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beagler
06-30-2009, 12:00 AM
Excuse my ignorance, but I'm still a newbie:o I frost seeded Alta Swede Mammoth Red clover this winter. Since it is an annual, or what some call a single cut clover, does that mean it will die off after it is mowed? If not, how long can I expect to have it in my field?

mod15
06-30-2009, 12:15 AM
I have red clover going on it's 3rd year right now. It is still going strong. I plan to bale it this week let it grow back then plow it under in time to sow wheat in the plot then alfalfa in the spring. I am not sure how long it will last but I let it go to seed last summer then mowed it. My plot had its best stand the 2nd and 3rd year. It is just the cheap red clover nothing fancy or anything.

It will not die off after you mow it, I mowed mine one time the first year then twice the second. due to all of the rain that we have had I have not cut mine this year yet.

M.Magis
06-30-2009, 06:51 AM
I don't think mod15 understood the question, or I didn't understand his response. Not all red clover is the same.
It won't die after cutting, but recovery is slow and typically only one cutting can be had per year. It's not an annual, but rather a perennial with slow recovery.

Lickcreek
06-30-2009, 06:54 AM
I don't think mod15 understood the question. It won't die after cutting, but recovery is slow and typically only one cutting can be had per year. It's not an annual, but rather a perennial with slow recovery.

You got it ;)

That particular clover is not meant to be long lived and might not last more then 2-3 years while some varieties of red clover may last 3-4 years and most will have heavier growth then Alta-Swede requiring 3-5 clippings per summer. :)

beagler
06-30-2009, 11:36 AM
Thanks everyone! Since it is a slow grower after mowing, can white clover smother it out is grown in the same field? I frost seeded 10lbs of red in an existing white clover field that was planted in the fall with the idea of plowing it under for a brassica field this fall, but I do not see much/if any evidence of red clover.....I see tons of white though....

BTW: the only reason I planted the red was because the white didn't appear to be growing well at all. Maybe I was not patient enough and the white shot up during the spring smothering the red. I'm assuming the white has the more tender shouts and white flowers. I see only a few red flowers that are more stemy than the white. Dont get me wrong, I'll glady take the white.:D

Lickcreek
06-30-2009, 03:15 PM
This pic has both red and white growing together and they co-exist pretty well, you can see both white and red flowers in this mix.

http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e288/dbltree/Clover/FallseededcloverJune12.jpg

More then likely your white clover took off and the red may struggle a bit to "catch up"...;)

beagler
06-30-2009, 05:11 PM
This pic has both red and white growing together and they co-exist pretty well, you can see both white and red flowers in this mix.

http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e288/dbltree/Clover/FallseededcloverJune12.jpg

More then likely your white clover took off and the red may struggle a bit to "catch up"...;)

How would you rate alta swede on the palatabilty scale? Do deer mind it? Is it very 'stemy'? This will help me ID it without relying on flowers. Thanks.

dgallow
06-30-2009, 05:11 PM
Sorry to highjack, but since red clovers were mentioned...which vaireties of red clover are drought tolerant?

Lickcreek
06-30-2009, 05:18 PM
How would you rate alta swede on the palatabilty scale? Do deer mind it? Is it very 'stemy'? This will help me ID it without relying on flowers. Thanks.

I have several varieties of red clover and a 1/2 dozen varieties of white clovers planted all side by side and to be honest I can't say that they really prefer any one over another.

They eat the less expensive Alt-Swede red clover the same as more expensive Red Carpet or Starfire red clovers, the only difference is they will last longer and produce more.

This is Alta Swede Mamouth red Clover up close if that helps you any

http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e288/dbltree/Clover/Grazedredclover.jpg

I'm not sure about drought resistance, I stick with Alice and Durana White clovers where I know that will be a problem but have never had any red clovers fail because of drought either. ;)

dgallow
06-30-2009, 06:01 PM
Thanks LC!

We're debating a bit on what to put in the narrow wooded plots...beans/peas prolly won't work...buckwheat gets eradicated by deer before it has a chance. Doubtful much of anything will survive in them through an SEOK summer in competition with the hardwoods and sandy loam.

So we're thinkin a low cost cool season clover planted with SGs in the fall and/or post-frost overseeding with an annual warm season clover in spring. Just something to take a lil pressure off the other bean plots from May to Mid-July and something less expensive than $4 durana.