PDA

View Full Version : Chestnut experts - look at this please


whitetail fanatic
09-29-2010, 09:22 PM
I hope some of you chestnut experts can tell if this is a chestnut or not and if so, would it be American or Chinese? The leaves were sitting out all day, so they have shriveled up a bit. I will try to get some better pictures of the actual trees sometime. Some of them are probably 30 years old or so, I'm guessing. If they are chestnuts, I'm guessing they might be American because I thought I read somewhere that the Chinese Chestnuts don't get very tall and some of these are probably 40 feet tall or so. There's probably about 20 trees in this area where I found them. In the pictures, there's one nut that is full size that I saw drop as I stood there looking at them. Other than that, all there was on the ground was what looks like shriveled up nuts that never fully matured or didn't get pollinated correctly or something??? I'm guessing that turkeys have eaten all the full sized nuts that have already fallen. There were lots of "husks" all over the ground, but as I said, no nuts on the ground except the shriveled up looking ones like in the picture and turkey tracks all around.

I just realized I forgot to get pictures of the "husks", they are still in the truck!

thanks for looking and any responses!

http://i738.photobucket.com/albums/xx22/whitetailfanatic79/P1000167.jpg

http://i738.photobucket.com/albums/xx22/whitetailfanatic79/P1000166.jpg

http://i738.photobucket.com/albums/xx22/whitetailfanatic79/P1000165.jpg

smsmith
09-29-2010, 09:36 PM
That's a chestnut for sure. Other than that I can offer no further insights. I imagine Phil will let us know............

brushpile
09-29-2010, 10:00 PM
Those are chestnuts, and if they are American, you have something big! I'll let letemgrow be the judge; he is our American Chestnut expert.

criggster
09-29-2010, 10:04 PM
I'm going to go out on a limb, HAHA, and say they are American Chestnuts. The husks would give it away for sure.

smsmith
09-29-2010, 10:08 PM
All I know is I'm calling "DIBS" on any you find yourself not in need of :D

whitetail fanatic
09-29-2010, 10:11 PM
quote"All I know is I'm calling "DIBS" on any you find yourself not in need of "

Unfortunately, it looks like most have fallen and been eaten already, but you're first on the list for any leftover seed Stuart!;) I'll be sure to check them earlier next year.

whitetail fanatic
09-29-2010, 10:17 PM
quote"I imagine Phil will let us know............"

That's what I was thinking before I've even posted...

whitetail fanatic
09-29-2010, 10:20 PM
Based on this, I believe they are American!!

http://www.mindspring.com/~psisco/www/overview.html

whitetail fanatic
09-29-2010, 10:22 PM
The link didn't bring you right to where I wanted, but just click on "Chinese and American Chestnuts" and then the "nuts" part

letemgrow
09-29-2010, 10:34 PM
Definitely has American in the genes at least, the shriveled up nuts are the ones that are not pollinated. Unlike an oak, a chesnut will produce burrs all the time whether they are pollinated or not with the nuts inside. The leaves have american characteristics in them for sure being long, toothed and tapered at the end.

Here is a guide to get really detailed with the tree and see for sure. The only way to tell a hybrid from a pure american is the microscopic hairs under the leaf.

American/Chinese Chestnut Link (http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro/comparison/)

letemgrow
09-29-2010, 10:35 PM
Here are what the leaves look like on one of my american chestnuts from the ACCF for reference. I do not have any chinese chestnuts on the farm and hopefully I never do :D

http://i327.photobucket.com/albums/k445/pes1979/Trees%20on%20the%20Farm/000_0384.jpg

hunt4fun4
09-29-2010, 10:36 PM
what part of Wi are you located in? and if you do have any left over after Stuart, dibs on seconds......

letemgrow
09-29-2010, 10:53 PM
The tree probably had quite a few good nuts produced too, they are just so preferred that they do not last long, squirrels, turkey, deer and if you have bear are all fond of those things.

Younghunter
09-29-2010, 11:13 PM
I like how we have experts on every topic on this forum...

That's an awesome find whitetail fanatic! Let us know if you can positively ID it as American!

-Matt

P.S. Thirds? ;)

P.S.S. I planted some hybrids this year from Oikos... hoping they will make it this far north along the Lake.

USFWC
09-30-2010, 01:03 AM
That is quite a find if it is a stand of American Chestnut...all the characteristics I see lean heavily toward it!

...fourths!!!

smsmith
09-30-2010, 08:56 AM
whitetail fanatic - is this tree on/near your land or is it on/near your uncle's (think it's your uncle anyway) land? You guys have some interesting trees growing - between this chestnut and the persimmons (plus your 750+ apple trees :eek: ) you should have the market cornered.

hardwood11
09-30-2010, 10:21 AM
On the Univeristy of Idaho nursery website they offer American Chestnut superstock hardwood plugs for sale (although it says not available this year). My question is in part of the description of the tree it says the following---

"This great tree grew over 100 feet tall, 4 feet in diameter and massive wide spreading branches with a broad crown. The good news is that it can be grown in the west blight-free"

(?) Can anyone explain what they mean. Are there chestnut trees growing blight free in the west? How far west? Just curious?

TrademarkTexan
09-30-2010, 10:33 AM
Yes, there are native American Chestnuts growing "Out West" without blight. I do not know their range

letemgrow
09-30-2010, 10:47 AM
On the Univeristy of Idaho nursery website they offer American Chestnut superstock hardwood plugs for sale (although it says not available this year). My question is in part of the description of the tree it says the following---

"This great tree grew over 100 feet tall, 4 feet in diameter and massive wide spreading branches with a broad crown. The good news is that it can be grown in the west blight-free"

(?) Can anyone explain what they mean. Are there chestnut trees growing blight free in the west? How far west? Just curious?

Oregon, Canada, Nebraska and I believe Washington have mature american chestnuts growing where the blight has not made it...yet.

whitetail fanatic
09-30-2010, 10:59 AM
quote:what part of Wi are you located in? and if you do have any left over after Stuart, dibs on seconds......

southwest WI

quote:whitetail fanatic - is this tree on/near your land or is it on/near your uncle's (think it's your uncle anyway) land? You guys have some interesting trees growing - between this chestnut and the persimmons (plus your 750+ apple trees ) you should have the market cornered.

I need to take a closer look at the tree though before I get my hopes up so high. Anyway, I'm sure they are very close to pure American based on the identification link I posted earlier and the link posted by Phil. Not sure if they are 100%, but my guess is they could be! I need to see if there is any good seed on the tree or ground yet that I could collect for this year.

Yeah, I need to see about getting some of those persimmons seeds from my uncles this year to get a bunch growing (hopefully).

Yeah, if I get most of those apple trees t-budded like I plan to, I might be able to market some apples, if the deer will let me:) :D