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jdeen13
02-01-2011, 06:43 PM
After viewing the post on elderberry I thought I would pose this question to the rest of you. If you could plant only 5 native species for wildlife what would they be? I know there are many variables as John stated in the other thread, but given five choices, whatever the application, what would they be?

Thump1
02-01-2011, 06:49 PM
2 Redheads, 2 Blondes, 1 Brunette

smsmith
02-01-2011, 06:50 PM
Trees, bushes, forbs, etc? Or five in combination?

jdeen13
02-01-2011, 06:53 PM
Trees, bushes, forbs, etc? Or five in combination?

I was more interested in shrubs and bushes, but whatever it is you would plant.:)

Younghunter
02-01-2011, 08:05 PM
I work mainly in heavier soils... so my answers are going to be skewed towards that...

These are the shrub species I've been focusing on:

Red Osier Dogwood
Elderberry
Hazlenut
Chokecherry
American Plum
Arrowwood
Ninebark

-Matt

letemgrow
02-01-2011, 08:13 PM
my top 5 shrubs would be as follows:
1. Dwarf Chinkapin Oak.
2. Hazelnut.
3. Elderberry.
4. Silky Dogwood (or other shrub dogwood).
5. Viburnum of some sort (nannyberry, blackhaw, arrowwood etc).
6. Wild Plum.

I know that is 6, but I would have to plant all of those where possible.

smsmith
02-01-2011, 08:29 PM
Home list (beautiful silt loam soil - near neutral ph) for shrubs/bushes/small trees in no particular order

red osier dogwood
american plum
hawthorn (think they're cockspur)
black raspberry
wild grape (when trained to stay low)

List for up north (crappy sand - ph in the low to mid 5's)

Hazelnut
beach plum
blackberry
chokeberry
ranetka crabapple (these could get to be bigger trees but I doubt it up there - also not native)

brushpile
02-01-2011, 08:31 PM
The top five plants will be the best from what the NRCS says will grow in your soil on your location.

However, all soil and climates being able to grow all things:

Wild Plum
Blackberry/Black Raspberry
Mulberry
Allegheny Chinkapin
Elderberry

I hate to stop there, because I'd be leaving out all the dogwoods, DCO, apples, hawthorn...

However, with all the snow, where will deer go?

Red Cedar
Spruce
Pine
Fir....

brushpile
02-01-2011, 08:39 PM
Home list (beautiful silt loam soil - near neutral ph) for shrubs/bushes/small trees in no particular order

red osier dogwood
american plum
hawthorn (think they're cockspur)
black raspberry
wild grape (when trained to stay low)

List for up north (crappy sand - ph in the low to mid 5's)

Hazelnut
beach plum
blackberry
chokeberry
ranetka crabapple (these could get to be bigger trees but I doubt it up there - also not native)

Red osier Dogwood is huge in northern states, but almost ingored in MO. I planted it thinking deer would hammer it, but they much prefer the native Silky and Roughleaf dogwoods.

Having seen how deer hammer ROD in WI, I'm puzzled.:confused:

smsmith
02-01-2011, 08:56 PM
Brad - could be as simple as the adult does not "knowing" the ROD is good to eat. If they don't take their fawns to eat on the ROD, the fawns are less likely to develop a taste for it (my theory anyway).

If they still aren't using it in 5 years or so, then they may never do so. It should be at least giving you some decent cover now?

tom tuchscherer
02-01-2011, 08:57 PM
On my home parcel which is heavy soils and damp,,,,,
-Wild plum
-red osier dogwood
-arrowwood
-ninebark
-highbush cranberry

Mostly because they do well and the thickness (stem wise) they produce.

RacksNQuacks
02-02-2011, 01:50 PM
After viewing the post on elderberry I thought I would pose this question to the rest of you. If you could plant only 5 native species for wildlife what would they be? I know there are many variables as John stated in the other thread, but given five choices, whatever the application, what would they be?

Alder, Redosier Dogwood, Spicebush, Silky Dogwood, Thicket Crabapple

brushpile
02-02-2011, 02:33 PM
Brad - could be as simple as the adult does not "knowing" the ROD is good to eat. If they don't take their fawns to eat on the ROD, the fawns are less likely to develop a taste for it (my theory anyway).

If they still aren't using it in 5 years or so, then they may never do so. It should be at least giving you some decent cover now?

I have Silky Dogwood growing intermixed with Red Osier Dogwood, and the Silky is browsed. Red Osier isn't native this far South, while Silky is. Roughleaf Dogwood is prefered over Silky, and all three have a similar appearence, so it's puzzling that deer could be so discriminating.

letemgrow
02-02-2011, 02:41 PM
I have Silky Dogwood growing intermixed with Red Osier Dogwood, and the Silky is browsed. Red Osier isn't native this far South, while Silky is. Roughleaf Dogwood is prefered over Silky, and all three have a similar appearence, so it's puzzling that deer could be so discriminating.

You just have weird deer, they won't even touch walnut. :p

brushpile
02-02-2011, 03:39 PM
You just have weird deer, they won't even touch walnut. :p

I have sophisticated deer with discriminating taste.:D

Tree Spud
02-02-2011, 05:32 PM
As I have both upland and wet areas, I would probably go with ...


American Plum
Beaked Hazel
Arrowwood
Speckled Alder or Red Osier Dodwood (Toss up)
Swamp Oak


Elderberry is a consideration; however, last year was my 1st year planting it.

new forest
02-02-2011, 08:25 PM
Hawthorn - huge range geographically, and site-wise from wet to dry (lots of tricky species to pick from though); soft mast and forms cover thickets too

Spruce - best thermal cover

Plum - see Hawthorn but wet sites, not so much perhaps

Oak - better than planting is releasing the ones already there. for planting, yeah, it will be several decades before the hard mast starts coming down, so they are not a big instant ego-gratifying project. but if a property doesn't have any, someone has to plant some. don't you wish your grandfather had?

Hazel - wildlife party in a plant

letemgrow
02-02-2011, 08:47 PM
Oak - better than planting is releasing the ones already there. for planting, yeah, it will be several decades before the hard mast starts coming down, so they are not a big instant ego-gratifying project. but if a property doesn't have any, someone has to plant some. don't you wish your grandfather had?



Exactly, it has to start somewhere with conservation so why not now??

UFi911
02-02-2011, 11:02 PM
I have more oaks than I could ever count in my life time, so keep that in mind with my answer.

Not in any particular order:

1) Wild plum
2) Evergreens for cover. Spruce 1st, pine 2nd.
3) Elderberry
4) Dogwoods (no preference shown on my farm, they eat them all)
5) Ninebark (cover mostly, but some browse too)

That's 5. If I was allowed a couple more I would add:

Arrow wood - I have high hopes for arrow wood, but its so damn slow to grow I can't say for sure.
Hazel Nut - seems to be a great species, early in my understanding though.
Alders - in the wettest spots. They will grow where others won't and create great cover.
Willows - same reason as alders.

One thing I've noticed on my property is areas that are barely used most of the year are FLOODED with deer in the winter. These areas are full of willows and alders. I'm not sure trying to keep deer all year round is a good thing, as they eat you out of house and home. But they sure like those "wet" spots when everything is frozen.

-John

new forest
02-03-2011, 08:42 AM
I've always thought that deer go to the wet terrain in the winter because it is the lowest terrain and thus has the least amount of wind. Add wet-tolerant conifers and there is no question such an area will hold deer over the winter.

sagittarius
02-03-2011, 10:03 AM
Elderberry
Wild American Plum
Hazzlenut
Service berry
Highbush Cranberry.