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Tom inPA
10-04-2009, 10:52 AM
I am looking for a pull behind spreader for an ATV for reliably spreading bulk AG lime. I have a TUFF LINE Cyclone pull behind spreader and it works great for pelletized lime and fertilizer. I am looking for a pull behind for bulk lime. Any suggestions or recommendations?

banc123
10-04-2009, 10:59 AM
Whoever invents one with a reasonable in price will have a long line of customers.

There are only two that I know.

The groundbuster, which I wonder how well will handle typical ag lime versus pulverized.

Wicko Model 800, that is said to be able spread ag lime if is not too wet.

Bear Foot Farm
10-04-2009, 12:47 PM
for bulk lime

I'd try to find a drop spreader.


http://www.mcgregoreq.com/specials/Gandy-Drop-a.jpg

hrcarver
10-04-2009, 01:05 PM
I'd try to find a drop spreader.


http://www.mcgregoreq.com/specials/Gandy-Drop-a.jpg

Never used one, but have read the same. Most hopper spreaders do not work well, I do know that. I rent a truck with a belt spreader.

HoytShooter
10-04-2009, 03:49 PM
The belt type spreaders are best for wet aglime. I tryed a drop spreader and all it did was turn the lime into cake batter!!!

bbmclain
10-04-2009, 05:09 PM
Check out the Lil limer

handbizz1
10-04-2009, 10:23 PM
had the 1/2 ton ground buster which did a poor job on bulk lime. caked up badly. did ok with dry bagged lime but i can do that with a regular ag fertilizer spreader. also the lever to control the the slide controlling amount dispensed broke and had to be welded. do not recommend the ground buster lime spreader. i sold mine

Tom inPA
10-05-2009, 08:30 AM
Anymore feedback on the lil limer?

Canuck5
10-05-2009, 08:43 AM
I sent you a pm

dgallow
10-05-2009, 10:33 AM
I am looking for a pull behind spreader for an ATV for reliably spreading bulk AG lime. I have a TUFF LINE Cyclone pull behind spreader and it works great for pelletized lime and fertilizer. I am looking for a pull behind for bulk lime. Any suggestions or recommendations?

If the lime is dry it will feed through your ATV spreader.....we were able to spread 100lb batches of pulverized lime through the ATV attached TSC spreader.....mixing with pell lime improves the flow.

If it's wet, you'll need something belt driven.

dprogers
10-05-2009, 12:30 PM
The best idea I've seen that would be very inexpensive is to blow it out of a pick up bed with a leaf blower. I've been tempted to try it on a couple of small plots that are difficult to get to.

peterb
10-05-2009, 03:06 PM
DP,

I'd like to know how that works out for you. Please post your results.

WVhunter
10-05-2009, 03:12 PM
It works pretty good, I posted a pic on here a couple years back of us blowing lime on our plots. Once you get the back of the bed empty you have to shovel it on to the tail gate and then blow again. It shore beats trying to spread it all by shovel ;)

peterb
10-05-2009, 03:20 PM
hmmmm???

just thinking out loud here......are you putting the appox amount that the plot calls for in the bed......and then just have at it....???

WVhunter
10-06-2009, 11:38 AM
hmmmm???

just thinking out loud here......are you putting the appox amount that the plot calls for in the bed......and then just have at it....???

Thats how we did it. You could also use a small trailer behind an ATV if you have a plot that can't be reached by truck.

WVhunter
10-06-2009, 11:47 AM
http://forums.qdma.com/showthread.php?t=11324&highlight=lime+spreading

Here is the thread with pics.

sandpa005
10-14-2009, 11:11 PM
I have used successful a pick up with a mat that is on a crank. I had ag lime dump on my land very inexpensive and I shoveled it in a pickup and my wife drove slowly while I cranked the handle. It did a great job on my plots.

dgallow
10-15-2009, 09:56 AM
Ran across this the other day and the price wasn't as bad a I expected....any experiences?

http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/product_pages/View_Catalog_Page.asp?mi=6624

food plot 4 life
10-15-2009, 12:29 PM
Ran across this the other day and the price wasn't as bad a I expected....any experiences?

http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/product_pages/View_Catalog_Page.asp?mi=6624

thats not bad , and price is good to ! just what if the lime is wet you no? (good luck)

banc123
10-15-2009, 05:48 PM
Thats the Wicko Model 800 I was referring to.

bhanks55
10-15-2009, 05:54 PM
I have used successful a pick up with a mat that is on a crank. I had ag lime dump on my land very inexpensive and I shoveled it in a pickup and my wife drove slowly while I cranked the handle. It did a great job on my plots.

I have seen those for gravel and what not. Bet that would work nice.

sandpa005
10-15-2009, 11:06 PM
bhanks55, It works great I Think I payed around $55 for it years ago from Northern Equipment. They make one for a mini pick up and full size pick up. It hooks on the tailgate and a matt extends up to the front of the bed and you put your material on top of the matt and crank the handle and the material just falls off the back of the bed. Then I made one pass over my plot with my tractor and disc.I did this two years ago and i will do it again between my fall and summer plot this year.

jdunham
10-16-2009, 09:10 AM
We have a groundbuster we found used. The new ones are overpriced but ours has worked fine. If you load it and travel any distance with even slightly wet lime it will cake and you have to break it up with a bar before you start dropping it. A little more work but it works. Once you start dropping it, it seemed to stay open and worked fine. If the lime was dry it worked great. Ours seems to be very well built. We have run 12 ton through it and will do another 12 ton this year hopefully.

I believe the newer models have been redesigned some to help with the caking. The lil limer looks like a better design from what I remember. I havene't looked at them in some time. Unfortunately there is no easy/cheap answer for those of us who can't get a lime truck on some of our decent sized plots. That's our experience with the ground buster, take it for what it's worth.

bhanks55
10-16-2009, 12:26 PM
bhanks55, It works great I Think I payed around $55 for it years ago from Northern Equipment. They make one for a mini pick up and full size pick up. It hooks on the tailgate and a matt extends up to the front of the bed and you put your material on top of the matt and crank the handle and the material just falls off the back of the bed. Then I made one pass over my plot with my tractor and disc.I did this two years ago and i will do it again between my fall and summer plot this year.

I actually saw one when I was bumping around the farm supply yesterday. Only 85 bucks and said rated for 1000#- wouldnt more than that in the bed of my truck anyway.

eriklane
10-16-2009, 10:00 PM
Used a 5 gal bucket and filled it 3/4 full, shook it out by hand, walking around. Took about 2 hrs for an acre. Free.

Bicep builder.

Or you could buy a few thousand dollar implement you'll use once in 5 yrs.

Ez decision for me.

Guy in the feed store here says he does pell lime 2x a year. Says it gives better results than aglime. However, $4/40# adds up.

I'll take $20 a ton and lasting 5 yrs.

Token_Lake
10-17-2009, 02:44 AM
Used a 5 gal bucket and filled it 3/4 full, shook it out by hand, walking around. Took about 2 hrs for an acre. Free.

When you need 4+ tons per acre on 8 acre's that might be a lil difficult. I'm not THAT energetic ! :D

I know i could build one of those bigger and better so " we " couldn't break them but the cost would be like 2-3x as much I'm sure.

jdunham
10-17-2009, 09:21 AM
We don't have a bucket on our tractor so we shoveled 12 ton into the lime spreader. That was some exercise, which I am usually all for. 12 ton in a 5 gal bucket is out of my range. 12 ton is the minimum we can get delivered around here. To many plots for pellets to make financial sense either. A lime spreader will make more sense in the long haul for some. No easy answer on this one.

eriklane
10-17-2009, 08:22 PM
Yes-of course. 1 acre is fine. 8, no. The guys that can get it delivered (I cannot due to woods) have a huge advantage. Those trucks do a fine job, and quick.

I did see plans for a cheap lime spreader plans on the back: http://userpages.bright.net/~fwo/Lime.html

No idea if it works good, but, I suspect it works OK.

Oh well. I've always kinda wanted to weld one up, but its the axle and the agitator part that I can't seem to figure out how to design. The rest is pretty easy.

E

woodsman324
10-18-2009, 12:16 AM
Everytime one of these threads on lime spreaders comes up I keep going back to it in hopes that someone has figured out how to make one at a reasonable price. One of the Ohio guys was gonna tackle it and I can't remember who. Here is an old one that was converted to 3 point and seems to work pretty slick. It's ground driven and appears to have a straight axle probably with some sort of agitators welded on the axle. Probably something like the tines on a tiller only smaller. Probably a manual gate you open when you get to the field and don't worry about it since you would'nt lose much when you pick the unit up on turns and lose agitation. Who ever makes a reasonably priced unit that works on ag lime will get my vote as QDM'R of the year. We just gotta keep brainstorming!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-ZFMPGpe4I

banc123
10-18-2009, 07:45 AM
That looks like an old drop spreader, since he's using pulverized lime it works better. A lot of drop spreaders can handle pulverized. If you REALLY want to, you can run pulverized through a regular PTO cone spreader and have someone walk along side with a rubber mallet and bang the side. Both rider and banger will look like Casper when its over.

I've studied the commercial ag spreaders and they are not very complicated in technology. Its nothing more than big box with the bottom being a rotating metal grid. The grid is series of locking hinged 1inch squares. Same concept as the rolling tuck bed liner someone mentioned here, but its made of metal hinged grate that works like a tread mill.

It pulls a pile of lime out of the back of box where it falls on the spreader wheels and then rotates under the box in a continuous tread mill. The spreader wheels are turned by pulleys and belts, just like a water pump/alternator on an engine. The power of the belt is a pulley welded to an axle on a smaller tire than is spring loaded to pull down and rest against the main hopper tire. When the big hopper tire turns with the small tire rested on it, it turns the smaller tire , which turns the pulley, which turns the spinners.

By far the most expensive and hardest part to replicate would be the rotating metal grate that operates like at tread mill. Ag lime will not drop, through a hole, it needs to be dumped via gravity to the spinners.

Kunz Engineering
10-18-2009, 09:43 AM
What would everyone consider a reasonable price for an ATV sized lime spreader?

Thanks.
Matt

foggy
10-18-2009, 09:57 AM
Thats part of the problem Matt. It seems people don't want to do tough manual labor...and you cant get anyone else to spread lime in small patches. It's a tough, dirty job spreading lime by hand (maybe we can get Mike Rowe to do it for us).

I think the majority of guys using an ATV have like 3 to 5 acres of food plots. That requires maybe a ton per acre.....every few years. Not really enough acres to justify a high dollar purchase IMHO.

Speaking for myself.....I wouldn't pay much for a lime spreader....as the use is too occasional to get any kind of "payback". I would pay to rent one from my local rental yard - if they were available. ($100 a day would trip my trigger....for a good unit).

I think you would get some action in the $1000. price area (?).

woodsman324
10-18-2009, 10:54 AM
What would everyone consider a reasonable price for an ATV sized lime spreader?

Thanks.
Matt

$500.00 would be great but up to $1000.00 would be reasonable. Like others have said, you don't use them that much so its hard to justify. Personally, I'd like one 5-6 feet wide that I can pull with my 4-wheeler and load with my tractor loader.

eriklane
10-18-2009, 11:54 AM
Lets make this simple: If you have access to a welder and a steel supply, the only hard part is the axle. We can make the tongue out of 2" square 1/2" tubing or even 3/16". The basic shape is a V, so, we need 2 sides cut and then we need a back and a front. Don't need a lid. Need supports inside probably to keep it from bowing. I figure it'll hold 300-600lbs or so. OK. Now, we get a hub from a junk yard, anywhere. How do we mount this to the 'axle' and then how do we make it so it augers properly and we have to be able to control rate, altho I'd suspect that's not such a big deal. It's usually an eyeball type thing...I'm thinknig I could get the steel for $100 and the hub for $100. Then its axle/auger.

I'm stuck there.

Or you can try this: http://userpages.bright.net/~fwo/Lime.html

woodsman324
10-18-2009, 12:05 PM
Lets make this simple: If you have access to a welder and a steel supply, the only hard part is the axle. We can make the tongue out of 2" square 1/2" tubing or even 3/16". The basic shape is a V, so, we need 2 sides cut and then we need a back and a front. Don't need a lid. Need supports inside probably to keep it from bowing. I figure it'll hold 300-600lbs or so. OK. Now, we get a hub from a junk yard, anywhere. How do we mount this to the 'axle' and then how do we make it so it augers properly and we have to be able to control rate, altho I'd suspect that's not such a big deal. It's usually an eyeball type thing...I'm thinknig I could get the steel for $100 and the hub for $100. Then its axle/auger.

I'm stuck there.

Or you can try this: http://userpages.bright.net/~fwo/Lime.html

Some of the guys have made cultipackers with a steel rod for an axle. Agitators could be welded to the axle. The hopper could be wood. If you could figure a way to connect the wheels to the axle and bolt hardware on to the wood to pull it. The gate could be closed for transport.

Canuck5
10-18-2009, 12:14 PM
and made it 6 feet wide overall. If anyone wants to take a look at what the old style "augers" looked like and see the openings the lime falls thru, I have video of what it looks like. You can e-mail me at canuck5@bellsouth.net and I'll send it to you. Not real complex. It spreads reasonably dry AG lime thru it (as well as fertilizer and all cereal grains), like a champ. Water logged AG lime just turns it into cake batter.

jdunham
10-18-2009, 04:31 PM
What would everyone consider a reasonable price for an ATV sized lime spreader?

Thanks.
Matt

Matt,

I think $1,000 - $1,200 would be something that would sell. I am not sure if that is doable or not and still be profitable for anyone. Like has been said, it is hard for alot of guys to justify more than that for as often as most would use it. We have three properties and more acres in food plots than most (most of which are not accessable by trucks) and we could justify it. Was still hard to swallow but you have to lime if your soil is going to produce decent plots. If someone could come up with something in that price range I think you would have a winner.

bush hill
10-18-2009, 06:15 PM
i used a bih one this summer and it stunck. i tried to load it at the pile and drive it to my plots. when i did this it all clumped up and would not come out. so i had to have my uncle drive back and forth to the pile and back to the plot with his tractor with a loader. even doing that it didn't spread all that well. i am not sure if another agitator would help out or not, possibly some kind of shaker or something might.

eriklane
10-18-2009, 08:16 PM
If we welded the auger to the axle and then the axles to the hub, it won't turn well. Need the ability to rotate around. Plus, welding it all up means if someone gets a finger in it, or anything else is in it, it's not gonna stop and all the force of the wheels turning will be translated into a very strong turning auger: safety risk.

I don't wanna read about some young kids looking in and then one of them gets on the tire and woops, a finger is gone, or worse.

For me, I'm fortunate-3 acres at 6.3-6.9 PH, so my lime needs can be handled with a trailer and a shovel or bucket. Shovelling it out in a fan motion works pretty good I have to say. Boring, slow, but, a 2000lb pile of lime isn't really that big.

Figuring the stuff lasts 5 yrs, whats 2 - 4 hours work per acre for 5 yrs benefit?

Have to admit though, the big fert. spreaders that bolt on to the 3pt seem like they could be used for this, but, I suspect not. They want dry material.

Token_Lake
10-19-2009, 04:34 AM
Most of us are not liming once and forget it. Until you get to a " perfect " PH your still going to need to lime every year most likely. For me, we have hundreds of acre's i could never get a truck to. I can get my tractor to them, but never a full lime truck or full size trailer. For me to even afford it, it would take me liming each year, several year's in separate plot's.

Cost.... building it for $100 in steel won't happen. Steel price's are sky high right now and going up. 2x2 .500 wall would be VERY expensive and heavy.

You need a good frame
An axle capable of handling "X" amount of weight, a ton possibly more ? ( $100-$250 )
A metal box, possibly aluminum( $200+)
Add on top of that the chain, sprocket's, pulley's, shaft's, bearing's and gearbox etc. and your talking a few thousand in shiny new part's.

For comparison,
This is a 4'x4' or 4'x6' trailer I can build.
This is $300 in 2x2 steel .120 wall
The floor and side panels in steel are at least another $150+
New 3500# axle, spring's and parts kit etc.
minus wheel's and tire's, that's $750 in part's alone, not including my time.
Fully finished and depending on your options they sell for $1000-$1500

Canuck5
10-19-2009, 07:25 AM
This was done before paint and new tires. It used to be 12 feet wide, overall, now it's 6 feet wide.

Canuck5
10-19-2009, 07:33 AM
It's pretty versitile

Kunz Engineering
10-19-2009, 11:12 AM
Thanks for the feedback guys. I am afraid that we would have trouble building a lime spreader for $1000. There are too many parts involved. I did a quick evaluation and took the same approach as Token_Lake. A nice ATV trailer will cost around $800-$1000 and it doesn't have any of the mechanical workings. I also took a look at small ATV sized manure spreaders. This would have very similar components as a lime spreader and they start around $2000.

Maybe there is a different way to do this. A different way to handle lime on a small scale. I will do some thinking on this.

Matt

sandpa005
10-19-2009, 09:35 PM
Guys what about building a drop bottom and use pellitized lime. That way by the time you disc it in you would get good results compared to using a spin type spreader and spreading too thin then trying to disc it in.I know pellitized cost more but could be more effective if applied right. Just the last time I used a spin spreader my lime was just too thin. Would not a drop bottom with pellitize be better?

kole22
10-19-2009, 11:28 PM
i agree with matt from kunz, I have been tring to figure out a way for along time now, it alll comes back to cost. No one will pay what it cost to build something that will spread bulk lime....

brutejman
10-19-2009, 11:47 PM
x3 Everything you do these days costs an arm and a leg. $100 bucks here and there, it all adds up extremely fast. Im gonna go down to the plant tomorrow and look at the commercial spreaders and see what I can come up with something to put an end to this dilema :)

sandpa005
10-22-2009, 09:20 PM
Bump!!!To the top

tyler0421
01-11-2010, 10:44 PM
Bump. I need to figure out how to spread lime cheap as well!!!

Tdelegram
01-12-2010, 10:14 AM
Not sure if this helps but my ag supply shop mixes my fertalizer, peletised and Ag lime together for use in a regular spreader. I use 5-20-20 for the fertalizer and if i need extra nitrogen for certain plots i get it in 40 pound bags. I usually go 50/50 on the lime and it spreads very well with the fert mixxed in. I end up with a little cost savings over pure pelletized and also get the benefit of both quick and long acting lime.

banc123
01-12-2010, 07:20 PM
The only problem with mixing ag lime and fertilizer is the ratio is so out of whack needing 4,000-6,000 lbs of ag lime to 200lbs or so of fertilizer. It work fine to throw in a few bags of pellet with fertilizer or a bag or two of ag lime; 6,000 lbs is very different.

The bottom line is there is no easy way. Its at times the toughest part of food plotting.

1. Have it spread
2. Get a buggy spreader from the lime dealer, many let you borrow theirs (mine does)
3. Find an old big drop spreader
4. Buy the goundbuster or wikco spreader
5. Use a powerful yard blower and blow it off a trailer or truck bed
6. Shovel it
7. Cut ag lime bags open and throw them around manually
8. Use pellet
9. Use pulverized and put in a PTO spreader and have someone beat on the hopper with a rubber mallet as you go.
10. Hire some manual labor to spread it. 3 guys can shovel spread an acre in an hour.

Me and another guy spread 8,000 lbs with a shovel the first year before I realized #2 was an option.

bogie1
01-12-2010, 10:48 PM
the first year I spread 4 ton of lime by myself by filling 5 gallon bucket's and walking around my plots. Now that I am up to 7 acres of plots that is really something I don't want to waste time doing. Myself and a buddy who owns property as well went in together and got a groundbuster. Expensive, yes well built, yes. The money we each saved on our bulk lime orders when compared to bag or pellet lime paid for each of our share of the spreader (in just one year) something to think about. Good Luck:)

bigbuckingdeer
01-13-2010, 06:26 AM
I found this and thought I would pass it along. Looks to be decent but I don't know the price.


http://www.linco.com/a750esp.htm

kole22
01-13-2010, 10:03 PM
it doesnt spread bulk either, you have to have conveyor.