011, 10:53 AM
I saw the news, and looked on my way to town. They're in bloom, and easy to spot. I saw many where it was obvious they weren't planted. That said, it isn't the sterile Bradford, so much as the Callory Pear rootstock they're planted on. Apparently Bradford breaks easily in a storm, the roots sucker, and Callory Pear rootstock suckers and produces fruit. Correct me if I'm wrong! Callory Pear is sold as wildlife pears. Seems Callory Pear shouldn't be planted. Question: the Bradford or Callory suckers/seedlings .... do the deer browse on them? If they are prefered browse, could they be left alone?

I have some wild crabapple trees, most likely seed spread by birds/wildlife .... the deer keep them browsed down to a 3ft bush. After caging a few, and three years of pruning, they are near perfect looking crabapple trees.

crimson n' camo
03-29-2011, 10:58 AM
Here is a blurry pic of some of the fruit just starting to grow. I was having to stand on top of the rhino to reach it and couldn't get the camera to focus on the dang fruit instead of the background. :mad: At this point it doesn't look much different from a normal Bradford.

I guess as long as they don't start taking over like all other exotics do then it will maybe just be like another crabapple in the woods. I think I will leave mine for now until a little more is known about them.

THE, LLC
03-29-2011, 03:41 PM
Just thinking, I'll bet the seeds from grafted pears would do the same thing. All the wild pear trees you see out in old pastures blooming in the Spring can't be from bradfords alone. I can remember seeing them like that for 40 years. Have bradfords even been around that long???

crimson n' camo
03-29-2011, 04:49 PM
Just thinking, I'll bet the seeds from grafted pears would do the same thing. All the wild pear trees you see out in old pastures blooming in the Spring can't be from bradfords alone. I can remember seeing them like that for 40 years. Have bradfords even been around that long???

Found it........

This tree, also known as Pyrus calleryana, is indigenous to China and Korea and was first introduced to western horticulturists in 1908. However, it wasn't until 1963 that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) introduced the Bradford pear commercially.

doctorbrady
03-29-2011, 05:11 PM
Sounds like lots of rootstock to graft to :).

fshafly2
03-29-2011, 06:01 PM
I noticed a few weeks ago that my neighbor's bradford pears have jumped across the paved road and are now growing in my front pasture - easily spotted because they are now in bloom. Thanks for the heads up, I'm going to nuke them...

-fsh

johnrpb
03-29-2011, 06:26 PM
Could you cut them off at 6 or 7 feet (above browse height) and then cleft graft scion wood onto them? I remember Ben mentioning on one thread that his nieghbor did successfully with an apple tree.

If you grow pears from seed from a tree that produced regular size pears there isn't a risk of them producing now fruit right? I know they won't be true to seed, but I never considered them not producing any fruit.