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midwest_170
10-05-2010, 04:41 PM
I have access to dog food for 1 cent per pound, I was wondering if...

1. Deer would eat it?
2. Would it be healthly to feed it to them out of a gravity flow feeder
3. If so should I mix it with corn?
4. Has anyone ever tried this?

This will end up being about 10 times cheaper than corn, so if this would be healthly for them I would like to try it.

npaden
10-05-2010, 04:51 PM
I'm a believer in supplemental feeding, but this sounds like a disaster waiting to happen.

Alot of dog foods do have grain as a primary ingredient and a lot of other fillers, but there will be animal protein in there. Mad Cow disease has pretty much been linked to feeding animal protein to cows and sheep. The first case of CWD has never been officially determined, but I wouldn't be suprised if it wasn't related to feedign animal proteins as well to captive deer in Colorado.

I would strongly advise against it.

smsmith
10-05-2010, 04:51 PM
Many dogfoods have animal protein added. I'd be very concerned about feeding deer animal protein.

You may want to do a search here for supplemental feeding. I certainly hope your post is of an "innocent" nature and not a troll - but just so you are aware - these threads get U-G-L-Y at times.

Roscoe
10-05-2010, 05:18 PM
I've fed dog food to our catfish before, but wouldn't feed it to deer. :D

Tap
10-05-2010, 05:28 PM
There are some brands/qualities of dog food on the market that I wouldn't feed to a dog, let alone a deer. Don't do it.

Bob S
10-05-2010, 05:53 PM
It is not a good idea to feed animal protein to cervids.

lone cedar farm
10-05-2010, 05:59 PM
It is not a good idea to feed animal protein to cervids.

Unless its ole Roy brand, I believe its 99.9% corn at least when I use to clean up poop from the pointers pen it sure looked that way and went straight thru one end out the other! :o

npaden
10-05-2010, 06:08 PM
Unless its ole Roy brand, I believe its 99.9% corn at least when I use to clean up poop from the pointers pen it sure looked that way and went straight thru one end out the other! :o

Actually even Ol' Roy has some animal protein in it. Maybe not much, but it has some.

Here's the ingredients:

Ground yellow corn, soybean meal, ground whole wheat, corn syrup, poultry fat, Meat and bone meal (Animal Fat Preserved with BHA and Citric Acid), Chicken by-product Meal, Rice, Animal Digest, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Vitamin D and E Supplement, Niacin, Copper Sulafate, Manganous Oxide, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Meadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex Source of Vitamin K, Calcium Iodate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Cobalt Carbonate, Folic Acid, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid

finnfur
10-05-2010, 06:18 PM
That ought to bring in every Skunk , Coon , Fox and Yote within 5 miles.
Don't know if Deer like it though.

VA/NJ
10-05-2010, 06:37 PM
I would not do it !

Younghunter
10-05-2010, 06:44 PM
... I'm glad you asked the question and hope that you reconsider...

-Matt

LetMGrow
10-05-2010, 07:27 PM
I have access to dog food for 1 cent per pound, I was wondering if...

1. Deer would eat it?
2. Would it be healthly to feed it to them out of a gravity flow feeder
3. If so should I mix it with corn?
4. Has anyone ever tried this?

This will end up being about 10 times cheaper than corn, so if this would be healthly for them I would like to try it.

The KEY WORD here should be DOG food!
At 1 cent per # it wouldn't be anything I would feed my neighbor's dog, and I don't like my neighbor's dog!

smsmith
10-05-2010, 08:14 PM
Not trying to create "problems" here, but may I ask why you feel supplemental feeding is necessary?

In some situations - like what Nathan has in TX - I understand the rationale for doing so. However, in most other situations I don't really get it?

Is growing the necessary food for your area not possible due to environmental issues?

midwest_170
10-05-2010, 09:08 PM
Not trying to create "problems" here, but may I ask why you feel supplemental feeding is necessary?

In some situations - like what Nathan has in TX - I understand the rationale for doing so. However, in most other situations I don't really get it?

Is growing the necessary food for your area not possible due to environmental issues?

I'm in an area that is all pasture, with cedars and brush that does not produce any food. The landowner will not allow me to put food plots in his pastures. Without supplemental feeding their would be little to no deer using this place once the grass is no longer useful.

Thanks for all of those who replied, I had a friend offer this deal to me, he said people have been feeding it to their cows, but I was concerned about the animal meal in the dog food, that is why I asked. There is nothing wrong with this dog food, it is just slightly out of spec, like 9.5% moisture instead of 9% moisture. It's not old roy or anything like that, it is high quality and usually sells on the shelf for 50 to 80 dollars a bag. I'm glad I came here and asked thanks for all the opinions, I'll just continue with corn.

smsmith
10-05-2010, 09:12 PM
I'm in an area that is all pasture, with cedars and brush that does not produce any food. The landowner will not allow me to put food plots in his pastures. Without supplemental feeding their would be little to no deer using this place once the grass is no longer useful.


Well, I won't give you the Bob S. answer ;)

I understand your situation - if you feel supplemental feeding is necessary then I'd use a product designed for deer. Personally, I wouldn't go with straight corn. I'm sure Nathan and some others here could offer a good, proven supplement.


Any chance the landowner would allow you to frost seed some clover into the grass pastures?

banc123
10-05-2010, 09:12 PM
Welcome. You started with a doozy.

Have you asked the landowner if you can no till plant grains, rye, oats, wheat, maybe even brassica ? Shouldn't have any impact on the land and might even benefit the cattle at some point if you let them at it.

midwest_170
10-05-2010, 09:17 PM
Welcome. You started with a doozy.

Have you asked the landowner if you can no till plant grains, rye, oats, wheat, maybe even brassica ? Shouldn't have any impact on the land and might even benefit the cattle at some point if you let them at it.

Yeah I asked about putting in some clover or brassica and he said no. This pasture has a really nice stand of native grass on it, and he doesn't want anything else growing out there.

smsmith
10-05-2010, 09:20 PM
Any chance you could add some soft mast somewhere? Apples/pears/etc.?

npaden
10-05-2010, 10:07 PM
Are you trying to attract the deer or are you trying to actually do them some good nutrionally?

True supplmental feeding is something that takes a significant commitment on your part of both time and money. I'm in a pretty low deer density area and the deer have plenty of alternative food sources except for a couple stress periods each year and I spend around $500 a year on protien pellets. I spend about the same amount on food plots, only because I don't fertilize or lime. (we have a high ph soil).

Here's a 151 page research paper on supplemental feeding if you are interested.

http://texnat.tamu.edu/symposia/supplemental_feeding_deer.pdf

Here's a much more "readable" article. For some reason their website is down so these are the cached copies off of google.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://trophyroom.com/blog/hunting/2010-03-25/is-supplemental-feeding-necessary-for-deer-part-1/

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://trophyroom.com/blog/hunting/2010-05-20/is-supplemental-feeding-necessary-for-deer-part-2/

bhanks55
10-06-2010, 12:08 AM
cattle growers will feed the cheapest thing they can find. I can tell you it is NOT the best thing for them either. Just about every time I have a call about some cows with weird issues on several farms at the same time I call the local mill to see what everyone has been buying "on the cheap" lately.

dgallow
10-06-2010, 02:41 AM
Dog rations are formulated to meet dog requirements. Deer rations are formulated to meet deer requirements. Hog rations are formulated to meet hog requirements and cattle rations are formulated to meet cattle requirements. Cattle rations are not purchased to feed hogs, so why purchase dog rations to feed deer. :confused:

The rumen and intestines of deer have the capabilty to digest most ingredients in dog food, but tricking the palate to encourage consumption is not likely. Small ruminants are highly selective and intake is sensitive to level of animal protein meal and level of added fat (probably fish oil in that dog food which isn't very palatable to small ruminants at the rates fed to dogs). One bad palate encounter with feed at the bunk (or feeder in this case) is enough to reduce visitation to that site for an indefinite peroid. The last thing one should want is to turn animals away from the bunk....especially during season? :confused:

Cases in point:
A feeder lid recently sprung a leak which allowed water to enter and whole corn to begin fermenting...deer avoided the site like the plague. The lyrics of 'Sour mash and cheap wine!" kept running through my head as the nasty mess was cleaned. It took several weeks before the 'normal deer crew' returned. No new visitors have appeared at the site which is abnormal for this time of year.

Many years ago we did animal protein byproduct supplement research with cannulated cattle (the ones with windows in their side). An Angus cow, named Blackey, habitually dove into the supplement pail as soon as it was offered with little regard to the contents. One day she was offered straight spray-dried blood meal (highly unpalatable) and promptly dove head first into the pail for a 'full-muzzle' which resulted in a negative encounter. Blackey refused to eat any supplement containing blood meal after the one bad encounter. The good thing about cannulated cattle is that refusals can be fed directly into the rumen thus avoiding the picky palate of a selective eater. Blackey had no choice in subsequent feeding trials. ;)

Stick with whole corn and(or) whole soybeans in feeders, those ingredients have feed deer well in the midwest crop fields for decades with little ill effect.

When supplement costs exceed the pocketbook, consider low cost tools for increasing deer food avaiability such as a chainsaw, a match, and pulling the trigger to fill all doe tags. :)

sandbur
10-06-2010, 08:27 AM
I'm in an area that is all pasture, with cedars and brush that does not produce any food. The landowner will not allow me to put food plots in his pastures. Without supplemental feeding their would be little to no deer using this place once the grass is no longer useful.

Thanks for all of those who replied, I had a friend offer this deal to me, he said people have been feeding it to their cows, but I was concerned about the animal meal in the dog food, that is why I asked. There is nothing wrong with this dog food, it is just slightly out of spec, like 9.5% moisture instead of 9% moisture. It's not old roy or anything like that, it is high quality and usually sells on the shelf for 50 to 80 dollars a bag. I'm glad I came here and asked thanks for all the opinions, I'll just continue with corn.

I would encourage your firiend to consider that his actions may lead to mad cow disease. I do not believe it is legal to feed dog food to cattle. Our country and beef producers have spent millions to elliminate mad cow in our country and to gain back some foreign beef markets.

smsmith
10-06-2010, 08:50 AM
I would encourage your firiend to consider that his actions may lead to mad cow disease. I do not believe it is legal to feed dog food to cattle. Our country and beef producers have spent millions to elliminate mad cow in our country and to gain back some foreign beef markets.

Good points from someone with extensive training in animal science.

EastALHunter
10-06-2010, 01:21 PM
I have access to dog food for 1 cent per pound, I was wondering if...

1. Deer would eat it?
2. Would it be healthly to feed it to them out of a gravity flow feeder
3. If so should I mix it with corn?
4. Has anyone ever tried this?

This will end up being about 10 times cheaper than corn, so if this would be healthly for them I would like to try it.

for $0.16 per pound I am having my deer feed Antler Boost manufactured in Girard, KS. That is for a 21% feed that is geared toward spring/summer antler growth. I'm not sure what the 17% feed is going to cost out of that mill. It's a project I have to complete in the next few weeks but if you are serious about buying some feed I can get those numbers together quicker. My guess is probably $0.50 cheaper per bag but that is a guess.

midwest_170
10-06-2010, 10:01 PM
for $0.16 per pound I am having my deer feed Antler Boost manufactured in Girard, KS. That is for a 21% feed that is geared toward spring/summer antler growth. I'm not sure what the 17% feed is going to cost out of that mill. It's a project I have to complete in the next few weeks but if you are serious about buying some feed I can get those numbers together quicker. My guess is probably $0.50 cheaper per bag but that is a guess.

I'd be interested. I tried to send you a pm, but your box is full.

EastALHunter
10-06-2010, 11:05 PM
I'd be interested. I tried to send you a pm, but your box is full.

dbwoutdoors@yahoo.com

Thanks!