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sacco
10-29-2009, 01:47 PM
i'd like to compile a list of bushes/shrubs/small trees that i can plant in zone 4 or 5 that are easy growing, highly attractive to deer, and tough enough to take a beatin' from the deer (medium deer density)

top of my list right now is arrowwood. also leaning towards beach plums. any other suggestions?

sacco
10-29-2009, 01:50 PM
winterberry is also on the list, but doesn't seem to be as tough or fast growing as arrowwood.

letemgrow
10-29-2009, 02:08 PM
eastern wahoo and hazelnuts should be included IMO

brushpile
10-29-2009, 02:38 PM
Silky Dogwood, Red Osier Dogwood, Flowering Dogwood, White Cedar, Balsam Fur, Wild Plum and of course apples.

Timber Doodle
10-29-2009, 02:54 PM
Out of all the evergreens why balsam fir? Just curious on your opinion of its qualities.

It was one evergreen I was thinking of planting along with the spruce since they seem to provide as good of thermal cover.

E_308
10-29-2009, 03:15 PM
I am thinking of the same thing for a 3 acre piece of ground. I would like to plant some "brush", maybe plums? Has to be native and not spread. I planted some DCO acorns last week and am in the planning stages of what to plant in the spring.

M.Magis
10-29-2009, 03:25 PM
Just curious, why do I sometimes see hazelnuts suggested? Squirrels and chipmunks like them, but thatís about it.

sagittarius
10-29-2009, 03:31 PM
Just curious, why do I sometimes see hazelnuts suggested? Squirrels and chipmunks like them, but thatís about it.Deer browse the stems hard.

American wild plum, highbush cranberry, service berry, nanny berry, nine bark, elderberry ....

These may need to be caged/protected to become established.

M.Magis
10-29-2009, 03:41 PM
Interesting. I have a fencerow with several large batches of hazelnuts. The deer pay zero attention to them, other than small bucks usually make a few little rubs each year.

letemgrow
10-29-2009, 03:57 PM
Interesting. I have a fencerow with several large batches of hazelnuts. The deer pay zero attention to them, other than small bucks usually make a few little rubs each year.

I have some too the deer never touch...but the seedlings they browse hard. The older shrubs that are much taller do not get paid much attention to.

brushpile
10-29-2009, 10:27 PM
Sacco, Winterberry/Deciduous Holly is absolutely hammered on my place. They got hit the week they were planted, and didn't even have leaves yet! I scattered them around several acres, and deer sniffed out every last one. I don't care about berries some day, they are highly preferred browse now...and since I planted them, and my neighbors don't have any...:D

Timber Doodle, I recommended Balsam Fir because it is outstanding thermal protection, and because it is highly preferred browse.

M. Magnus, Hazelnuts produce nuts in two years, and form thickets. I was raised in WI, and in WI deer ate Hazelnuts... heck, they put them in chocolate bars. They are a sweet, fast nut producer, and deer eat the hulls and all.

Elderberry is eaten during deer season, and provides Winter browse. I just had an 8' bush leveled by a buck. That's not a problem like it might be with other plants, and I got a kick out of it. That bush will be 8' again next year!

pinwheel
10-29-2009, 10:38 PM
Have ya got elm or buckbrush in your area? If you've got elm, just cut them off at ground level & they'll sprout back. Deer will browse them heavy. If you've got buckbrush, cut trash trees & allow sunlight to the floor & it will grow. More than likely, you've already got most everything you need if you've got timber, you just need to identify what has wildlife value & work to enhance what's already there growing native.

brushpile
10-29-2009, 11:07 PM
I like to plant to get diversity, and because I just like to plant. However, what Pinwheel posted is absolutely correct. I cut Elm and Hackberry back to browse level, and deer hammer the regrowth. Whatever deer are eating your location will produce more food faster than planting, if it's returned to browse level.

Bob S
10-30-2009, 01:38 AM
I recommended Balsam Fir because it is outstanding thermal protection, and because it is highly preferred browse.Balsam Fir does provide excellent thermal cover. But, in Michigan it is considered a starvation food. If your deer are browsing Balsam Fir you have too many deer.

Token_Lake
10-30-2009, 01:39 AM
Our's seem to LOVE fresh blueberry bushes. Without being caged they were always nub's in the ground for the last 5 year's. I finally caged the area this summer that i " thought " they were in and now they are almost 2 feet tall ! :rolleyes:

M.Magis
10-30-2009, 07:43 AM
I was raised in WI, and in WI deer ate Hazelnuts... heck, they put them in chocolate bars. They are a sweet, fast nut producer, and deer eat the hulls and all.

Are we talking about the same thing? Hazelnuts that's I'm aware of have an extrmely hard shell and the deer sure don't eat them.
I like them myself, but darn near need a hammer to get them out.

Dogwood
10-30-2009, 07:52 AM
Are we talking about the same thing? Hazelnuts that's I'm aware of have an extrmely hard shell and the deer sure don't eat them.
I like them myself, but darn near need a hammer to get them out.

that sounds more like hickory nuts, to me, Magis. I think deer do eat hazelnuts, but then again, we don't have many here for them to eat.:(

jdunham
10-30-2009, 11:53 AM
Red Osier dogwood is worth a look. Deer browse mine pretty heavy. I finally put mine in tubes and what a difference. The shrubs that have been in the ground for a few years are there but they get browsed back every year. Lots of activity in the patch I planted them in.

brushpile
10-30-2009, 12:10 PM
Hazelnuts are preferred hard mast for deer, and have more protien than acorns. My Hazelnuts produced a few nuts the year after they were planted. Hazelnuts grow on a bush, which provides great brushy cover for deer and other wildlife. Planting Hazelnuts is the fastest way I can think of to produce nuts for deer to eat.

Possibly it's being confused with Hickory nuts. This is Hazelnut:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corylus_americana

M.Magis
10-30-2009, 12:17 PM
I know what a hickory nut is. These are hazelnuts. The same thing you buy in the grocery store, though mine are smaller. Very hard shell and certainly not deer food.

Here's a picture off the web. Notice the nut cracker.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/banibani/302207674/

letemgrow
10-30-2009, 12:22 PM
In northern MO deer browse hazelnuts and they provide great cover. If deer do not eat the nuts then lots of other species do so they are a win win to me. I never can find a hazelnut on the ground and have to pick them from the bush so something must really love them. :D

M.Magis
10-30-2009, 12:42 PM
In northern MO deer browse hazelnuts and they provide great cover. If deer do not eat the nuts then lots of other species do so they are a win win to me. I never can find a hazelnut on the ground and have to pick them from the bush so something must really love them. :D
Chipmunks grab mine as soon as they hit the ground it seems. Like you, I have to pick them before they fall, but plenty are below eye level. If the deer were eating them all the low ones would be gone.

smsmith
10-30-2009, 02:10 PM
From Dave's Garden:

"Hazelnut (Corylus americana) is a small tree or large shrub typically reaching no more than 10 feet tall at maturity. Deer and moose forage the leaves and twigs of hazelnut plants. Nuts are eaten by deer, foxes, grouse, pheasants, quail, squirrels and turkeys. Catkins are eaten by turkey and ruffed grouse in the winter months. The growth habit of C. americana provides nesting and cover for small mammals. Native to the U.S."

From the US Forest Service database:

"IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE :
The leaves, twigs, and catkins of American hazelnut are browsed by deer and
moose [11,24]. The nuts are eaten by small mammals, northern bobwhite,
ruffed grouse and other large birds, and deer [19.20]. Beaver eat the bark
[20]."

sacco
12-01-2009, 10:10 AM
here's my list of shrubs i settled on for spring 2010 planting-

25 winterberry
30 silky dogwood
10 arrowwood
30 highbush cranberry
10 flowering dogwood
10 redoiser dogwood
10 golden currant
10 am.beautyberry
50 dwarf chink oaks

some of them would not be my first choice but came in DNR wildlife package deals. ideally i would have also chosen different amounts but again, most of these came in package deals.
these are in addition to the 175 seedling trees i'll be planting. i'm gonna need to take 2 weeks of vacation just for clearing and planting!
i came to this website just for tips on what to plant in my small annual foodplot. you guys are killin me!

top contenders for 2011 are more arrowwood, plums, elderberry, bayberry...

smsmith
12-01-2009, 10:26 AM
sacco - let me know if the beauty berry survives your winters. I've wanted to try some, but have been afraid they aren't winter hardy enough.

brushpile
12-01-2009, 10:26 AM
Thats a good list, especially when you add next year's plants. Next year you will also be able to multiply your plants by taking cuttings.

sacco
12-01-2009, 08:08 PM
sacco - let me know if the beauty berry survives your winters. I've wanted to try some, but have been afraid they aren't winter hardy enough.


Next year you will also be able to multiply your plants by taking cuttings.



will let you know.

that's the plan!

letemgrow
12-01-2009, 08:48 PM
here's my list of shrubs i settled on for spring 2010 planting-

25 winterberry
30 silky dogwood
10 arrowwood
30 highbush cranberry
10 flowering dogwood
10 redoiser dogwood
10 golden currant
10 am.beautyberry
50 dwarf chink oaks



That looks like a pretty good list to me!! Most of those are highly preferred deer browse.

ruskbucks
12-01-2009, 09:56 PM
I can't believe balsams are a highly prefered browse. I have thousands of them I my property and never seen one that was hit. A WIDNR forester came out and said that I have so many balsams because the deer absolutely won't touch them. I did plant 300 scotch along the road to block off a field, deer ate 298 of them. The balsams do provide great cover and they spread like weeds.

brushpile
12-01-2009, 10:50 PM
I was wrong about Balsam being preferred browse. I was thinking about another evergreen. :o

smsmith
12-02-2009, 09:02 AM
I can't believe balsams are a highly prefered browse. I have thousands of them I my property and never seen one that was hit. A WIDNR forester came out and said that I have so many balsams because the deer absolutely won't touch them. I did plant 300 scotch along the road to block off a field, deer ate 298 of them. The balsams do provide great cover and they spread like weeds.


I have to protect balsams and any other fir on my place. They don't touch them until very late winter/early spring but they will browse them heavily for a period of several weeks. It certainly isn't preferred, but when you have the only concentration of non-spruce evergreens for miles they tend to gravitate towards available food sources.

brushpile
12-02-2009, 12:35 PM
After seeing smsmith's post, I don't believe I was wrong. I based my initial statement, on observations I made on my in-laws Christmas Tree farm. Their farm is in Iowa, where deer have plenty of corn and beans to eat, yet they browsed the leaders off the Balsam Fir.

Deer will browse different plants based on seasonal preference. So there may be no evidence of browsing most of the year, until Fall and Winter. I clearly recall repairing deer damage on many a Balsam Fir Christmas Tree. Deer also have regional preferences, for example, deer won't even look at a turnip on my place, but hammer turnips 50 miles North of me.

MW66
12-04-2009, 12:38 PM
Should I use tree tubes for brushy type native plants? I plan to get the wildlife package from NYS, Saratoga this year and it has a mixture of Highbush Cranberry, Silky Dogwood, and Toringo Crabapple. Would these be wiped out by deer if i just stuck them in the ground or would I have much better success by using tubes? Also, if so, how high?

smsmith
12-04-2009, 12:54 PM
What is your deer population like? Do similar plants growing wild get browsed heavily? Do you have an existing browseline? Protecting plants in some areas is required and in others not so much.

Basically, I protect as much stuff as I can. I use rigid plastic mesh tubes on shrubs/small trees. They aren't "cheap", but compared to the solid tubes they are about 1/4 the cost.

I don't have a lot of deer in either area I plant. However, if what you plant is a preferred food they'll find it.

Here I don't need to protect Highbush Cranberry. I do need to protect any type of dogwood or soft mast producing shrub/tree for at least the first 1-3 years.

MW66
12-04-2009, 01:03 PM
I'm doing some selective cutting in my woods to create some bedding areas. I don't want to plant them and then have them wiped out. I will go through the trouble and expense with tubes if they are necessary for these types of plants, but if not, then gladly I'll just plant them in the cutover. According to the website, Toringo Crabapple is not highly browsed, but of course I'm not sure exactly what that means. I do know that I have to spray my "human apple" trees once a month with deer Off or they will get murdered.

smsmith
12-04-2009, 01:06 PM
Sounds to me like some sort of protection for at least your crabapples will be necessary.

I've come to the same conclusion as you. I planted stuff for a number of years without protection. Most didn't make it. It's cheaper to protect them the first time than to replant several times.