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View Full Version : New sand point well....not driven by Tony L


foggy
07-02-2010, 08:24 PM
I just completed my sandpoint well....and thought I would share a little on what I learned.

First I VACUUMED a starter hole using my shop vac. I made a few "saw tooth" grooves in the end of the plastic vac tube....turned on the vac and sucked up the sandy-loam soil. I hit a few small roots, and used a 2.5" pipe to ram through the roots....and kept vacuuming to a depth of about 4 feet. I could have gone further but I ran out of solid tube. This four feet depth took but a few minutes to make a hole....but I have the right soil for this task.

Next.....I purchased a stainless drive point, drive couplings, (5) 5 foot lengths of pipe, pipe dope and a pitcher pump. I rented a 40 lb jack hammer and the tools to drive pipe from the local rental yard. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS METHOD TO DRIVE A WELL. If I had rocky soil or clay, I would have used a 60 lb hammer as I think it would drive allot better....but I may have needed more help to lift it.

I used a 2 foot level to get the pipe started straight (the little starter hole was very true) and started pounding the pipes. I used a short pipe and coupling as a "sacrificial" end to the pounding.....and had to replace it once. The actual well driving went smoothly....my wife even took a "turn" to experience running a jackhammer (lol...what a girl). All was done in an hour or so. The most work was keeping the couplings tight and turning the wrenches.

I "over-drove" the point...and had to use a handyman jack to lift the pipe and remove one section......but, long-story-short, I now have a 21 foot deep well with plentiful, clear, cold, water.

I used the pitcher pump to clear up the well...and made a trip to Mills Fleet to buy a jet pump and tank. I used the well to water my seedlings today and the well was putting out almost 10 gallons a minute.

I figure the entire project with pump(s) cost me about $700. A VERY NICE addition to my deer land......and my old "water buffalo" trailer is over at the consignment yard and put up for sale. :D

Next thing is to bury a GFI wire and get a dog house for the pump.

foggy
07-02-2010, 08:40 PM
a few more pics......

foggy
07-02-2010, 08:46 PM
more pics? Me and posting pictures is a really frustrating experience. If these computers are supposed to be so smart...why cant they resize my pics for me without all this wasted time? (rant over) I like my well. :D :D

The last pic shows the re-configured well fittings after removing a Tee (which was giving me an air leak). I also put in a coupling in order to remove my well for winter storage. Note the brass check valve just before the elbow. This keeps the water available for the pump without having to prime each time the pump runs. A "pressure switch" turns on / off the pump as needed to maintain a constant water pressure. Kinda a deluxe set up for my deer land....but I figure I am "worth it"....lol. (this set up is common for many cabins and homes around here)

banc123
07-02-2010, 08:49 PM
Wow, I guess thats how they did it in the old days. Minus the jack hammer. Pound pipes until you hit water.:D

Pretty impressive. I pounded an 8ft ground rod today I thought I might hit water. How did you know how deep you had to go and where the "point" was ?

foggy
07-02-2010, 08:55 PM
Wow, I guess thats how they did it in the old days. Minus the jack hammer. Pound pipes until you hit water.:D

Pretty impressive. I pounded an 8ft ground rod today I thought I might hit water. How did you know how deep you had to go and where the "point" was ?

Sand point wells are actually pretty common in much of MN. We have allot of water available without going too deep (thus all the lakes). Lots of lake cabins use a shallow sand point well as their primary water source.

I have pretty nice clear water. I don't plan to drink it....but may test it anyway to see what I have. Its definitely going to be allot easier to water my seedlings now. ;)

KYDeerSteward
07-02-2010, 09:07 PM
Great looking setup! was wondering the same thing on knowing the depth? On resizing the photos, might try this: scroll down the list to image resizer.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/xppowertoys.mspx

foggy
07-02-2010, 09:13 PM
Wow, I guess thats how they did it in the old days. Minus the jack hammer. Pound pipes until you hit water.:D

Pretty impressive. I pounded an 8ft ground rod today I thought I might hit water. How did you know how deep you had to go and where the "point" was ?

I used a 1/2" nut on a string to drop down into the well to check for water. When you hear the nut "splash" it sorta "floats" then goes to the bottom of the sand point. You can see (or measure) how much string is wet....thus how deep the water in the well is. I have about 10 feet of water in my well...before it would go dry....such as could happen in a very dry period??

Also, when pounding the pipe....we would fill the pipe occasionally with water....and when the water drains the pipe (you can see it real easy) then you know your in the aquifer. (I actually went past the aquifer and had to pull the pipe up a few feet.....was a strange experience)

Its all a bit of "smoke and mirrors". ;)

foggy
07-02-2010, 09:25 PM
Great looking setup! was wondering the same thing on knowing the depth? On resizing the photos, might try this: scroll down the list to image resizer.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/xppowertoys.mspx

Thanks for the tip on the Windows pic re-sizer.....I will give it a try. Resizing pics is truly one of the most frustrating things I do online...and prevents me from posting more often (which may be a good thing...lol). Thanks again!!

Thump1
07-02-2010, 10:02 PM
Thx for posting this Foggy. I grew up w\ sandpoints and had thought about one for our cabin here. Then I found out my neighbors well is at 200 ft.

foggy
07-02-2010, 10:14 PM
Thx for posting this Foggy. I grew up w\ sandpoints and had thought about one for our cabin here. Then I found out my neighbors well is at 200 ft.

If your near a lake, swamp or pond...chances are good you can make a shallow well (a shallow well, by definition, is anything less than 25 feet deep and could be operated with a pitcher pump or an above ground pump).

Before I drove my sand point well.....I talked with a well driller. He said his price for a new well "began" at about 5k (if I remember right). I don't think a driller will put in any shallow wells....and I don't know what the laws are for a professionally drilled well....but I belive they need to go "deep". I did not want to pay the kind of money a driller charges....for my purposes.

I believe a sand point well is pretty much a do-it-yourself project here in MN....as there could be too many problems with contaminated water when you go with a shallow well. Also....what "driller" wants to put in this kind of work for a couple hundred bucks??...especially considering the liability.

M. R. Byrd
07-02-2010, 10:17 PM
Hey, let me do that tough work of resizing your pictures and you come out to Dodge and do the easy work of putting down a couple wells for me. Deal?:)

foggy
07-02-2010, 10:26 PM
Hey, let me do that tough work of resizing your pictures and you come out to Dodge and do the easy work of putting down a couple wells for me. Deal?:)

Not a chance! I gotta believe you could drive pipe half way to china before you get water down your way. ;) I WILL learn pic resizing....sooner or later.

Speaking of Dodge KS....I used to work with a guy who's uncle was none other than Wyatt Earp. This guy has passed now (his name was Earp too)...but he told me his recollections of sitting on uncle Wyatt's lap and hearing stories of the old days, etc.

sandbur
07-02-2010, 10:31 PM
Foggy-This post of yours brings back many memories. My Dad had us pound in many wells in that country. We pounded them by hand with a driver, but otherwise the process was the same.

Yup, I've gone to far and had to pull them back a bit. We also occasionally would shoot down one with a 30.06, trying to clear the silt from the screen.

M. R. Byrd
07-02-2010, 10:32 PM
Speaking of Dodge KS....I used to work with a guy who's uncle was none other than Wyatt Earp. This guy has passed now (his name was Earp too)...but he told me his recollections of sitting on uncle Wyatt's lap and hearing stories of the old days, etc.

Now that is neat. The main drag in Dodge is Wyatt Earp Blvd. Here he is on the streets of Dodge today, well not actually today, but you know what I mean.

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa152/MaynardReeceByrd/Storm29Dec0600025.jpg

foggy
07-02-2010, 10:47 PM
Foggy-This post of yours brings back many memories. My Dad had us pound in many wells in that country. We pounded them by hand with a driver, but otherwise the process was the same.

Yup, I've gone to far and had to pull them back a bit. We also occasionally would shoot down one with a 30.06, trying to clear the silt from the screen.

I've read about "shooting" a well. I always wondered if that was an "old wives tale".....or if it worked. (In time gone by..."shooting it" was a solution for everything...lol). I would think the bullet would have little effect on silt.....but what do I know? ;)

I had thought we were going to come up dry on this well....and then I lifted one section of pipe outtta the deal.....and VIOLA....all the water you could want. VERY STRANGE deal....I don't fully understand it....but I aint about to argue. It was a real good feeling to drive my own well.....and the jack hammer really makes it easy. :) "Easy" being a relative term....lol.