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View Full Version : Dwarf Chinkapin Oaks, where to get them?


brushpile
02-22-2008, 10:41 PM
This has been discussed in the archives, but after researching the links that Muddy Fork listed some time ago, a good source of Dwarf Chinkapin Oak no longer seems to exsist. With all the Sawtooth Oak controversy, Dwarf Chinkapin produces acorns just as fast, and is a native tree. Yet Sawtooth is readily available, and Dwarf Chinkapin Oaks seem scarce. I want to order 100, and the only source I've found sells them in 1 gallon pots. Don't want to pay homeowner prices, and will not pay to have 100 gallons of dirt sent UPS. Sawtooth is my next option. But before I go non-native, does anyone have a source for Dwarf Chinkapin Oak?

I am also wondering why wildlife nurseries like Morse and Oikos don't sell Dwarf Chinkapin Oak, and instead sell Sawtooth? Maybe Dwarf Chinkapin is difficult to grow or transplant?

HabitatMD
02-22-2008, 10:52 PM
BP,

Hope the qdma folks don't mind this, but look at the www.missouriwhitetails.com forum get a username and password, and send a u2u (like PM here) to letemgrow or start a thread and letemgrow will chime in. If anyone knows where to get them locally, he does.

Blackard
02-22-2008, 10:56 PM
I got my from The Wildlife Group. They have been in the ground for 3 years now and are doing well.

http://www.wildlifegroup.com

brushpile
02-23-2008, 01:26 AM
HabitatMD, I didn't know Missouri had a forum! QDMA is the best place to hear nation wide input, but it would be great to read local threads, and learn local information. I have been reading the Iowa Whitetail Forum, thinking it was the best local source.

Backyard, I attempted to call The Wildlife Group several times today, and the calls failed. So, I emailed them and have not had an answer. However, the Dwarf Chinkapin Oaks on their website were all potted, so the postage would be many times the cost of the trees. When I called, I was hoping to ask if they could ship the trees uprooted. I am wondering why my calls failed, and my email recieved no response... are they still in business?

It can get confusing, as there are Chinkapin Oaks that produce acorns in 20 years, and Dwarf Chinkapin Oaks that produce acorns in 4-5 years. Then there are Ozark Chinkapins (very rare), and Alleghany Chinkapins (which are also native to the Ozarks). Chinkapins are small chestnut trees, subject to blight, while Chinkapin Oak and Dwarf Chickapin Oak are in the White Oak family and produce acorns. The "Dwarf Chinkapin Oak" is the tree I am trying to locate.

Blackard
02-23-2008, 02:38 AM
I ran into problems like that before with several nurseries That I was trying to get a hold of this time of year. When you get a hold of them the will say that they were out digging trees for shipping. I hadn't check on the Dwarf Chikapin oaks for them this year so I didn't realize that they didn't have any bare root left. The trees I got from them were bare root and the cost was a lot less than what they are wanting for the potted ones. I think mine were around $2.00 a piece.If you can ever get a hold of them, they might have a few you could talk them out of.

HabitatMD
02-23-2008, 09:46 AM
BP, I sent letemgrow on MWT a PM and he has a couple sources for dwarf chinkapins.

BTW, I think the Iowa whitetail forum have some real knowledgable folks on it.

richv70
02-23-2008, 11:14 AM
http://oikostreecrops.com/store/product.asp?P_ID=416&PT_ID=69&strPageHistory=cat


I have never ordered anything from them, just stumbled on to them.





Rich

brushpile
02-23-2008, 12:17 PM
Blackard, when I try to call The Wildlife Group, the phone doesn't ring, and my phone display reads, "Call failed". My email to them, asking for a better number or a call back, has gone unanswered.

richv70, Oikos does have Dwarf Chinkapin Oaks, but they are in paper pots full of dirt, and they charge $8 each for 3-6" sprouts. 100 or more are $3.20 each, but they are still just sprouted seeds in a pot full of dirt! So far, they appear to be my only option though.

chasmo54
02-23-2008, 02:12 PM
Morse sells a Deam's oak hybrid. It's a cross between chinkapin and dwarf chinkapin that might work. They grow them in jiffy pellets that air root prune the seedlings to help them produce earlier. A full box of 64 seedlings cost me $27 for the shipping and if I had bought bare root without soil it would have cost me $15. The way I looked at it was it cost me $12 more to have the soil shipped and to get plants that weren't in transplant shock. I thought the $12 was well worth it in my opinion, plus to get plants I could fertilize right away instead of waiting until the following year like bare root was exciting as who wants to wait a year or two to see them start to grow.

brushpile
02-23-2008, 09:30 PM
Thanks Chasmo, but if I go Missouri Native, the state will remburse me for the trees, provided they are reasonably priced.

chasmo54
02-23-2008, 09:41 PM
Thanks Chasmo, but if I go Missouri Native, the state will remburse me for the trees, provided they are reasonably priced.

Brushpile,
Both the Chinkapin and dwarf Chinkapin are native to your state, the hybrid is simply a natural cross that occurs between the two. I would ask your state if you can't find what your looking for.

brushpile
02-23-2008, 11:59 PM
Chasmo, I can't understand why a Dwarf Chinkapin Oak would be hybridized? Dwarf Chinkapin Oak produces acorns in five years. By crossing it with a Chinkapin Oak, which produces acorns in 20 years, it lengthens the time for acorn production. Why would you want a hybrid tree that takes longer to produce acorns? Plus Dwarf Chinkapin Oak produces brushy cover.

Have your Deems Oaks shown brushy growth, and when do you expect to see acorns? The Deems Oak from Morse Nursery seems a better option at $10 a tree, than Oikos 3-6" potted sprouts at $8. What kind of growth have you had, and how large were Morse Nursery's trees when you recieved them? Air root pruning should produced rapid growth, which inclines me to order from Morse Nursery.

chasmo54
02-24-2008, 12:07 PM
Chasmo, I can't understand why a Dwarf Chinkapin Oak would be hybridized? Dwarf Chinkapin Oak produces acorns in five years. By crossing it with a Chinkapin Oak, which produces acorns in 20 years, it lengthens the time for acorn production. Why would you want a hybrid tree that takes longer to produce acorns? Plus Dwarf Chinkapin Oak produces brushy cover.

Have your Deems Oaks shown brushy growth, and when do you expect to see acorns? The Deems Oak from Morse Nursery seems a better option at $10 a tree, than Oikos 3-6" potted sprouts at $8. What kind of growth have you had, and how large were Morse Nursery's trees when you recieved them? Air root pruning should produced rapid growth, which inclines me to order from Morse Nursery.

Brushpile,
If you want dwarf chinkapin I would order from Oikos, and your right they are bushy and produce sooner. The Deams oak will probably be more tree than bush (Lots of branches for an Oak) and take somewhat longer to produce but not that much longer. The acorns will eventually be hundreds to thousands more per tree and larger would be my guess. The price for 8 trees when I checked were $6 each and the trees I've recieved from Morse have always been small. I have not ever planted this hybrid myself so I'm not sure of the growth, I have planted dwarf Chinkapin and they were 3-4 feet in 3 years, very slow growing. Personally, I would plant a shrub along with whatever you decided on planting for mast if you want cover. While mine are bushy it looks like it will be several years before they are big enough for cover. You might even think about Hazelnut as they grow into a very nice bush within 3 years and produce very nice edible nuts usually within 5 years.

hillbilly archer
02-24-2008, 08:13 PM
very slow growing

I thought the dwarf chinkapin oaks were supposed to be fast growers, I heard acorns in 4-5 years sometimes.

chasmo54
02-24-2008, 08:23 PM
I thought the dwarf chinkapin oaks were supposed to be fast growers, I heard acorns in 4-5 years sometimes.

Chinkapin Oak will produce acorns in 4-5 years hillbilly archer but are slow growing oak shrubs, easily confused with chinquapins of the Castanea family of fast growing chestnuts.

brushpile
02-24-2008, 09:27 PM
Hillbillyarcher, I think Chasmo ment to say that "Dwarf" Chinkapin Oak will produce acorns in 4-5 years. Chinkapin Oak takes 20 or more, and I have some nice Chinkapin Oaks that are mature trees in production.

Dwarf Chinkapin Oak is the only native oak that bears acorns in 4-5 years. Plus it produces brushy cover. I would think that it would be a best seller at wildlife nurseries, but they are darned hard to find. Too bad, because they can be planted for both cover and food. It is a good tree for edge feathering, and travel corridors. In addition to deer, it benefits Quail, Turkey, and other wildlife.

hillbilly archer
02-26-2008, 07:14 PM
Hillbillyarcher, I think Chasmo ment to say that "Dwarf" Chinkapin Oak will produce acorns in 4-5 years. Chinkapin Oak takes 20 or more, and I have some nice Chinkapin Oaks that are mature trees in production

Oh, Ok gottcha. Thats what I thought.

Thanks.

smsmith
02-27-2008, 09:42 AM
Haven't done business with them, but this place appears to have D.C. oaks and plenty of others. Price doesn't seem too out of line

http://truenaturefarm.com/treecatalog.html

maya
02-27-2008, 05:12 PM
Anyone know of any nursuries in the northeast for oaks?

brushpile
03-05-2008, 11:41 PM
After smsmith posted that True Nature Farms had Dwarf Chinkapin Oaks, I waited a few days to see if I could find them in bare root. Then, when I called the nursery, the owner said he had been flooded with calls and was sold out. He sounded bewildered saying, "Everyone is calling for them all of a sudden".;) Later in the day I got a call from another nursery, and placed an order for 100 trees for a buck each.:) After days of searching, my last hope paid off!

I plan to plant them between my apple trees, as Dwarf Chinkapin Oak will not get tall enough to compete with apple trees. So, I should have both hard and soft mast at one location in about 3-4 years. Plus I will have brushy cover between my apple trees, making them more likely to be a day time food souce.:D