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crimson n' camo
08-27-2010, 06:47 PM
With the coyote population booming in my area I am thinking about trying to learn the art of trapping.

My question is: Where is a good place to buy some traps?...... Which traps would you recommend?......and....Do you have any advice for techniques on trapping coyotes?

dixie306
08-27-2010, 07:00 PM
With the coyote population booming in my area I am thinking about trying to learn the art of trapping.

My question is: Where is a good place to buy some traps?...... Which traps would you recommend?......and....Do you have any advice for techniques on trapping coyotes?

I trade with F&T fur harvesters fair prices and nice people to deal with, about the traps, you'll need to ck your state laws and see whats allowed, the best advice I can give you is read and study all you can, there's some good info on utube on how to get started, its not hard but its time consuming and does require some practice before going to the woods.

E_308
08-27-2010, 07:16 PM
I bought some through F&T last year - pretty good prices. For coyotes I always used #2-#3 coilsprings. The best ones I have are some square offset jaw #2's with a four coil upgrade. Very fast and powerful. I think those were Bridgers. If you start with coyotes you will be frustrated, I would start trapping coons, work up to foxes and bobcats, then you will be ready to catch coyotes. If you want to start with coyotes look up dirt hole sets and keep scent to a bare minimum.

ky_madman
08-27-2010, 07:24 PM
Like was previously stated, you need to know your local laws and what is legal in your area. Then I would check out my state/local trappers association. 3rd, I'd go over to trapperman.com and check it out. You will find the answer to all of your questions there and may find a local trapper that will mentor you.

banc123
08-27-2010, 07:40 PM
I tried it, it was fun, but only caught/released a dog. FL is the opposite, only snares allowed, no foot holds. AL can use footholds. Trapperman.com has tons of info.

Leg-hold traps having a jaw width of 6 inches or less. Leg-hold traps shall not have teeth or serrated edges along the inside jaws. Conibear traps or killer type traps shall not exceed more than 5 inches in spread for utilization on land sets. The use of snares (except powered foot snares with a maximum loop of 5 inches) is prohibited

All traps set in or beneath water must be checked at least once every 72 hours. All traps other than water sets must be checked at least once every 24 hours

Trappers are liable for civil damages if they cause injury or damage to any person or domestic stock as a result of using a trap or similar device

Any person trapping furbearing animals in Alabama is required to carry a choke stick.

Each trap must be identified with a plastic or metal tag bearing the license number, name and address of the owner.

mallard_drake85
08-27-2010, 10:14 PM
First off, not to pick on you or anything, but the proper name for these traps is a foot-hold, not a leg hold. The foot hold traps are designed to catch the animal across the pad of the foot not across the leg. If you are just getting started in trapping, I wouldn't suggest you spend alot of money on equipment until you know for certain you are going to stick with trapping. I've been trapping for 19 years. Go to your local farm supply store and look for trap sized #1 3/4 or #2's. These will be size traps used for trapping coyotes. I prefer #1 3/4's for coyotes because this size trap is ideal for foxes as well. One of the cheapest brands of traps you can purchase are Duke's. They are made in Korea, but they are a good value for the price. I have trapped an awful lot of fur with duke traps and I still use some Duke traps on my trapline. Once you have purchased your traps, you need to boil them for a brief period of time to get the oil and residue. After you have boiled your traps, give them a vinager bath. White vinager will work just fine. This is to speed up the rusting of your traps. Once your traps have taken a quick bath in the vinager, leave them in the grass for a few days or until the traps have a thin layer of rust over the traps. Once your traps have rusted, with a screwdrive and a small cresant wrench, adjust the trap pan until it nearly falls on its own, then tighten it up a bit more. Now, once your traps have been rusted, you have a few options: you may dye or just proceed to waxing.

To dye your traps, get yourself some walnut hulls and let them soak in water for a few weeks until the tannins have leached out of the hulls. Now let your traps sit in this dye for a few days until they have taken on a dark color.

To wax, get yourself some non-scented parafin wax, and melt it slowly over an open flame. DO NOT LET IT SCORCH OR OVER HEAT!!! Once your wax has melted, slowly dip your traps in the hot wax, leave for a moment until the trap itself has heated up then slowly remove the trap and let the trap drip for a few moments. You are looking for a thin layer of wax to cover the entire trap. From this point on, you do not want to handle the traps with bare hands as these traps are scent free.

You need to scout your areas and find the locations that are most probable for catching a coyote. Look for tracks, scat, or crossings under fences. There are multiple types of sets you can make, but the simplest is the one I use and have put up numerous coyotes and foxes with this set. Pictures will follow.

Standard Dirt hole set:

Scout your location
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260083.jpg

Select your set location
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260084.jpg

Scrape away a trap bed, and dig a 1 1/2" hole at a slight angle \ where the opening of the hole is aimed towards the center of the trap bed. Dig the hole about 8-12" deep. Do not discard the dirt, you will need to save to sift over the trap at a later time.
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260075.jpg

Stake your trap and then set slightly off center the traps position from the center of the dirt hole
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260077.jpg

more to come...
mallard_drake85

mallard_drake85
08-27-2010, 10:21 PM
Sift dirt over the trap and trap bed to blend in with the surrounding area
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260078.jpg

Bait hole with a piece of bait, we use roadkilled rabbits or pieces of beaver
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260081.jpg

The finished set
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/PC260082.jpg

Spray some fox urine on the hole, but do not get any on the trap bed.


The results
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j39/mallard_drake85/P1083690.jpg


This set works equally well on coyotes, foxes, coons, bobcats (where legal).


Hope this helps
mallard_drake85

Bodock
08-27-2010, 11:14 PM
Good work! That's as good a quick 'n dirty guide to trapping as I've seen.

auarchery
08-28-2010, 12:08 AM
Good advise!!

I will add a few that have worked very well here in Al. I catch most of my coyotes on a scent post set. I usually look for a road that forks to another road and in the bend of the road is where I make my set. Just like a dog pisses in the same spot in yard a yote will do the same if it smells where another animal has been.

I place a stick upright in the dirt and put some fox urine on it. Then place two sticks coming from the base of the upright stick in a v shape. I place 2 traps, one in the v and the other on the outside of either v stick. I normally like to set it where the coyote can't walk behind the scent post. Set your traps like the previous poster showed in his pics.

I personally prefer Victor traps.

As for bobcats, I prefer a trail set. Where you have a trail that kinda narrows down or has some brush on one side that makes them walk in a narrow area to get by it. I put brush on each side of the road with a small gap in the middle that they walk through. In the middle of the gap, I lay a stick and put a trap on each side of the stick. They will step over the stick and you have him.

For coons, I prefer baiting with fried pork cracklins, and you will also catch coyotes with this as well. I look for a small bank on the side of the road and put a small hole in the base of it, a little smaller than your fist, to put the cracklins in. I put my trap right in front of it. Break a few limbs to put to the side so he enter the set from the front. It doesn't have to be on the side of an incline, just make sure that they enter from the front of the set and can't reach the bait from the back.

auarchery
08-28-2010, 12:19 AM
Also, if you do take up trapping, get ready for a turkey explosion on your property the next hatching!:D You will need to keep it up annually, but it will be very worth it. You will learn a new area of woodsmanship that is good for every outdoorsman to know.

crimson n' camo
08-28-2010, 12:22 AM
Mallard! Buddy! Thanks! I just made it to the picture section and said.... "Good Lord!".... I ask for help and up pops a step by step tutorial. Appreciate it.

Au.....thanks as well...had to go back an edit my post after I kept reading a little! Great advice from all of you.

I think I get a good idea of how to get started anyways. I am no Daniel Boone or anything but I am a pretty fair woodsman when I want to be. I think knowing this skill would help me be a better all around hunter. Seems to make you appreciate the importance of scent.

mallard_drake85
08-28-2010, 01:36 AM
Mallard! Buddy! Thanks! I just made it to the picture section and said.... "Good Lord!".... I ask for help and up pops a step by step tutorial. Appreciate it.

Au.....thanks as well...had to go back an edit my post after I kept reading a little! Great advice from all of you.


Anytime, If you or anyone else has any questions on trapping, just ask. I'm not an expert but I'm more than willing to share my experiences and techniques with others. Trapping is a fading profession as there is not alot of new recruitment, so I'm always willing to help someone else get started.

Auarchery is correct about the turkey explosion. On 1 of the farms we have access to trap on, my bro and I have taken over 400 predators (coons, coyotes, foxes, possums, skunks) off this one 160 acre farm in the last 2 years. Last year we seen more quail that we ever had, and this year the farm is completely overrun with turkeys.

mallard_drake85

crimson n' camo
08-28-2010, 11:04 AM
I agree. You don't see many people doing it anymore. I can say that I have never avtually known anyone who trapped. I am the type of person who looks for any excuse to get out of the house and into the woods. I have always thought about it but knew that I was pissing in the wind to just go out and blindly try.

I have a large predator pop. in my backyard now (all of the above listed in your posts) so it will be a quick and easy spot to get the learning curve out of the way. I have a beautiful solid black yote that I caught crossing the field behind my house one day. I will try to dig up the pic. I wish I knew more about tanning hides because I hated not to do something with his coat (it was a little mangy though). Thought about having him mounted but then wondered if I really wanted a stuffed dog sitting in my living room. If I had a room that was strictly a game room I would have. He was a male that I had seen several times in the past. He must have spread his seed pretty good because I have seen other black ones crossing down the road a piece.

Beavers are another critter that have really spread acroos the south and do their fair share of damage to timber. Around here they seem to be in almost every watershed that funnels any water and noone traps them anymore either. I also have these in my back yard.

BeaverCreekhunter
08-28-2010, 11:17 AM
One other thing I haved used to die traps and wax them was Sumac seed clusters and cedar boughs. Put a pot about half full of Sumac and cedar boughs broken up by hand. Then add water till pot is about 3/4 full. Bring to a low boil for about fifteen minutes then put in traps. Let traps sit in this for around ten minutes then hang to dry. The sumac dies them a dark gray and the cedar boughs wax them.

GAGE
08-30-2010, 12:02 PM
One other thing I haved used to die traps and wax them was Sumac seed clusters and cedar boughs. Put a pot about half full of Sumac and cedar boughs broken up by hand. Then add water till pot is about 3/4 full. Bring to a low boil for about fifteen minutes then put in traps. Let traps sit in this for around ten minutes then hang to dry. The sumac dies them a dark gray and the cedar boughs wax them.

Black walnut/hulls make for a great dye as well.

GAGE
08-30-2010, 12:11 PM
I started trapping last season and had a blast. I caught a red fox, a couple raccoons, several possums, and my first coyote. I am looking for my first grey fox, bobcat and beaver this season.

http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/ll83/YAKGAGE/DSC08739.jpg

After reading all the books I could and spending hours on trapperman, I decided on MB 550's and they have yet to let me down.

npaden
08-30-2010, 12:29 PM
Great advice so far!

I picked up trapping a couple years ago to help with the raccoon population on my property and ended up trapping 19 raccoons on 160 acres in the first year! I've trapped coyotes, raccoons, possums, skunks, a porcupine, a wild piglet and for Christmas last year Santa rewarded me with my first bobcat!

http://padens.com/v-web/gallery/albums/album07/bobcat_trap3.jpg

Good luck!

dixie306
08-30-2010, 12:31 PM
Good looking yote Gage, this is my first double from last year-

ky_madman
08-30-2010, 07:09 PM
Good advise!!

I will add a few that have worked very well here in Al. I catch most of my coyotes on a scent post set. I usually look for a road that forks to another road and in the bend of the road is where I make my set. Just like a dog pisses in the same spot in yard a yote will do the same if it smells where another animal has been.


I catch most of mine on scent posts too. I'll usually have a flat set and/or dirt hole too. The scent post set will work on all coyotes. Plays on their dominance. I think yotes are more selective/cautious when approaching flat and dirthole sets. Make sure to have good backing so the yote doesn't approach from the back.

crimson n' camo
08-30-2010, 07:17 PM
I am definitley going to start trying. I will send some pics and keep you updated on my progress. I think this is a major reason why I don't see many turkey in my immediate area.

scrimshaw33
08-30-2010, 10:05 PM
How do you attach the trap to the ground or the chain from the trap to the ground? Are their special trapping stakes you buy what?

mallard_drake85
08-30-2010, 10:30 PM
How do you attach the trap to the ground or the chain from the trap to the ground? Are their special trapping stakes you buy what?

There are multiple ways to attach stake a trap. I mainly use 2 different techniques depending on the soil type. I will use use 2 24" rebar stakes in an "X" pattern. To do this, you attach 3 links of #3 or #4 chain to the swivel at the end of the trap chain. Then you run your stakes at opposing angles. this prevents the coyote from pumping the trap out of the ground which is pretty common. However rebar is heavy an cumbersome to carry, which is why I mainly use cable stakes. A cable stake is a 24" piece of 7x7 3/32 aircraft cable with an anchor on the end. You put your driver into the end of this anchor and drive it all the way into the ground then pull up on the trap to set the anchor. If you want these back anchors, you have to dig them up!!! Cable stakes are very light, and very effective and are what I recommend.

mallard_drake85

wolc123
08-30-2010, 10:31 PM
The "feathered rat" (turkey) population did explode at my place after a neighbor erradicated the coyotes a few years ago. I know there are a lot of turkey fans here on this deer-hunting site and getting rid of the coyotes is a real bonus for you guys, while for me it is somewhat of a tradeoff. I have to grow a lot more corn than I did before all the turkeys came around in order to get it to last thru deer season. My nieghbor is very good and he still manages to catch a few coyotes each season as they migrate into the area. You have to keep it up, the job is never done, coyotes will no doubt be on this earth long after man. The biggest problem I, or any QDM supporter may have with the coyote, is the disproportionately high percentage of bucks that they kill relative to does. This is a simple fact of nature relating to the fact that approximately equal numbers of buck and doe fawns are killed by yotes during the first seasonal "happy time" - spring fawning season. The problem is the second "happy time" - post rut, when adult bucks are wore down and slow - easy prey for the coyote, while does remain strong and fast. Who hasnt seen an old buck struggle to keep up with a doe, or group of does at the end of the rut? Which one do you think the coyotes are going to catch? There are some who claim that coyotes benefit the species by taking out the weak. That may be true, but how would you feel after stumbling across a promising 2.5 year buck that you had passed up several times on your place, but that was easily brought down after the rut by a pack of hungry coyotes? Many of the weak will get strong again if the yotes dont get them first. I will put up with the turkeys and be rid of the yotes. I have learned how to get corn in relatively cheap so there should be plenty to go around. If anyone wonders what coyotes like to eat, take a look in the belly of a dead one. Much as I have never examined a deer's belly that didnt have any corn in it, I have never seen a coyote's that lacked deer hair.

auarchery
08-30-2010, 10:43 PM
I primarily use a drag system on my traps. At the end of the trap chain I attach a swivel and then attach the "drag" to the swivel. My drags are 2 pieces of rebar in a J shape, then I weld them on the straight part of the "J" together. It is not stuck in the ground. The trapped animal will drag it a short piece before the drag gets caught on brush or a root. It allows the trap to get tighter and tighter without the coyote or coon pulling their foot out with.

It's pretty exciting when you see the trap gone because you just follow where the trap went through the leaves and find your animal. The only bad part is when a cat climbs a tree about head high and your eyes are on the ground looking for sign!!:eek:

crimson n' camo
08-30-2010, 11:03 PM
How do you all store your equipment when you are not using it?

Also, I imagine you all have something like a trapping tool box...what is in yours?

auarchery
08-30-2010, 11:52 PM
I have wire running from two post under my barn and keep them hanging in the off season so they stay somewhat scent free.

robert lawson
08-31-2010, 04:55 AM
Back when I was trapping I used rebar with a swivel and I added a spring to help stop the pull outs on the first few lunges that an animal made. All this trap talk has got me thinking I need to set a few this fall. My yotes are getting out of hand, Good luck.:)

dixie306
08-31-2010, 05:11 AM
How do you all store your equipment when you are not using it?

Also, I imagine you all have something like a trapping tool box...what is in yours?

CnC mine's in storage bins in the basment, one thing I bought thats a lifesaver is a 'bucket buddy" from Lowe's, it fits over and around the inside of a five gal bucket and has 30-40 "pockets" for holding everything from my brush to hammer and adjustment tools, if you decide to trap, get ready to spend a lot of time on your knees also so invest in a good pair of knee pads.

Deanmac
01-13-2012, 12:43 PM
great information, thanks guys,

TTT

BigBuck
01-13-2012, 02:03 PM
When using stakes or cables do you need to dye and wax those too?

BigBuck
01-13-2012, 02:10 PM
Could someone post a "list" of everything needed to set say 2 or 3 Foot hold / dirt hole sets. I have kinda of sandy soil BTW ( if it matters).

buckdeer1
01-13-2012, 03:08 PM
small digging tool,trap,stake {must be longer for sandy ground}bait,lure or urine,hammer to drive stake

buckdeer1
01-13-2012, 03:09 PM
I use small thin sandwich bags to put over trap pan under jaws before covering

BigBuck
01-13-2012, 03:14 PM
Dye? Wax? Swivels? Dirt Sifter?
I notice some trapping supply co. sell LOTS of different dyes. Any suggestions?
Most mix with gasoline!!??!!?? Any easier way to dye thats quick?

Jeager
01-13-2012, 05:12 PM
Dye? Wax? Swivels? Dirt Sifter?
I notice some trapping supply co. sell LOTS of different dyes. Any suggestions?
Most mix with gasoline!!??!!?? Any easier way to dye thats quick?

The type of dye mixed with gasoline (white gas/Coleman lantern fuel) is called trap dip. If using this method, it should be done in the Summer months to allow for sufficient "airing out" time.

Another method is to use Logwood Crystals, Liquid Dyes, Powdered Dye, Walnut Hulls, Oak Sawdust, and various other barks, berries and leaves, in a metal container large enough to accommodate the traps and enough water to cover the traps. After the water is brought to a slow simmer, heat is removed and the traps can be either removed and allowed just enough time to dry and submerged into the melted wax (a metal container just wide enough to accept 1 trap is necessary for this) or traps can be left in dye container for several hours or overnight, then re-heated briefly for the waxing process. A hot/warm trap will result in a better adhesion of the wax IME, but might not be totally necessary. The traps DO need to be completely dry before placing in the hot melted wax. If not, it can cause the wax to boil out of the container, which can and will cause a fire when the wax hits the heat source! Always have a lid nearby to place over wax container, for just such an event. Obviously, this whole process should be done outdoors, especially until one gets the hang of it. Using this method, I have caught canines after 1 week of "airing out" time. Longer airing time is best, but not always possible.

shack
01-13-2012, 05:40 PM
My buddy that I used to help on his trap line used a #3 wash tub full of oak leaves to boil his traps. They would turn black from the tannins. When we were going to make a set, we would roll out a piece of plastic to keep our scent off the ground as much as we could.

buckarood
01-13-2012, 07:10 PM
I just ordered some noose traps. I'm a beginner.

Jeager
01-14-2012, 12:09 PM
When using stakes or cables do you need to dye and wax those too?

Other than spraying off with a high pressure washer, I don't treat the cable with anything.

On the rebar stakes, I will dye and wax the top couple inches, just to cut down on the amount of corrosion the antifreeze used at the set will cause. Many professional trappers do not treat their stakes at all, just washed off. One of the main reasons for not completely waxing a rebar stake is that it will be slicker and lose holding power.



Could someone post a "list" of everything needed to set say 2 or 3 Foot hold / dirt hole sets. I have kinda of sandy soil BTW ( if it matters).

Assuming the traps of your choice has been modified, cleaned and ready to be set, the following is what I'd need to catch a canine.

- Heavy duty 22" trowel, for digging trap bed and 'dirt hole'. or one of the "3-in-1" tools (trowel, hammer, hoe--all in one tool).

- 2.5 lb. "peen" type hammer (if not using a 3 in 1 tool) for driving stakes and 'pounding' trap beds into frozen ground. There are modified hammers such as the "Mega Hammer" that many trappers use.

- Trap anchoring system. In sandy soil, I would use no less than a 18" cable/disposable stake or two 15" inch rebar stakes along with a double stake swivel. This part is extremely important, and I prefer to go slightly overkill anchoring the trap. Depending on how loose or wet the soil is, more length on the stakes may be needed than what I've mentioned.

- Trap pan protector, to keep dirt from interfering with pan downward travel. Many options to choose from such as fiberglass screen that's been cut to fit the size trap being used. Wax paper that's been "crinkled" will work as a pan cover as well as unscented toilet paper or precut foam that fits perfectly under trap pan or one of the plastic tools known as "trapper's caps" etc.

- Dirt Sifter. These can be homemade or purchased.

- Trap covering. Freezing and thawing as well as muddy soil conditions is often encountered when canine trapping, causing a need to keep the soil around the trap from freezing. If soil at the set isn't excessively wet, then using that soil mixed with some type of antifreeze will work. Salt, Calcium Chloride and Propylene Glycol is commonly used as trapline antifreeze. Waxed dirt can also be made or purchased and works well (no antifreeze needed). Some use Buckwheat Hulls as trap covering also. If temperatures remain constantly below freezing, then very dry soil can be used also.

- Lastly, a few ounces of Red Fox urine is a must have, IME. Depending on the time of year, some commercial lures work extremely well, if used correctly. Late season, some type of bait such as venison, beaver, etc. works well. When digging the 'dirt hole', I have better results (more catches) if the hole appears to have no end and lure/bait/urine is placed as back and out of sight as possible. The longer you can keep the canine focused on what's in the hole, the greater the odds of a catch.

Trapping techniques vary greatly from trapper to trapper and its just a matter of sorting out what works for the individual trapper. Lots of ways to go about it!

E_308
01-14-2012, 12:39 PM
All I have ever use to dye traps are walnuts. New traps I spray with vinigar to speed the rusting. Once they have a thin coat of rust boil them with 15-20 black walnut the riper the better. Should give a brown black coating and get rid of factory odors. My DP traps I don't do any prep.

luckyone
01-14-2012, 06:28 PM
get on trapperman.com and take in all that you can. good luck

sandbur
01-14-2012, 06:53 PM
The "feathered rat" (turkey) population did explode at my place after a neighbor erradicated the coyotes a few years ago. I know there are a lot of turkey fans here on this deer-hunting site and getting rid of the coyotes is a real bonus for you guys, while for me it is somewhat of a tradeoff. I have to grow a lot more corn than I did before all the turkeys came around in order to get it to last thru deer season. My nieghbor is very good and he still manages to catch a few coyotes each season as they migrate into the area. You have to keep it up, the job is never done, coyotes will no doubt be on this earth long after man. The biggest problem I, or any QDM supporter may have with the coyote, is the disproportionately high percentage of bucks that they kill relative to does. This is a simple fact of nature relating to the fact that approximately equal numbers of buck and doe fawns are killed by yotes during the first seasonal "happy time" - spring fawning season. The problem is the second "happy time" - post rut, when adult bucks are wore down and slow - easy prey for the coyote, while does remain strong and fast. Who hasnt seen an old buck struggle to keep up with a doe, or group of does at the end of the rut? Which one do you think the coyotes are going to catch? There are some who claim that coyotes benefit the species by taking out the weak. That may be true, but how would you feel after stumbling across a promising 2.5 year buck that you had passed up several times on your place, but that was easily brought down after the rut by a pack of hungry coyotes? Many of the weak will get strong again if the yotes dont get them first. I will put up with the turkeys and be rid of the yotes. I have learned how to get corn in relatively cheap so there should be plenty to go around. If anyone wonders what coyotes like to eat, take a look in the belly of a dead one. Much as I have never examined a deer's belly that didnt have any corn in it, I have never seen a coyote's that lacked deer hair.

Sorry I am steering the thread off of topic, but what do bobcats do to the turkey population?

We have (or had) some bobcats in our woods and the turkey population is down. They probably also did not have a good hatch after the wet spring. That leaves more corn for the pheasants!

banc123
01-14-2012, 07:24 PM
Sorry I am steering the thread off of topic, but what do bobcats do to the turkey population?

We have (or had) some bobcats in our woods and the turkey population is down. They probably also did not have a good hatch after the wet spring. That leaves more corn for the pheasants!

They eat the little ones for snacks. ;)

BigBuck
01-14-2012, 07:25 PM
Can you buy someplace traps that are already dyed and waxed?
Also, I saw some stuff called "Full Metal Jacket" that is a 1 step dip.....Is that stuff any good?

luckyone
01-14-2012, 07:45 PM
Can you buy someplace traps that are already dyed and waxed?
Also, I saw some stuff called "Full Metal Jacket" that is a 1 step dip.....Is that stuff any good?

None of the dips will work unless the trap is completely free of grease/oil.
Also, never dip a trap at the last minute and expect it to be dry / non - tacky / scent free. Many will claim to be ready right away, but giving them a couple months to dry is the only way to go.
Also, if you ever want to go back to the tried and true method of dying / waxing, you will find it near impossible to remove the dip from your trap. Go one way or the other.
As to FMJ dip, iv'e never used it, but with a COMPLETELY grease/oil free trap most dips out there will hold up well given enough time to dry.
As for me i'm done with dips (other than the ones that already are) and sticking to the dye and wax.

Jeager
01-14-2012, 08:27 PM
I haven't tried the FMJ dip either, but my opinion on the dips in general is pretty much exactly the same as Luckyone.

This guy might be worth checking for traps that's ready to go, doubtful, but maybe. http://www.trapperartssupply.com/usedtrapsnotice.html

If cable restraints/snares are legal at your location, that might be an option to get you in the field sooner .. :D

PAPADUDE
01-14-2012, 08:40 PM
Big Buck there is no such thing as quick and easy when it comes to trapping coyotes and other varmits. It is a long learning process that we go through to become a "trapper." My advice is to join your state trapping association and get on a couple of the trapping forums like Trapperman. com and the best thing you can do is to locate a local trapper and ask to ride along and learn from him. To try and jump into trapping by throwing a bunch of steel in the ground and hoping to catch something does not do the sport or the target animals justice. Trapping is one of the greatest sports there is,and will teach you more about the outdoors than most other outdoor activities.

BigBuck
01-15-2012, 08:37 AM
Thanks for the info guys!
I will be ready for next season!:)